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Full text of "Graduate Bulletin of The University of Southern Mississippi"

Graduate 

Bulletin 

2007-2008 



The University of Southern Mississippi 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39406 



GENERAL CATALOG ISSUE 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

2007-2008 

FALL SEMESTER OPENS AUGUST 22, 2007 

The University of Southern Mississippi Bulletin (USPS-652-260) 

Published annually by The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, 

Mississippi. Media Mail Postage Paid at Hattiesburg, Mississippi, 39402-9998. 

POSTMASTER: Send address change to The University of Southern Mississippi, 

118 College Drive #5166, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 



The University of Southern Mississippi is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's, master's, specialist's, and doctoral degrees. 

The University of Southern Mississippi offers to all persons equal access to educational, programmatic, 
and employment opportunities without regard to age, sex, sexual orientation, religion, race, color, 
national origin, Vietnam-era veteran status, or disability status. These provisions are pursuant to 
applicable federal and state regulations. Inquiries concerning discrimination should be directed to the 
Office of Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity, 310 McLemore Hall, The University of 
Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39406-5168. 

Information contained in this publication is subject to change without prior notice. Any changes 
in this publication are on file in the Registrar's Office. Information contained herein shall not 
constitute a binding agreement on the part of The University of Southern Mississippi. 

The University of Southern Mississippi uses a portion of educational and general funds, 
including tuition and fees, for operating costs, including merit scholarships. 

Students at The University of Southern Mississippi are responsible for knowing and complying 
with all requirements for their respective degrees as stated herein. 

The colors of the University are black and gold. 

The mascot is Golden Eagle. 

This bulletin was produced using EPA recommended standard recycled paper containing 40 
percent waste product and printed with soybean-based ink. our vow 



VOLUME 92 NUMBER 3 

(Published April 2007) 



The Contents 



Academic Calendar 1 

Introduction 3 

Graduate Studies 13 

Degrees Offered 15 

Admission Requirements and Procedures 17 

Master's Degree 18 

Specialist's Degree 19 

Doctoral Degree 20 

Non-Degree 21 

International 23 

General Degree Requirements 26 

General Academic Information 34 

Research Policies 38 

Student Expenses, Financial Aid 39 

University Facilities and Student Services 48 

College of Arts and Letters 52 

College of Business 97 

College of Education and Psychology 104 

College of Health 151 

College of Science and Technology 187 

Course Descriptions 228 

Administration and Faculty 342 

Index 364 

The University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast 1-20 



Correspondence 

Requests for a Bulletin, an application form, or information concerning admissions policies 
and procedures, room and board, and tuition may be addressed to 

Graduate Admissions 
The University of Southern Mississippi 
11.8 College Drive #10066 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

Web site: www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/ 
E-mail: graduatestudies@usm.edu 

Other correspondence may be addressed as follows: 

Director, Office of Graduate Studies 

#5024 

Dean, College of Arts and Letters 
#5004 

Dean, College of Business 

#5021 

Dean, College of Education and Psychology 

#5023 

Dean, College of Health 
#10075 

Dean, College of Science and Technology 

#5165 

The University of Southern Mississippi 
1 1 8 College Drive 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 



Introduction 



Academic Calendar 



wm&&$$?& i M 



Monday-Friday 
March 19-23 

Monday-Friday 
March 26-April 6 

Friday, May 1 1 

Friday, May 25 



SUMMER 2007' 



Advisement in departments 

Southern's Online Accessible Records (SOAR) Web Registration 
by registration window 

Application deadline for new students - 
Check www.usm.edu/graduatestudies 

Final orientation and registration for new undergraduate students 
Open registration for all students not registered via SOAR 




Monday, May 28 
Tuesday, May 29 
Tuesday, June 26 

Wednesday, July 4 
Friday, July 6 

Friday, July 27 

Mondav-Friday 

Jufy 30- August 3 

Saturday, August 4 



Memorial Day holiday; night classes will meet. 

Classes begin. 

Midpoint in semester 

examinations for first-half semester (5W1) classes 

Independence Day holiday (observed) 

Last day to file application for degree for fall 
2007 commencement 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 

Examinations 
Residence halls close. 



Monday-Friday, 
March 19-23 

Mondav-Friday 
Apr'il 9-27 

Friday, August 3 

Saturday, August 1 8 
Tuesday, August 22 
Wednesday, August 22 
Monday, September 3 

Friday, October 12 

Thursday-Friday 
October 18-19 

Friday, November 2 

Wednesday, November 2 1 
6 p.m. 

Monday, November 26 

Wednesday, December 5 

Friday-Thursday 
December 7-13 

Fridav. December 1 4 



FALL 2007* 

Advisement in departments 

Southern's Online Accessible Records (SOAR) Web Registration 
by registration window 

Application deadline for new students - 
Check www.usm.edu/graduatestudies 

Residence halls open. 

Open registration for all students not registered via SOAR 

Classes begin. 

Labor Day holiday; 

day and night classes will not meet. 

Midpoint in semester 

examinations for first-half semester (8W1) classes 

Fall break; 

day and night classes will not meet. 

Last day to file application for degree for spring 
2008 commencement 

Thanksgiving holidays begin; 

day and night classes will not meet. 

Classes resume. 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 

Examinations 

Commencement, Bernard Reed Green Coliseum 



*Graduate Student Special Deadlines - see www.usm.edu/graduatestudies 



2 || Introduction 



Monday-Friday, 
October 8-12 

Monday - Friday, 
October 15 -Nov. 2 



Friday, December 7 



Thursday, January 1 
Friday, January 1 1 
Monday, January 14 

Monday, January 21 



Monday-Tuesday, 
February 4-5 

Friday, March 7 



Monday-Friday, 
March 10-14 

Monday, March 17 
Thursday, March 20 

Friday, March 21 

Monday, March 24 
Friday, May 2 
Monday-Friday, 
May 5-9 

Friday, May 9 

Saturday, May 10 



SPRING 2008* 

Advisement in departments 

Southern's Online Accessible Records (SOAR) Web Registration 
by registration window 

Application deadline for new students- 
Check www.usm.edu/graduatestudies 

Residence halls open 

Open registration for all students not registered via SOAR 

Classes begin 

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Birthday (observed) 
day and night classes will not meet 

Mardi Gras Holiday 

day and night classes will not meet 

Mid-point in semester 

examinations for first term (8W1) classes 

Spring Holidays 

Second term (8W2) classes begin 

Last day to file application for degree for summer 

2008 

Good Friday Holiday 

day and night classes will not meet 

Classes resume 

Last day of regularly scheduled classes 

Examinations 

Commencement, Bernard Reed Green Coliseum 

Residence halls close 



Calendar Notes 



*Graduate Student Special Deadlines - see www.usm.edu/graduatestudies 



Introduction | 3 



Introduction 



The University of Southern Mississippi and its board of trustees were established by an act of the 
Legislature approved on March 30, 1910, by Gov Edmund F. Noel. Its first name was the Mississippi 
Normal College, and its original purpose was to train teachers for the rural schools of Mississippi. 
On February 2, 1932. the Legislature established the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher 
Learning and placed under its jurisdiction the five colleges and one university owned and operated by 
the state. On November 3, 1942, the people of the state voted to make the Board of Trustees of State 
Institutions of Higher Learning a constitutional board for all colleges and universities of the state. The 
University of Southern Mississippi is now operated under the jurisdiction of that constitutional board. 

The act of March 30, 1910, did not provide any state money for the building of Mississippi Nonnal College, 
but did provide that localities in the state might bid for its location by offering land for a site and money for 
constructing buildings. On September 16, 1910, the Board of Trustees accepted the bid of Hattiesburg and 
Forrest County to supply $250,000 and a free site. That site was west of the city in cut-over timberland with 
great pine stumps everywhere. Contracts were let to clear the land and to build buildings. 

The five permanent buildings (College Hall, Forrest County Hall, Hattiesburg Hall, the Industrial Cottage 
[now the Honor House], and the President's Home [now the Alumni House]), a temporary wooden Dining 
Hall, and other necessary improvements were barely finished when the Mississippi Normal College opened on 
the rainy morning of September 18, 1912, with a president, a faculty of 1 8, and a student body of 200. 

On October 17, 1911, Joseph Anderson Cook, superintendent of schools in Columbus, Mississippi, was 
elected president. The University of Southern Mississippi has had only eight presidents since its founding. 
The Board of Trustees elected Claude Bennett president, effective October 10, 1928. On April 23, 1933, 
the Board of Trustees elected Dr. Jennings Burton George as the third president, effective July 1, 1933. On 
June 13, 1945, the Board of Trustees elected Dr. Robert Cecil Cook as the fourth president and he officially 
assumed office on July 1, 1945. On October 21, 1954, President Cook submitted his resignation. He served 
until December 31, 1954, and Dr. Richard Aubrey McLemore became acting president on January 1, 1955. 
The Board of Trustees, on May 19, 1955, elected Dr. William David McCain as the fifth president. He 
officially assumed office on August 1, 1955, and retired June 30, 1975. Dr. Aubrey Keith Lucas became the 
sixth president of the university on July 1, 1 975, and served until his retirement on December 31,1 996, with 
the longest tenure of any president. Dr. Horace Weldon Fleming, Jr., served as the seventh president from 
January 1, 1997, until August 30, 2001. Dr. Aubrey K. Lucas returned to the presidency on September 1, 
2001, and served until April 30, 2002. On April 13, 2002, the Board ofTrustees elected Dr. Shelby F Thames 
as the eighth president, effective May 1 , 2002. 

As has been stated, The University of Southern Mississippi was founded on March 30, 1910, as the 
Mississippi Normal College. On March 7, 1924, the Legislature changed the name to State Teachers 
College. On February 8, 1940, the Legislature changed the name to Mississippi Southern College, and 
on February 27, 1962, the Legislature changed the name to The University of Southern Mississippi. 

The Mississippi Nonnal College did not grant degrees in its early years but awarded certificates for 
the completion of certain specified courses of study. On April 8, 1922, the Legislature authorized the 
awarding of the bachelor of science degree. The bachelor of music degree was authorized by the Board 
ofTrustees on June 19, 1 934. The first bachelor of arts degree was awarded on August 20, 1940. On May 
26, 1947, the Board of Trustees authorized the initiation of graduate work and the awarding of the master 
of arts degree. In the years since 1947, the university's graduate programs have developed logically to 
meet the needs for professional competence beyond the academic measure of the baccalaureate degree. 
Doctoral programs were first authorized by the Board ofTrustees on May 20, 1959. 

The administrative and academic organization of The University of Southern Mississippi is divided into the 
following areas: Office of the President; Office of the Provost; Office of the Chief Financial Officer; Office 
of the Vice President for Research and Economic Development; Office of the Vice President for Student 
Affairs; and Office of the Director of Intercollegiate Athletics. Academically, the university is organized into 
the College of Arts and Letters, College of Business, College of Education and Psychology, College of 
Health, College of Science and Technology, and Honors College. 



, ^^_^.^., 



' : f:ffu: 



4 J Introduction 



The University of Southern Mississippi 
Vision 

The University of Southern Mississippi will be a leading university in engaging and empowering 
individuals to transform lives and communities. 

Mission 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a comprehensive research extensive university. Our 
primary mission is to cultivate intellectual development and creativity through the generation, 
dissemination, application, and preservation of knowledge. 

Our mission is supported by the values that have been formed through the history and traditions of 
our institution. These values are widely and deeply held beliefs of our faculty, staff, students, and 
administrators: 

• Education provides opportunities to improve the quality of intellectual, social, economic, and 
personal well-being. These opportunities should be available to all who are willing and able 
to meet our standards of excellence. 

• Our success is reflected by the degree to which our students become well-read, articulate, and 
creative and critical thinkers. It is measured by their display of specialized knowledge and 
abilities suitable to the pursuit of a career and life in our complex, ever-changing world. 

• We cherish innovation in the creation and application of basic and applied research findings, 
creative and artistic expression, meaningful learning experiences, the scope of services 
provided to our students and the broader community that we sustain, and the continuing 
evolution of degree programs that both respond to and anticipate the evolving demands of our 
society, employers, and the labor market. 

• Education encourages and advances the ideals of a pluralistic democratic society: civic 
responsibility, integrity, diversity, and ethical behavior. 

• Academic freedom and shared governance are long-established and living principles at the 
university. We cherish the free exchange of ideas, diversity of thought, joint decision making, 
and individuals" assumption of responsibility. 

We make efficient use of our resources, for we are accountable to our university communities, 
the Board of Trustees, and taxpayers. 

Commitments 

Educating Our Students 

The University of Southern Mississippi will maintain its leadership in pedagogy and instruction. 
The Genera] Education Curriculum, First Year Experience, and Honors College programs, as well 
as innovative programs in international education and service-learning, underscore the institution's 
commitment to education. 

Educating the Whole Student 

Recognizing that students learn outside the classroom as well as within, The University of Southern 
Mississippi will fulfill its commitment to developing the potential of its students. The university 
engages its students through abundant , opportunities for community service, leadership, student 
activities, support services, access to state-of-the-art facilities, and programs. A caring, student- 
centered faculty and staff foster students' personal growth and development. Acknowledging the 
mutual benefit of maintaining close ties with graduates, the university is also committed to creating 
opportunities for alumni involvement in university activities. 



Introduction j 5 



Leading in Academic Excellence 

The University of Southern Mississippi is committed to quality in all academic areas. The university 
will maintain its leadership position in selected programs in science, technology, arts, humanities, 
health, education, psychology, and business and will continue to be innovative in the development 
of programs. 

Conducting Innovative Research 



As a comprehensive research institution, The University of Southern Mississippi will pursue 
groundbreaking scholarship, creative activity, and research in science, technology, arts, humanities, 
education, health, psychology, and business. Distinguished faculty and staff will utilize research 
and scholarship opportunities to fortify the education of undergraduate and graduate students and 
implement service initiatives in the university, in the community, and in their academic disciplines as 
they push the boundaries of knowledge and discovery. 

Creating Healthier Communities 



The University of Southern Mississippi will contribute to the health and well-being of individuals, 
families, organizations, and communities through continued innovation in applied research, 
community partnerships, and experiential learning. 

Leading in Economic Development 



The University of Southern Mississippi will continue its initiatives in economic development and 
entrepreneurship. These initiatives include education and providing intellectual capital to augment 
economic opportunities. 

Enriching the Cultural Environment 



The University of Southern Mississippi will provide opportunities for the community to experience 
a variety of cultural activities. Regular events, performances, exhibits, and presentations provide the 
campuses and surrounding regions with exposure to talented students, faculty, and renowned athletes, 
artistits, and scholars. The university continues to serve as a primary provider of athletic, artistic, and 
cultural events and education. 

Creating Global Communities 



The University of Southern Mississippi will continue to provide students with opportunities to live 
and learn abroad in preparation for leadership roles in an interdependent global society. 



6 i Introduction 



e;'^;|fS 



General Information 



I E-Mail Accounts 

/Tech offers electronic mail (e-mail) services. If you are eligible (see below), you are entitled 
to one e-mail account, which is kept active for the entire time you are enrolled or working at 
Southern Miss. In the event you leave Southern Miss due to graduation or employment elsewhere, 
there is a grace period before your account is removed. 

The University of Southern Mississippi expects all students to have an active Southern Miss e-mail 
account. We can forward your Southern Miss mail to any e-mail account you may have already. 
Your e-mail account will be used by Southern Miss and classroom instructors to communicate 
important information. You should get in the habit of checking your e-mail account daily. 

In order to use your e-mail account, you must bring a valid ID to the Help Desk to activate your 
e-mail account and get a SOAR password if you do not already have one, or you may call the Help 
Desk weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. at 266-HELP (4357). 

After you have established your account and password, you can reset a lost password by clicking 
on the "Forgot Password" link on the SOAR login page. This will allow you to reset your password 
without contacting the Help Desk. 

All current Southern Miss students, faculty, and staff are eligible to receive e-mail accounts at no 
charge. 

EagleAir Wireless Internet Access 

The University of Southern Mississippi offers students, staff, faculty, and guests access to wireless 
LAN services with high speed links to the Internet. Wireless Internet access is available to students 
from almost any building on the Hattiesburg campus. WebCT and other essential data services may 
be accessed from anywhere on campus. Qualified wireless users may sign up for the service from 
their SOAR accounts. 

Students may register one PC or laptop plus up to 2 additional wireless devices on the EagleAir 
network. Students can pay for access through the SOAR online billing process; there is no need 
for a separate method of payment. /Tech strives to provide the highest quality of access to wireless 
services. Students who experience problems accessing EagleAir should contact the /Tech Help 
Desk at 601-266-4357. 

Publications 

The University of Southern Mississippi has three publications each year: the Undergraduate Bulletin, 
the Graduate Bulletin, and the Regional Campus Publication. To obtain information about the 
complete programs of the university, please check each publication. 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended (FERPA) 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended deals with one subject only: 
educational records. The purpose of the law is to define, more precisely than ever has been done, who 
may or may not see them. On the one hand, the law grants students guaranteed access; on the other 
hand, it takes from the universities the privilege of indiscriminate disclosure. 

The FERPA sets forth these main requirements: 

1 . It allows a student access to each educational record that a university or college keeps on him or 
her; 

2. It requires the institution to establish a policy on how students can go about seeing specific 
records; 

3. It requires the institution to inform all students as to what rights they have under the amendment, how 
they can act on these rights according to school policy, and how they can see a copy of the policy; 
and 

4. It requires the institution to seek student permission, in writing, before disclosing any 
personally identifiable record to individuals other than professional personnel employed in the 
university or college (and others who meet certain specified requirements). 

The university has developed and put into writing a policy for handling requests from students and 
for disclosing personally identifiable information about students. Students are notified of their rights 
under the law by publishing the university policy in the Student Handbook. 



Introduction j 7 



Oak Ridge Associated Universities 

Since 1992, students and faculty of The University of Southern Mississippi have benefited from its 
membership in Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 96 colleges and 
universities, and a contractor for die U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 
ORAU works with its member institutions to help their students and faculty gain access to federal research 
facilities throughout the country; to keep its members informed about opportunities for fellowship, 
scholarship, and research appointments; and to organize research alliances among its members. 

Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), the DOE facility that 
ORAU operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, as well as faculty enjoy access to a multitude of 
opportunities for study and research. Students can participate in programs covering a wide variety of 
disciplines including business, earth sciences, epidemiology, engineering, physics, geological sciences, 
pharmacology, ocean sciences, biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics. Appointment 
and program length range from one month to four years. Many of these programs are especially 
designed to increase the numbers of underrepresented minority students pursuing degrees in science- 
and engineering-related disciplines. A comprehensive listing of these programs and other opportunities, 
their disciplines, and details on locations and benefits can be found in the ORISE Catalog of Education 
and Training Programs, which is available at http .//www.orau . gov/orise/educ. htm , or by calling either 
of the contacts below. 

ORAU's Office of Partnership Development seeks opportunities for partnerships and alliances 
among ORAU's members, private industry, and major federal facilities. Activities include faculty 
development programs, such as the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Awards, the Visiting 
Industrial Scholars Program, consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research and support 
programs, as well as services to chief research officers. 

For more information about ORAU and its programs, contact 

Dr. Cecil D. Burge Monnie E. Champion 

Vice President for Research ORAU Corporate Secretary 

and Economic Development (865)576-3306 
ORAU Councilor for Southern Miss 

Visit the ORAU home page at http://www-.orau.org . 

Retention of Students and Program Completion Information 

The University of Southern Mississippi Fact Book includes information on retention and graduation and is located 
in the reserve material at the circulation desk in Joseph Anderson Cook Library and is available upon request 

Sexual Harassment 

To foster an environment of respect for the dignity and worth of all members of the university 
community, Southern Miss is committed to maintaining working and learning environments free of 
sexual harassment. It is the policy of the university that no member of its community shall sexually 
harass another. Any employee or student who violates this policy is subject to disciplinary action 
which may include termination. Sexual harassment is illegal under federal law. 

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act 

The University of Southern Mississippi complies with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 
and the Americans with Disabilities Act. No otherwise qualified handicapped person, solely on the 
basis of handicap, will be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected 
to discrimination in the administration of any educational program or activity, including admission 
or access thereto or in treatment or employment therein by The University of Southern Mississippi. 
All reasonable accommodations for students must be approved through die Office for Disability 
Accommodations (ODA); accommodations for faculty and staff must be approved through the 
Human Resources director. Students who need assistance in reasonably accommodating a disability 
in the classroom or on campus should contact the ODA director at (601) 266-5024 or (228) 214-3232; 
faculty/staff should contact the director of Human Resources at 266-4050. Individuals with hearing 
impairments can use Mississippi Relay Service at 1-800-582-2233 (TTY) to contact campus offices. 



8 || Introduction 



The University Press of Mississippi 

The University Press of Mississippi was founded in 1970 to encourage the dissemination of the 
fruits of research and study through the publication of scholarly works. Functioning as the scholarly 
publishing arm of the state-supported universities in Mississippi, The University Press is governed 
by a Board of Directors made up of one representative from each of the eight state universities, one 
representative from the Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning, and the director of the 
press. 

The University Press publishes more than 50 books each year. Primary areas of interest are 
Mississippi history and literature, but manuscripts in all areas of study are welcomed. 

Administrative offices of The University Press are located in the Education and Research Center of 
Mississippi, 3825 Ridgewood Rd., Jackson, MS, 39211. 



The University of Southern Mississippi Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association was established in 1917 as an organization mainly involved in functions relating to 
placement service. Since its rebirth in 1946, when the Executive Committee recognized the need for a working 
Alumni Association with organized alumni groups in the various counties of the state, the Association has 
operated in its present form, serving as a link between the university and its former students. 

Southern Miss graduates and former students are encouraged to become active in the Alumni 
Association and its support of the university's various academic and athletic programs. Of more than 
1 15,000 graduates since the university's founding, the Alumni Association has enlisted in excess of 
1 6,000 paid members for the past several years. 

The Association provides a number of benefits to its members, including a subscription to the quarterly 
alumni magazine, Tfie Talon, which helps graduates stay infomied of campus developments and provides 
updates on fonner classmates. Other benefits include a waiver of out-of-state tuition for children of 
members who meet certain requirements, receipt of mailings on area alumni chapter meetings, library privileges, 
car decals, eligibility to join the USM Credit Union, and various other special events. The Association produces a 
biannual newsletter, Southern Miss Connections, which is sent to all Southern Miss graduates who have accurate 
addresses in the database. In addition, SouthemMissAlumni.com remains an important information source for 
all alumni of the institution, as well as an avenue to locate old friends and classmates for paid members of the 
Association. 

The Association is very active in developing other programs to support all areas of the university. These 
include organizing joint district Eagle Club meetings in conjunction with the Athletic Department, athletic 
road game trips and educational excursions to such locations as Switzerland and England. 

The Alumni Association also sponsored the drive to raise the funds necessary for the construction of 
the first R. C. Cook University Union building, helped establish the USM Foundation (the receptacle 
for all gifts to the university), and organized The Legacy, an organization comprised of hard-working, 
enthusiastic students involved in a variety of activities each semester to promote the university. 

Organized alumni chapters are urged to hold a meeting each year for the election of officers on or 
around March 30, the date selected by the Association as Founders' Day in commemoration of the 
founding of the university on that date in 1910. All former students of Southern Miss are encouraged 
to gather in honor of the university on this date. 



Introduction 



University Libraries 



Library facilities at The University of Southern Mississippi include the Joseph Anderson Cook 
Library and the William David McCain Library and Archives on the Hattiesburg campus, the Gulf 
Coast Library in Long Beach, and the Gunter Library in Ocean Springs. An extensive Web site 
provides access to the libraries online holdings, including full text and bibliographic databases, 
electronic journals and books, and digitized exhibits from the libraries Special Collections. The 
libraries Web site also provides access to services such as reference and research assistance, tutorials 
and other instructional services, and document delivery. 

The Joseph Anderson Cook Library 

The Joseph Anderson Cook Library contains the principal collections of books, journals, microforms, 
music, media, and other materials which support the research and instructional programs of the 
university at all levels. Book stacks and reading areas are intermingled throughout the building 
in an open shelf arrangement. Access is provided to a variety of fulltext databases, bibliographic 
databases, and Internet resources on a wide range of subjects. The collections are arranged according 
to the Library of Congress Classification System. The library is currently acquiring approximately 
25,000 new volumes annually and maintaining 5,000 print and over 15,000 electronic journal titles. 

Curriculum Materials Center 

Curriculum Materials Center, located in Cook Library, contains the principle collection of books 
and other printed materials, audiovisuals, and computer software that directly support the teacher 
education programs. There is a computer lab with IBM compatible computers. Textbooks on the state 
adoption list are available as well as a collection of children's literature trade books. 

The William David McCain Library and Archives 

The William David McCain Library and Archives houses the special collections and archives of The 
University of Southern Mississippi. Resources are available for use by the public and the university 
community in the Cleanth Brooks Reading Room. Materials housed in this facility do not circulate 
outside the building. The online catalog and other descriptive finding aids serve as points of access to 
the collections. Among the notable holdings of McCain Library and Archives are the Mississippiana 
Collection; the de Grummond Children's Literature Collection; the papers of William M. Colmer, 
Theodore G. Bilbo, and Paul B. Johnson, Jr.; the Walen Collection of Confederate and Civil War 
History; and the Cleanth Brooks Collection of belles lettres. 

The Gulf Coast Library 

The Gulf Coast Library moved into its new facility in 2002. The library contains collections of print 
and nonprint materials which directly support the instructional programs of the Long Beach campus. 
Currently, the library subscribes to almost 400 serial titles with online full text access to more than 
14,000 titles. The curriculum lab contains over 37,000 volumes. Holdings at the Gulf Coast Library 
are supplemented by the print resources of the Hattiesburg campus. Electronic resources are available 
for all university faculty, staff and students regardless of location. 



The Gunter Library 

The Gunter Library was founded by its namesake, Dr. Gordon Gunter, third director of the Gulf 
Coast Research Laboratory. Located on the first floor of the Caylor Building, the Gunter Library 
supports the research and instructional activities of the Department of Coastal Sciences and GCRL 
scientists and technicians. The Gunter Library receives 250 journal titles by subscription and as 
gifts and exchanges. Holdings include 7,000 books and 21,000 reprints grey literature materials. 
The collection is comprehensive in all areas related to coastal sciences. Gunter Library is a full 
service library providing interlibrary loan, reference assistance, and bibliographic instruction. Four 
computers, two b/w laser printers, one color printer, a scanner, and a photocopying machine are 
available. University Libraries online resources are available at Gunter Library. 



10 I Introduction 

The University of Southern Mississippi 
Museum of Art 

The University of Southern Mississippi Museum of Art was established in 1997 by the Board of 
Trustees. Located in the Fine Arts Building off Southern Drive, the museum is composed of three 
exhibition galleries: The C. W. Woods Art Gallery, the Lok Exhibition Gallery, and the Karnes- 
Sullivan Gallery. Over 20,000 people visit the museum annually. Admission to the museum is free. 

Recent exhibitions have included A View to the Past: Old Master Prints and Drawings from the 
New Orleans Museum of Art, Borderlands: Paintings and Monotypes by Katherine Kadish, and 
Concerning Development by Matthew Moore. The museum also exhibits works by Southern 
Miss Department of Art and Design faculty and students as well as the works from the museum's 
permanent collection, which includes Pablo Picasso, Joan Miro, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, Amedeo 
Modigliani, Georges Rouault, Marc Chagall and many well-known Mississippi artists such as Walter 
Anderson, Marie Hull, Dusti Bonge, and Richmond Barthe. 

In 2006-2007, the museum presented Drawing on Katrina: Mississippi Children Respond to the 
Storm; Silent Witness, photographs by Keith Fishman and The New American Village by James R. 
Polk and the Frank Lloyd Write School of Architecture; Myth of Romance, works in glass by Mitchell 
Gaudet, and the Fall 2006 Senior Show. After winter break the museum presented Fac(i)es by Jan 
Siesling and Patina, poems and illustrations by Chris Karnes; Native Perspectives on the Trail: A 
Contemporary American Indian Art Portfolio from the Missoula Art Museum and Sprawl, works by 
Aaron Wilson and Tim Dooley; the 2006-2007 Annual Student Show; and the 2007 Spring Senior 
Show. 



Introduction 



Accrediting Agencies 



The University of Southern Mississippi is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor's, master's, specialist's, and 
doctoral degrees. Specific academic programs as noted in this Bulletin have been accredited by 
the following accreditation agencies: 

SACS - COMMISSION ON COLLEGES OF THE SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND 

SCHOOLS 

1 866 Southern Lane 

Decatur, GA 30033-4097 

(404) 679-4501 http://www.sacscoc.org 
THE ASSOCIATION TO ADVANCE COLLEGIATE SCHOOLS OF BUSINESS (314-872-8481) 

600 Emerson Road, Suite 300 

St. Louis, MO 63141-6762 
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION (312-280-2432) 

50 East Huron Street 

Chicago, IL 60611 
AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION (202-336-5500) 

750 First Street, NE 

Washington, DC 20002-4242 
AMERICAN SPEECH-LANGUAGE-HEARING ASSOCIATION (301-897-5700) 

10801 Rockville Pike 

Rockville, MD 20852 
COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR DIETETICS EDUCATION OF THE AMERICAN 

DIETETIC ASSOCIATION (312-899-0040 Ext. 5400) 

1 20 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000 

Chicago, IL 60606-6995 
COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FORMARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY EDUCATION (202-452-0 109) 

112 South Alfred Street 

Alexandria, VA 22314-3061 
COMMISSION ON COLLEGIATE NURSING EDUCATION (202-887-6791) 

One Dupont Circle NW, Suite 530 

Washington, DC 20036-1120 
COUNCIL FOR ACCREDHATION OF COUNSELING AND RELATED EDUCATION PROGRAMS (703-823-9800) 

5999 Stevenson Avenue 

Alexandria, VA 22304 
COUNCIL ON EDUCATION FOR PUBLIC HEALTH (202-789-1050) 

800 Eye Street, NW, Suite 202 

Washington, DC 20001-3710 
COUNCIL ON SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION (703-683-8080) 

1725 Duke Street, Suite 500 

Alexandria, VA 22314-3457 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION (703-476-3400) 

1900 Association Drive 

Reston, VA 22090 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS (301-657-0270) 

4340 East West Highway, Suite 402 

Bethesda, MD 30814 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF ART AND DESIGN (703-437-0700) 

1 1250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21 

Reston, VA 22090 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF MUSIC (703-437-0700) 

11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21 

Reston, VA 22090 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF THEATRE (703-437-0700) 

1 1250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21 

Reston, VA 22090 




12 



Introduction 



SIS 



mlm 



NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION (202-466-7496) 

2010 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 500 

Washington, DC 20036-1023 
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS 

1 906 Association Drive 

Reston.VA 20191-1502 
NATIONAL SCIENCE TEACHERS ASSOCIATION 

1840 Wilson Boulevard 

Arlington, VA 22201 



Graduate Studies also maintains affiliation with the COUNCIL OF GRADUATE SCHOOLS, One DuPont 
Circle, N.W., Suite 430, Washington, DC 20036-1173, (202)223-3791. 



Graduate Studies 13 



:■■ ■-;■,' 



The Graduate Studies 
Office 

Susan A. Siltanen, Ph.D., Director 

Professor, Speech Communication 

Tammy Adams, Business Analyst 

118 College Drive #5024 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 j|| 

(601) 266-4369 FAX (601) 266-5138 S| 

Email: graduatestudies@usm.edu 3 

www.usm.edu/graduatestudies CI 

g 
The University of Southern Mississippi's responsibilities as a center of higher learning and an faf 

academic environment in which advanced research and free inquiry could develop to the advantage El 
of both the student and the State have increased and flourished. The Graduate Studies Office, H 

which reports to the Provost, was established as the Graduate School in 1947 to recognize the 
university's increasing leadership role in graduate education. In the years since 1947, the 
university's graduate programs have developed logically on the growing points of strong 
undergraduate schools and departments to meet the needs for professional competence beyond the 
academic measure of the baccalaureate degree. 

In 1972, responding to the need to offer graduate programs beyond the boundaries of the Hattiesburg 
campus, the Board of Trustees of the Institutions of Higher Learning authorized the university 
to grant graduate degrees on the campus of The University of Southern Mississippi, Gulf Coast. 
Graduate course work may be taken on the various Gulf Coast campuses, as well as through the 
study-abroad programs. 

Because the university has emerged as a dynamic center of higher learning in which advanced 
research and graduate education flourish in symbiotic fashion, the Southern Regional Education 
Board and Carnegie Foundation bestow upon the university their highest rankings. The University 
of Southern Mississippi is an SREB Four- Year I institution, and is recognized by the Carnegie 
Foundation as a Comprehensive Doctoral institution. 

The Graduate Council 

The Graduate Council determines policies pertaining to graduate education at the university. It 
includes elected members from the various degree-granting colleges. Permanent ex officio members 
are the president of the university and the university librarian. The council elects a chair from its 
regular members. The university registrar serves as recording secretary of the council. The council's 
bylaws and the "Index to Graduate Council Decisions" are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies. 

The responsibilities of the Graduate Council include: 

1. Determining policies of admission to graduate study at Southern Miss. 

2. Considering and approving graduate programs submitted to the council through curriculum 
committees of each college. 

3. Electing members of the graduate faculty upon recommendation by the academic deans. 

4. Approving new courses, modifying existing courses, and deleting courses for graduate credit 
including online courses. 

5. Acting upon any other issues affecting graduate programs. 

The graduate programs approved by the council are carried out through the graduate faculty in each 
degree-granting college of the university's academic organization. 



14 



Graduate Studies 



iiiiia 



ilii 



Graduate Admissions (U.S. citizens) 

Shonna Breland, Manager of Graduate Admissions 
The University of Southern Mississippi 
118 College Drive #10066 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5137 

All U.S. citizens applying to graduate programs offered on all Southern Miss campuses should apply 
online or send their application form, transcripts from all universities attended, application fee, and 
test scores to Graduate Admissions. Letters of recommendation and all other required admission 
materials should be sent to the department or school to which the student is applying. Students 
applying to more than one department should send letters of recommendation and all other material 
to both departments. 

International Student Applications 

Barbara Whirt Jackson, Administrator, International Student and Scholar Services 

The University of Southern Mississippi 

118 College Drive #5151 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

USA (601) 266-4841 

fax (601) 266-5839 

email: iss@usm.edu 



International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) coordinates all facets of international admissions 
and student services. ISSS provides counseling on immigration regulations, personal matters, 
culture shock and adjustment, as well as some academic counseling in conjunction with the various 
departments. ISSS processes all international applications, evaluates foreign academic credentials, 
and issues the appropriate immigration documents for non-immigrant foreign students. Multi-cultural 
programming for international students and the community is also coordinated by the office. 

All international students applying to graduate programs offered on all Southern Miss campuses 
should send their application form, transcripts from all universities attended, application fee, and test 
scores to International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS). In addition, please send all letters of 
recommendation and all other required admission materials to ISSS. 

Graduate Degree Requirement Processing, Auditing, and 
Tracking 

Sandra C. Carter, Senior Degree Auditor and Tracking Specialist 

Sue Fayard, Degree Auditor and Tracking Specialist 

Joyce Sanders, Graduate Reader 

The University of Southern Mississippi 

118 College Drive #5024 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4369 

The degree auditors and tracking specialists maintain the plan of study, advising transcripts, process 
all milestone information (e.g., comprehensive exam results) and grade changes, and do the final 
degree audit before posting the degree. The graduate reader manages the processing of theses and 
dissertations from initial committee appointments to the final proofreading. The reader also sends 
copies of the theses and dissertations to the bindery. See www.usm.edu/graduatestudies for specific 
information on plan of study forms, deadlines, and dissertation/thesis guidelines. 

Graduate Student Association 

President, GSA 

Gradaute Student Advisory Council Chair, GSAC 

The University of Southern Mississippi 

118 College Drive #5024 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4369 



The Graduate Student Association invites all graduate students to join. The GSA sponsors a variety 
of activities including lectures and informal gatherings. It is affiliated with the National Association 
of Graduate and Professional Students. The Graduate Student Advisory Council is an appointed 
group that works with and advises the University Director of Graduate Studies on issues affecting 
graduate students. 



Graduate Studies 15 



Degree Programs Offered* 



The University of Southern Mississippi offers graduate-level programs in nearly every recognized 
academic discipline. Even those departments that do not offer master's or doctoral degrees can offer 
a graduate minor. In addition, some graduate degrees are offered at the Gulf Coast campus. For 
specific information about the graduate programs at Gulf Coast, please see the Gulf Coast section 
in the Bulletin. 

Master's degrees provide broad-based advanced knowledge, training, and an understanding of 
research, and/or creative or problem-solving activities in a discipline that will enable the recipients 
to contribute to their disciplines and professions. 

Specialist degrees provide more advanced knowledge, problem-solving skills, and training needed 
to contribute to a discipline with greater emphasis on skill development and integration of applied 
research. 

Doctoral degrees are research degrees that provide (a) specialized, advanced knowledge of a 
discipline, (b) an ability to integrate a specialized field of study into the larger areas of knowledge, 
and (c) the critical, analytical, and/or problem-solving tools needed to produce original, independent 
scholarly research or creative work in a discipline, thus contributing to the discipline's body of 
knowledge. 

The degrees which are offered and their majors are listed below. Refer to each department for 
emphasis areas or www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/planofstudy.php. 

*Please note that degree offerings may change due to current program reviews. Those listed in this Bulletin 

are those granted as of the 2007-2008 academic year. 

Check www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/planofstudy.php for current offerings. 



tSsmM 

Hi 
111 



Degrees Offered 

Doctor of Audiology (AuD) 

Doctor of Education (EdD) 

Education: Adult Education 
Education: Curriculum and Instruction 
Education: Educational Administration 
Education: Special Education 

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 

Administration of Justice 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Coastal Sciences 

Communication: Mass Communication 

Communication: Speech Communication 

Computational Science: Computer Science 

Computational Science: Mathematics 

Computational Science: Physics 

Education: Adult Education 

Education: Curriculum and Instruction 

Education: Educational Administration 

Education: Special Education 

English 

Geography 



Higher Education Administration 



Higher Education Administration 
History 

Human Capital Development 
Human Performance 
International Development 
Marine Science 
Music Education 
Nursing 

Nutrition and Food Systems 
Polymer Science and Engineering 
Psychology 
Science Education 
Sports and High Performance 
Materials 



Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) 
Specialist in Education (EdS) 

Adult Education 

Educational Curriculum and Instruction 
Educational Administration 
Educational Research 



Higher Education Administration 
Special Education 



16 | Graduate Studies 



Specialist in Library and Information Science (SLIS) 
Master of Art Education (MAEd) 



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Master of Arts (MA) 

Administration of Justice 
Anthropology 

Communication: Mass Communication 
Communication: Speech Communication 
English 
Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) 

Master of Arts in Teaching of Language (MATL) 

Master of Business Administration (MBA) 

Master of Education (MEd) 

Adult Education 

Counseling and Personnel Services 

Educational Administration 

Master of Fine Arts (MFA) 



History 

Philosophy 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Speech and Hearing Sciences 



Educational Curriculum and 

Instruction 
Special Education 

Theatre 



Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) 
Master of Music (MM) 

Master of Music Education (MME) 

Master of Professional Accountancy (MPA) 

Master of Public Health (MPH) 

Master of Science (MS) 

Administration of Justice 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Child and Family Studies 

Coastal Sciences 

Communication: Mass Communication 

Communication: Speech Communication 

Computer Science 

Counseling Psychology 

Early Intervention 

Economic Development 

Educational Curriculum 

and Instruction 
Engineering Technology: Construction 

Management 
Engineering Technology: Architectural 

Construction Visualization 
Engineering Technology: Logistics 

Management Technology 
Geography 
Geology 
History 

Human Performance 
Hydrographic Science 
Interscholastic Athletic Administration 



Instructional Technology 
Marine Science 
Marriage and Family Therapy 
Mathematics 
Medical Technology 
Nutrition and Food Systems 
Physics 

Political Science 
Polymer Science 
Psychology 
Public Relations 

Recreation and Leisure Management 
Science Education 
Special Education 
Sport Coaching Education 
Sport and High Performance Materials 
Speech and Hearing Sciences 
Sport Management 
Technology Education 
Workforce Training and 
Development 



Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) 
Master of Social Work (MSW) 



Admission Requirements and Procedures 17 



Admission Requirements 
and Procedures 

Since students must always be admitted to a specific program, all applications are closely reviewed and 
must be approved by faculty and the chair of the department in which the student intends to study by 
the college dean and the director of Graduate Studies. U.S. citizens should obtain admission forms and 
should submit them to Graduate Admissions. Students may apply online by going to www.usm.edu/ 
graduatestudies.International applicants should obtain admission forms from the Office of International 
Student and Scholar Services. (See the International Student Applications section of the Bulletin for 
specific details). 

Most programs require that applicants submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general section 
scores (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing). However, programs in the College of Business 
require that applicants take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Some master's 
programs in the College of Education and Psychology accept the Miller Analogies Test (MAT); 
and in the College of Health, some programs accept GRE, the GMAT and the MCAT. Prospective 
students should plan to take the appropriate examination early in their senior year of college, and they 
should request that a copy of their scores be sent to Graduate Admissions. The university's testing 
center offers all of the tests. For additional information, call 266-6123. 

Admission decisions result from evaluation of quantitative and qualitative information submitted by 
the applicant or submitted at the applicant's request. In addition to test scores, applicants must provide 
a completed application form and official transcripts from all institutions attended. The applicant 
must provide letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness 
for graduate study. Some programs require submission of a writing sample and/or a personal essay; 
others require that the applicant participate in interviews and/or auditions. All application materials 
are reviewed and contribute to admission decisions. A decision to accept an applicant into a graduate 
degree program is based upon the quality of his or her previous academic experience, as well as the 
applicant's purpose of study, the appropriateness of the applicant's purpose when weighed against 
the strengths of a program, and the recommendations of the faculty in the proposed field of study. In 
some programs, prior professional and employment activities are also considered. 

The academic record, character, and conditions of the applicant must be in accordance with the 
rules and regulations of the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning 
and with the laws of the state of Mississippi. The applicant must have excellent moral character in 
conformity with the generally accepted standards customarily in effect at the university'. 

The university reserves the right to cancel the admission or registration of an individual whose 
attendance at the university, in the opinion of the appropriate administrative officer and the president, 
would not be beneficial to the student and/or to the institution. Students admitted to a graduate 
degree program may not pursue a second graduate degree concurrently unless the dual 
graduate degrees are approved and listed in the Graduate Bulletin. Students may not pursue a 
second undergraduate degree while pursuing a graduate degree. 

Admission Review 

Any student who is denied admission, whose admission is suspended, who questions the type of 
admission granted, or whose admission status is changed after matriculation, may have his or her 
case reviewed by the Graduate Admissions and Credits Committee. Any request for review must be 
made within one year of the date of the denial or suspension. Students should contact the University 
Director of Graduate Studies for specific procedures, 601-266-4369. 

If should be clearly understood that the admission requirements listed below represent the 
minimal standards set by the Graduate Council and that additional requirements and higher 
standards may well be stipulated by the various departments. Applicants should check for such 
requirements in the departmental section of the Bulletin. 

Deadlines for Graduate Admission Application 



111 



The admission application deadlines are posted on the Graduate Studies Office Web page 
(www. usm. edu/graduatestudies). 

All materials, including test scores and transcripts, must be received by Graduate Admissions by the 
deadline, 118 College Drive, Box 10066, Hartiesburg, MS 39406-0001. 



18 



Admission Requirements and Procedures 




Types of Admission to Master's Programs 

Master's degree provide broad-based advanced knowledge, training, and an understanding of research, 
and/or creative or problem-solving activities in a discipline that will enable the recipients to contribute to 
their disciplines and professions. 

An applicant may be granted regular or conditional admission to a masters program. 



I. 



II. 



Regular Admission 

Minimum Standards for Regular Admission are as follows: 

A. The applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree from an institution approved by a 
recognized accrediting agency. 

The applicant must be eligible to re-enter in good standing the last college or university 
attended. 

The applicant must present evidence, by official transcript, of a grade point average equivalent 
to at least 2.75 (calculated on a 4.0 scale) for the last two years of undergraduate study, and a 
grade point average of at least 3.0 on undergraduate courses in the field of proposed graduate 
study. 

The applicant must have at least three (3) letters of recommendation from persons qualified to 
assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study sent to the department/school. If applying 
to more than one department, students must have letters sent to each department/school. 
Applicants must have standardized test scores (GRE, GMAT, or MAT or other approved 
graduate admission test) sent to Graduate Admissions. Consult specific departmental 
requirements for additional information. 

Applicants must submit other materials specified by departments, e.g., writing samples, 
statement of purpose, audition, licenses, and/or resumes. See specific departmental requirements 
for this information. 

The appropriate department chair, college dean and the University Director of Graduate 
Studies must be satisfied that the applicant shows promise of satisfying master's degree 
requirements. 

International students must submit TOEFL scores. 
Applicant must pay application fee. 



B. 



D 



F. 



Conditional Admission 

A student who fails to qualify for regular admission may be admitted on a conditional basis; provided, 
however, such a student possesses a grade point average of at least 2.50 (calculated on a 4.0 scale). 
Conditional admission can be given only upon the recommendation of the department chair, the college 
dean, and the University Director of Graduate Studies. 



A masters student admitted conditionally must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0 on the 
first nine (9) hours of coursework at or above the 500 level. If, prior to satisfying the requirements 
to have the conditional status removed, the student attempts more than 9 hours of coursework at or 
above the 500 level, he or she must achieve a 3.0 overall grade point average on all course work. 
Lower-level coursework (500) taken to remedy perceived deficiencies may not be counted toward 
the nine-hour requirement. All courses taken to remove conditional status must be taken on a campus 
of the The University of Southern Mississippi. 



Additional requirements may be imposed by the department, 
department chair to be clear about such requirements. 



The student should meet with the 



All requirements must be met or the student will not be allowed to continue to seek a master's degree. 
Upon the recommendation of the department chair and with the approval of the dean, the student will 
be reclassified as a regularly admitted student. A student not maintaining the required grade point 
average or otherwise failing to satisfy any additional requirements will be discontinued. 



Admission Requirements and Procedures [j 



19 



Types of Admission to Specialist's Programs 

Specialist degrees provide more advanced knowledge, problem-solving skills, and training needed to 
contribute to a discipline with greater emphasis on skill development and integration of applied research. 

Advanced graduate programs leading to the specialist's degree are available to qualified students. An 
applicant may be granted regular or conditional admission to these programs. 

I. Regular Admission 

Minimum standards for regular admission are as follows: 

A. The applicant must hold a master's degree from an institution approved by a recognized 
accrediting agency. 

B. The applicant must be eligible to re-enter in good standing the last college or university 
attended. 

C. The applicant must present evidence, by official transcript, of a grade point average of no 
lower than 3.25 (calculated on a 4.0 scale) on previous graduate work. Applicants must also 
submit official transcripts from all other institutions they attended. 

D. The applicant must have at least three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to 
assess the applicant's readiness for specialist work. If applying to more than one department, 
students must ask references to send letters to each department. 

E. Applicants must have results irom the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
unless the department requires the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). Consult specific departments for 
additional information. 

F. Applicants must submit other materials specified by departments, e.g., writing samples, 
statement of purpose, auditions, licenses, and/or resumes. See specific departmental 
requirements for this information. 

G. The appropriate department chair, college dean, and the University Director of Graduate 
Studies must be satisfied that the applicant shows promise of satisfying specialist's degree 
requirements. 

H. International students must submit TOEFL scores. 
I. Applicant must pay application fee. 

II. Conditional Admission 

A student who fails to qualify for regular admission may be admitted on a conditional basis; provided, 
however, such a student possesses a grade point average of at least 3.00 on previous graduate course 
work. Conditional admission can be given only upon the recommendation of the department chair, 
the college dean, and the University Director of Graduate Studies. 

A specialist student admitted conditionally must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.25 on the 
first nine (9) hours of coursework at or above the 600 level. If, prior to satisfying the requirements 
to have the conditional status removed, the student attempts more than 9 hours of coursework at or 
above the 600 level, he or she must achieve a 3.25 overall grade point average on all course work. 
All courses taken to remove conditional status must be taken on a campus of the The University of 
Southern Mississippi. 






Additional requirements may be imposed by the department, 
department chair to be clear about such requirements. 



The student should meet with the 



All requirements must be met or the student will not be allowed to continue to seek a specialist's 
degree. Upon the recommendation of the department chair and with the approval of the dean, the 
student will be reclassified as a regularly admitted student. A student not maintaining the required 
grade point average or otherwise failing to satisfy any additional requirements, will be 
discontinued. 



20 J Admission Requirements and Procedures 




Types of Admission to Doctoral Programs 

Doctoral degrees are research degrees that provide (a) specialized, advanced knowledge of a discipline, (b) 
an ability to integrate a specialized field of study into the larger areas of knowledge, and (c) the critical, 
analytical, and/or problem-solving tools needed to produce original, independent scholarly research or 
creative work in a discipline, thus contributing to the discipline's body of knowledge. 

Advanced graduate programs leading to the doctoral degree are available to qualified students. An 
applicant may be granted regular or conditional admission to these programs. 

II. Regular Admission 

Minimum standards for regular admission are as follows: 

A. The applicant must hold a master's degree from an institution approved by a recognized 
accrediting agency. 

B. The applicant must be eligible to re-enter in good standing the last college or university 
attended. 

C. The applicant must present evidence, by official transcript, of a grade point average of no 
lower than 3.50 (calculated on a 4.0 scale) on previous graduate course work. Applicants must 
also submit official transcripts from all other institutions they attended. 

D. The applicant must have at least three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to 
assess the applicant's readiness for doctoral work. If applying to more than one department, 
students must ask references to send letters to each department. 

E. Applicants must have results from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) sent 
to Graduate Admissions. 

F. Applicants must submit other materials specified by departments, e.g., writing samples, 
statement of purpose, auditions, licenses, and/or resumes. See specific departmental 
requirements for additional information. 

G. The appropriate department chair and college dean must be satisfied that the applicant shows 
promise of satisfying doctoral degree requirements. 

II. International students must submit TOEFL scores. 
I. Applicant must pay application fee. 

i IT. Conditional Admission 

A student who fails to qualify for regular admission may be admitted on a conditional basis; provided, 
however, such a student possesses a grade point average of at least a 3.25. Conditional admission can 
be given only upon the recommendation of the department chair and the college dean. 

A doctoral student admitted conditionally must maintain a grade point average of at least 3.5 on the 
first nine (9) hours of coursework at or above the 600 level. If, prior to satisfying the requirements 
to have the conditional status removed, the student attempts more than 9 hours of coursework 
at or above the 600 level, he or she must achieve a 3.5 overall grade point average. All courses 
taken to remove conditional status must be taken on a campus of die The University of Southern 
Mississippi. 

Additional requirements may be imposed by the department. The student should meet with the 
department chair to be clear about such requirements. 

All requirements must be met or tine student will not be allowed to continue to seek a doctoral 
degree. Upon the recommendation of the department chair and with the approval of the dean, 
the student will be reclassified as a regularly admitted student. A student not maintaining the 
required grade point average or otherwise failing to satisfy any additional requirements, will be 
discontinued. 



Admission Requirements and Procedures j 21 



Regulations Governing Non-Degree Graduate Students 

Students must apply for non-degree status by submitting the application form, proof of degree, and their 
application fee to Graduate Admissions. 

Permission to take courses as a non-degree graduate student may be granted for any of the following 
reasons: 

A. The student did not meet requirements for conditional or regular admission before the deadline 
These admission requirements must be met and the non-degree status changed to conditional or 
regular by the end of the first full semester after the student enrolls in graduate courses in order to 
continue course work. Permission from the department offering the course,the dean, and University 
Director of Graduate Studies must be secured in order to register for the course. 

B. The student may or may not be able to meet admission requirements but does not desire to work 
toward a graduate degree. For example, an individual may wish to take courses for licensure or to 
earn a certificate. 

C. The student is enrolled in anoUier university and desires to obtain credit from The University of 
Southern Mississippi to be transferred to the university in which he or she is seeking a degree. 

D. Students who have been denied admission to a program, but who wish to take graduate courses, 
may request permission to take courses as a non-degree seeking graduate student. They must have 
the permission of the chair of the department offering the course, the dean, and University Director 
of Graduate Studies to register for any graduate course. 

Even though a non-degree graduate student is allowed to take courses at the university, he or she has not 
been admitted to any department or to any degree program. Moreover, no credit earned beyond the master's 
degree while classified as a non-degree student may be applied toward the doctoral degree. Non-degree 
graduate students must have the permission of the chair of the department offering the course, the dean, 
and the University Director of Graduate Studies to register for any graduate course. Students should come 
to the Graduate Studies Office for processing. 

A non-degree graduate student must hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. Non- 
degree graduate students are not eligible for financial aid. 

To be allowed to continue as a non-degree graduate student, the student must consult with the 
department chair or academic adviser of the department in which he or she is taking courses during 
die first semester enrolled at the university regardless of whether or not the student plans to seek a 
degree. 

No more than nine semester hours earned while classified as a non-degree graduate student will 
be accepted toward a master's degree at The University of Southern Mississippi. A student must, 
therefore, gain conditional or regular admission before completing more than nine semester hours 
of study. 

An applicant for specialist's and doctoral degrees may take courses as a non-degree graduate student 
if the department chair, dean, and the University Director of Graduate Studies give their permission. 
However, no credit earned as a non-degree graduate student may be applied to doctoral degrees. 
All non-degree graduate students at the advanced level must have the permission of the chair of the 
department offering the course and the dean, and University Director of Graduate Studies to register 
for any graduate course. 



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Graduate Certificate Programs 

Credit Hours 

Graduate certificate programs must have a minimum of 1 5 credit hours. 



22 | Admission Requirements and Procedures 



mill 

MPtS 



Admission Requirements 

1) Applicants must complete the Application for Admission for Graduate Studies, indicating Non- 
Degree under Academic Status , and submit the application to the Graduate Studies Office, 118 
College Drive #10066, Hattiesburg, MS 39406. Applicants must submit a letter of application to 
the academic unit in which the certificate program is housed to the Graduate Studies Office if 
certificate program is University wide. 

2) The applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree from an institution approved by a recognized 
accrediting agency. Some certificate programs require the application to hold a master's degree or 
to be currently enrolled in a gradaute degree program. 

3) The applicant must submit official transcripts from the institution awarding the baccalaureate 
degree. 

4) The applicant must be able to re-enter in good standing the last college or university attended. 

5) The appropriate department chair (or program director in the case of interdisciplinary certificate 
program) college dean, and the University Director of Graduate Studies must be satisfied that the 
applicant shows promise of satisfying the certificate program requirements. 

6) The applicant must pay the application fee. 
Programs Requirements 

To complete the certificate program, students must 

1) complete credit hour and course requirements with a 3.0 GPA 

2) complete program requirements within four years 

Credit Hour Limitations 

No more than nine (9) semester hours of work from the certificate program may be used toward 
a master's degree. No more than twelve (12) semester hours of work from the certificate program 
may be used toward a doctoral degree. 

Limitations on University Faculty Members 

Members of the faculty of The University of Southern Mississippi above the rank of instructor cannot 
become candidates for a doctoral degree at the institution. They may, however, enroll for graduate 
courses as a non-degree student. Faculty members of the rank of instructor may become candidates 
for doctoral degrees at The University of Southern Mississippi on the same terms as any other 
advanced graduate student candidate. 

Permission for Undergraduate Seniors to Register for 
Graduate Credit 

Exceptionally well-qualified undergraduate students at The University of Southern Mississippi 
may apply to the Graduate Studies Office for permission to take course work for graduate credit if 
they are within nine semester hours of meeting bachelor's degree requirements as certified by the 
university registrar. If approved, the student may then register for graduate courses up to a maximum 
of six semester hours of graduate credit with a total course load not exceeding 12 semester hours. 
The student must complete requirements for the baccalaureate degree within the first semester/term 
in which he or she registers for graduate courses. The student's application for admission will not 
be given final approval until after he or she satisfies all requirements for the baccalaureate degree. 
Undergraduate students taking graduate courses must receive permission from the department chair 
and the University Director of Graduate Studies. They must complete a non-degree form for each 
graduate course they take. They must complete a graduate application and submit these materials to 
graduate admissions. 

An undergraduate student from another institution desiring to take graduate courses as listed 
above should file a graduate application, have a transcript sent to graduate admissions, and receive 
permission from the department chair and university director of Graduate Studies to take a graduate 
class. 



Admission Requirements and Procedures jj 23 



Graduate Students Taking Undergraduate Courses 

Graduate students enrolled in undergraduate courses must complete the "Out of Career" permission 
form available in the Graduate Studies Office and receive permission from their department chair and 
the university director of Graduate Studies. Graduate students taking undergraduate courses should 
be aware that such courses are considered "out of career" and might not count toward eligibility 
for financial assistance or the calculation of full-time status. Although graduate students taking 
undergraduate courses will receive a grade for the coursework, they will not receive quality points; 
the absence of quality points may negatively impact the ability of the student to count the course(s) 
for credit when seeking licensure or certification. It is the responsibility of the student to determine 
how the course will affect his/her status and future plans. Students should contact the Graduate 
Studies Office if they have questions. Students may not earn an undergraduate degree while earning 
a graduate degree. 

Procedures for Applying for Admission (U.S. citizens) 

Students must submit a new application for each program and/or degree sought: master's, 
specialist's, and doctoral. 

All credentials (application, an official transcript from each institution attended, and standardized 
test scores) must be submitted to Graduate Admissions by the deadline published in the University 
Calendar, or the departmental deadline. Letters of recommendation and other required materials 
should be sent directly to the department. If applying to more than one department, students should 
have letters sent to all departments. 

All applicants must pay a $30 application fee. Send checks or money orders to the Graduate Studies 
Office. 

After all credentials are received, graduate admissions office will compute the applicant's grade 
point average for the last 60 hours of baccalaureate classwork and will forward the application and 
transcripts to the appropriate department chair. As soon as the application has been processed by the 
department chair, the college dean, and the University coordinator of Gradaute Studies, the Office of 
Graduate Studies will notify the applicant of the university's decision on the request for admission. 
The letter from the Graduate Studies Office is the official letter of admission. 

An applicant's admission status is good for a maximum of one year. However, some departments 
require a new application if the student does not enroll the semester he/she is admitted. Once a 
student's admission window closes, all papenvork (transcripts, etc.) is shredded, and a student must 
again apply for admission (not readmission). 

F. Students whose native language is not English and have recently come to the United States are 
required to take the TOEFL exam to demonstrate English proficiency. 

G. If bom after 1956, a Certificate of Compliance is required. International students may have 
additional requirements (contact International Student and Scholar Services). 

International Admissions 

International Student and Scholar Services 



A. 



B 



C. 



D. 



E. 



pi 

§33§ 

tits 



Barbara Jackson, Administrator 

118 College Drive #5151 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

U.S.A. 

(601) 266-4841 

fax (601) 266-4898 

www.usni.edu/internarionaledu/isss_l/isss_home.htm 

isss@usm.edu 

International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) coordinates all facets of international admissions 
and student services. ISSS provides counseling on immigration regulations, personal matters, 
culture shock and adjustment, as well as some academic counseling in conjunction with the various 
departments. ISSS processes all international applications, evaluates foreign academic credentials, 
and issues the appropriate immigration documents for non-immigrant foreign students. Multi-cultural 
programming for international students and the community is also coordinated by the office. 

ISSS disseminates Southern Miss information to foreign schools, U.S. embassies/consulates abroad, 
and non-profit international organizations (such as the Institute for International Education). This 
office also provides information to and immigration documents for research scholars invited by 



24 J) Admission Requirements and Procedures 



Southern Miss to participate in research opportunities. For further information, contact 

The University of Southern Mississippi 

Barbara Whitt Jackson, Administrator 

International Student and Scholar Services 

118 College Drive #5151 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

U.S.A. 

Tel. (601) 266-4841 FAX (601) 266-5839 

Internet: http://ww\v. usm.edu/international/ISSS_l/isss_home. htm 

e-mail: isss@usm.edu 

English Language Proficiency: Applicants whose native language is not English must present 
the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Exceptions may be made if the 
applicant has earned a degree at an accredited U.S. college or university. TOEFL requirements 
vary from program to program. See admission requirements for international students under the 
department listings for specific TOEFL requirements. 

English Instruction: Applicants without English language proficiency can consider enrolling in 
the university's English Language Institute prior to academic enrollment. For more information, 
write The University of Southern Mississippi, English Language Institute, 118 College Drive 
#5065, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001, USA or email eli@usm.edu. 

Admission Materials: Applicants must submit all application materials required by the 
departments to the ISSS Office. Graduate test scores (GRE or GMAT, depending on department) are 
also required. Official transcripts with degrees posted must be submitted for each school attended. 
These documents should be submitted in their native language with a certified English translation. 

Financial Resources: In order to meet requirements for entry into the United States for study, 
applicants are required by federal law to demonstrate sufficient financial resources. Students 
must be prepared to provide proof that he/she has sufficient funds to cover the first year of study. 
In addition, students must demonstrate financial solvency for future years of study to establish 
that he/she will not become a public charge. Applicants must provide documented evidence of 
their financial resources for university study since the university has no special fund for financial 
assistance to international students. 

Admission Procedure: 

1. Write to The University of Southern Mississippi, International Student and Scholar Services, 
118 College Drive #5151, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 USA for information and application 
forms to the university's graduate programs. 

2. Complete the forms properly and return them with the application fee to the address above. The 
application and supporting documents must be received no later than two months prior to the 
registration date desired. 

3. Have all official transcripts and diplomas from all former institutions attended sent to 
International Student and Scholar Services. Please note: photocopies are NOT acceptable. 
Transcripts should be in native language with certified English uanslations. 

4. Have all appropriate test scores sent to International Student and Scholar Services. 

5. Have at least three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness for graduate study sent to International Student and Scholar Services. 

6. After all application materials are received, the applicant's file will be sent to the appropriate 
department and college dean. The Graduate Studies Office will notify the applicants of the 
admission decision. The letter from the Graduate Studies Office is the official letter of admission. 

7. Application materials submitted to the university will not be returned. 

A Certificate of Eligibility for exchange Visitor Status (Form DS2019 for a J-l visa) or a 
Certificate of Eligibility for Student Status (Form 1-20 for an F-l visa) is issued only to those 
applicants who have been officially admitted to the university. 



Admission Requirements and Procedures j 25 



Immunization Requirements 

All students (including transfers) entering the university for the first time and enrolling for academic 
credit must document proof of immunization for measles and rubella. 

1 . Proof of immunization may be documented in the following manner: 

a. Obtain a Certificate of Compliance with Immunization (Form No. 121-C) from your 
local Mississippi State Board of Health office, if you are a resident of the state of 
Mississippi. Two doses of measles vaccine are required. All international students must 
have a chest X-ray to screen for tuberculosis; 

b. Documentation (month and year) of immunization that was received after the first 
birthday; 

c. Positive measles and rubella serology titer with date; 

d. Physician-documented history of having had measles with date of disease. History of 
rubella is not acceptable. 

2. Temporary exceptions - one semester: 

a. Pregnant women 

b. Women suspecting pregnancy 

c. Women anticipating pregnancy within three months 

3. Permanent exceptions: 

a. Medical disease that will cause a permanent contraindication to immunization 

b. All persons born prior to 1957 

If born after 1 956, a Certificate of Compliance is required. International students may have additional 
requirements. 



26 j General Degree Requirements 



II 



in. 



IV. 




General Degree Requirements 

Master's Degree Requirements 

Master's degree provide advanced broad-based knowledge, training, and an understanding of research, 

and/or creative or problem-solving activities in a discipline that will enable the recipients to contribute to 

their disciplines and professions. 

I. Credit Hours 

A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours credit is required for any master's degree. Many departments 
require more than the minimum. Consult specific departmental requirements for additional information. 
A 3.0 GPA in the master's program and no grade below a "C" are required for graduation. 
Plan Of Study Form 

Students must submit a "plan of study" form to the Graduate Studies Office by their first 
semester of enrollment. See www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/planofstud y. 
Time Limitation 

The student must complete the master's degree within six calendar years from the date of initial 
enrollment in a graduate program. Six years is the maximum age allowed for graduate credits 
toward a master's degree. The Graduate Studies Office, under extenuating circumstances, and 
special petition, may approve revalidation of over-age credit hours if the original credit was earned 
at The University of Southern Mississippi and if the department chair approves the revalidation. The 
revalidation is secured by the student's successfully passing a special examination on the course. 
However, any student who fails to complete the master's degree program within the six-year time 
period becomes subject to any changes in degree requirements made at any date six years prior to 
graduation. The fee charged for the special revalidation examination is to be paid before the revali- 
dation examination is taken. Over-age extension and transfer courses cannot be revalidated. Revalidation 
forms are available in the Graduate Studies Office. 
Credit Hours Limitations 

A. A minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours must be in courses numbered 600 or above. 

B. A total of no more than nine (9) semester hours of work earned as a non-degree student may be 
applied toward a master's degree. Please note D below. 

As many as six (6) semester hours of graduate credit from other accredited institutions may be 
transferred to the student's program with the approval of the appropriate department chair and dean 
provided that the course work transferred falls within the six-year period allowed for the degree. Such 
course work must carry a letter or numeric grade of "B" or better and not counted toward another 
graduate degree and cannot be a pass/fail course. 

A total sum of no more than nine (9) semester hours of transfer work and non-degree work may 
be applied toward a master's degree. 

The Master's Committee 

The student's work toward the master's degree is either supervised by a departmental committee 
comprised of a chair and at least two members recommended by the department chair and appointed 
by the Graduate Studies Office or by an experienced faculty adviser. The committee appointment 
form should be sent to the Graduate Studies Office. The form is located on the Web at 
www.usm.edu/gradautestudies. 
The Minor Field 

If a minor field is required in the master's program, it shall consist of nine (9) semester hours of 
graduate course work and may consist of courses from a number of related areas. Some disciplines 
define their own minor and may require more than nine (9) semester hours to complete the minor. The 
minor department must be consulted to determine specific requirements. 
Continuous Enrollment 

Students are expected to enroll continuously after they have taken required course work until they 
complete their degree. They may enroll as stipulated below. 

A. Students must enroll for one (1) hour if they are using university services, e.g., library and/or 
technology services, consulting their thesis/project advisor. 

Students must register for three (3) hours of 698 or project hours during the semester/term they 
expect to defend and complete the thesis or project. All required course work must be completed 
before the semester in which the student defends the thesis. The diesis must be deposited in 
the Graduate Studies Office or the final project given to the major professor. See www.usm. 
edu/graduatestudies for deadlines. 

Students must register for one (1) hour of 697 or project hour the next semester/term if they 
have not deposited the thesis in the Graduate Studies Office or submitted final project to their 
department. 

Failure to enroll for the appropriate hours will result in the students being discontinued from 
Southern Miss and will require that the student reapply for admission to the program. 



V. 



VI. 



VII. 



c. 



D. 



B. 



C. 



Genera! Degree Requirements 



27 



B. 



C. 



D. Leave of Absence 

Under special circumstances such as illness, family hardship, or military service, a student 
may request a leave of absence. Leaves of absence will be granted for one semester or longer 
as circumstances warrant. Requests for a leave of absence should be submitted in writing to 
the department chair or director. The chair will then forward his or her recommendation to the 
Graduate Studies Office. The university director of Graduate Studies will notify the student and 
chair or director of the decision. Normally, requests should be submitted at least one semester 
before the leave of absence. 
VIII. The Master's Thesis 

A. The master of arts degree entails the writing of a thesis (698. Thesis, 6 hrs. required). For 
the degrees of master of science and master of education, some programs offer a non-thesis 
option. Students intending to pursue a degree higher than the master's are encouraged to write 
a thesis. 

Thesis committee comprised of three graduate faculty members is recommended by the 
department chair and appointed by the University Director of Graduate Studies. The Committee 
Appointment form should be sent to the Graduate Studies Office. The thesis prospectus approval 
form should be sent to the graduate degree auditor when the student's thesis prospectus is 
approved 

As appropriate, the Institutional Review Board and/or the Institutional Animal Care and Use 
Committee must approve the thesis methodology before the thesis is begun. The signed approval 
forms and approval letter must be included in an appendix. (See The Institutional Review Board 
in Bulletin) www.usm.edufgraduatestudies. 

D. Guidelines for the preparation of theses is available on the Web at www. iism.edu/gradaatestudies. 

E. Oral Defense of Thesis. After the thesis has been accepted and after all required course work has 
been completed, a final oral examination on the thesis will be conducted by the student's thesis 
committee and any other faculty members designated by the University director of Graduate 
Studies. The examination will be open to any member of the graduate faculty. The thesis 
committee chair should submit the results of the oral defense of the thesis form to the Graduate 
Studies Office immediately following the defense. A copy of the thesis title page should also be 
submitted to the Graduate Reader. 

F. Students are responsible for meeting the thesis deadlines that are listed on the thesis-dissertation 
deadline schedule in the Bulletin and at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies. If a student fails to 
deposit the thesis in the Graduate Studies Office in accordance with the published schedule, 
the degree will be awarded in the next semester, and the student must enroll for 1 hour of 698 
(thesis). 

FX. Foreign Language 

Some master's degree programs include a foreign language requirement. Students should refer to 
the section of the Bulletin describing individual departments and schools to determine whether 
specific requirements have been established for a program of interest A student may demonstrate 
proficiency in a foreign language by any of several options; the particular option followed by the 
student must have the approval of the student's advisory committee and the university director of 
Graduate Studies The options are as follows: 

A. Completion of six (6) graduate semester hours with grades of C or better in one of the 
following language sequences: FRE 501-502, SPA 501-502, or GER 501-502. These 
courses are specifically designed to meet The University of Southern Mississippi foreign 
language requirements. 

B. Completion of nine (9) semester hours (undergraduate or graduate) with grades of C or 
better in an approved foreign language. The courses listed above in option A may not be 
included as part of these nine hours. The student may transfer these hours from an accredited 
institution upon admission, provided that the most advanced of the courses was taken within 
the last six (6) calendar years. After admission, courses taken to satisfy the foreign language 
requirement by this option must be taken at The University of Southern Mississippi or at 
another accredited institution if written approval to take the specific courses at the institution 
is obtained from the student's advisory committee, the chair of the Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures, and the Graduate Studies Office. 

C. Students may successfully complete the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) test 
in French, Spanish, or German. The CLEP can be taken at many sites. Students must obtain 
a minimum score on the total test in one of the languages as follows: French 43; German 
39, Spanish 48. 

D. Students whose first language is not English may use English to fulfill the proficiency 
requirement for one language by scoring in the 65th percentile (scaled score = 560 or 
higher) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language. 

E. Students fulfill the proficiency requirement for one language if they have completed an 
undergraduate major or a master's degree in a foreign language at any time. 



glP3 
m 



i : - 



28 |j General Degree Requirements 




F. Use of another method for demonstrating proficiencies must be recommended and approved 
by the student's advisory committee and the University Director of Graduate Studies 
Office. 

X. Comprehensive Exam 

In addition to regular examinations, final comprehensive examinations are required for all master's 
degrees. The major department will determine whether the comprehensive examination will be 
written or oral or both. The written comprehensive, if required, will be prepared by the student's 
committee and will cover the area of the major field. If an oral examination is required, the chair of 
the student's committee will send written notices of the time and place of the examination. 
Comprehensive examinations, whether written or oral, will be administered no later than the last 
academic week of the semester in which the student expects to receive the degree and the 
comprehensive exam results form must be submitted by the department chair to the Graduate Studies 
Office no later than the last day of exam week. The examination may be administered earlier in 
the semester/term if the department so desires. A student who fails the comprehensive 
examination may not retake the examination until its next regular administration and may repeat the 
examination only once. 

XI. Application for Degree and Audit 

Students should submit to the graduate degree auditor a signed, completed application for degree 
by the specified deadline the semester before they wish to graduate. The graduate degree auditor 
will check the application and notify die student and his or her adviser of any problems. (See 
tiiesis-dissertation deadline schedule in the Bulletin.) See www. usm . edu/graduatestud ies for specific 
directions. Students who do not graduate the semester for which they applied must contact the 
graduate degree auditor. 

Specialist's Degree Requirements 

Specialist degrees provide more advanced knowledge, problem-solving skills, and training needed to 
contribute to a discipline with greater emphasis on skill development and integration of applied research. 

I. Credit Hours 

A minimum of thirty-three (33) semester hours credit beyond the master's degree is required for any 
specialist's degree. Some departments may require more hours. Students must also meet all degree 
requirements relating to the master's degree. A 3.0 GPA in the specialist program and no grade below a 
"C" are required for graduation. 

II. Plan Of Study Form 

Students must submit a "plan of study" form to the Graduate Studies Office by their first 
semester of enrollment. See www usm.edu/graduatestudies/planofstudy . 

III. Time Limitation 

The student must complete the specialist's degree within six calendar years from the date of initial 
enrollment in a graduate program. Six years is the maximum age allowed for graduate credits 
toward a specialist's degree. The Graduate Studies Office, under extenuating circumstances, and 
special petition, may approve revalidation of over-age credit hours if the original credit was earned 
at The University of Southern Mississippi and if the department chair approves the revalidation. The 
revalidation is secured by the student's successfully passing a special examination on the course. 
However, any student who fails to complete the specialist's degree program within the six-year time 
period becomes subject to any changes in degree requirements made at any date six years prior to 
graduation. The fee charged for the special revalidation examination is to be paid before the revali- 
dation examination is taken. Over-age extension courses cannot be revalidated. Revalidation forms are 
available in the Graduate Studies Office. 

IV. Credit Hours Limitations 

A. A total of no more than nine (9) semester hours of work earned as a non-degree student may be 
applied toward a specialist's degree. Please note C below. 

B. As many as six (6) semester hours of graduate credit from other accredited institutions may be 
transferred to the student's program with the approval of die appropriate department chair and the 
dean provided that the course work transferred falls within the six-year period allowed for the 
degree. This course work must carry a letter or numeric grade of "B" or better and not count toward 
a another graduate degree and cannot be a pass/fail course. ■ - . 

C. A total sum of no more dian nine (9) semester hours of transfer work and non-degree work may 
be applied toward a specialist's degree. 

V. Residency 

The purposes of academic residency are to provide specialist students witii significant time for 
extensive involvement with faculty, professional colleagues, and peers and to provide a period of 
time for concentrated study and course work. It is structured as a full-time experience. The minimum 
residency requirements for the specialist's degree can be fulfilled by the completion of one full-time 
semester of nine (9) semester hours of graduate study on campus. (This is not residency for tuition 
purposes). 



General Degree Requirements 29 



B. 



C. 



VI. The Specialist's Committee 

The student's work toward the specialist's degree is supervised either by a departmental committee 
composed of a chair and at least two members recommended by the department chair and appointed 
by the Graduate Studies Office or by an experienced faculty adviser. Committee appointment forms 
should be sent to the Graduate Studies Office. 

VII. The Minor Field 

If a minor field is required in the specialist's program, it shall consist of nine (9) semester hours of 
graduate course work and may consist of courses from a number of related areas. Some disciplines 
define their own minor and may require more than nine (9) semester hours to complete the minor. The 
minor department mustbe consulted to determine specific requirements. 

VIII. Continuous Enrollment 

Students are expected to enroll continuously after they have taken required course work until they 

complete their degree. They may enroll as stipulated below. 

A. Students must enroll for one (1) hour in the summer term if they are using university services, 
e.g., library and/or technology services, or consulting their thesis/project advisor. 
Students must register for three (3) hours of 798 or project hours during the semester/term they 
expect to defend and complete the thesis or project. All required course work must be completed 
before the semester in which the student defends the thesis. The thesis must be deposited in the 
Graduate Studies Office or the final project given to the major professor. 
Students must register for one (1 ) hour of 797 or project hour the next semester/term if they have 
not deposited the thesis in the dean's office or submitted the final project to their department. 
Failure to enroll for the appropriate hours will result in the student s being discontinued from 
Southern Miss and will require that the student reapply for admission to the program. 
D. Leave of Absence 

Under special circumstances such as illness, family hardship, or military service a student may 
request a leave of absence. Leaves of absence will be granted for one semester or longer as 
circumstances warrant. Requests for a leave of absence should be submitted in writing to the 
department chair or director. The chair or director will then forward his or her recommendation 
to the Graduate Studies Office for consideration. The graduate studies office will notify the 
student and chair or director of the decision. Normally, requests should be submitted at least one 
semester before die leave of absence. 

IX. The Specialist's Thesis or Project 

A. The specialist's degree entails the writing of a thesis (798. Thesis, 6 hrs. required) or completion 
of a field-based project. 

B. Thesis committee comprised of three graduate faculty members is recommended by the 
department chair and appointed by the director of Graduate Studies. The Committee 
Appointment form should be sent to the Graduate Studies Office. The diesis prospectus approval 
form should be sent to the graduate degree auditor when the student's prospectus is approved. 

C. As appropriate, the Institutional Review Board and/or die Institutional Animal Care and Use 
Committee must approve the thesis method before the thesis is begun. The signed approval 
forms and approval letter must be included in an appendix (See The Institutional Review Board 
section of Research Policies in Bulletin.) 

A separate bulletin outlining university requirements concerning the preparation of theses is 
available in the Graduate Studies Office or on the Web at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies. 
Oral Defense of Thesis. After the thesis has been accepted and after all required course work 
has been completed, a final oral examination on die thesis and related fields will be conducted 
by the student's thesis committee and any other faculty members designated by the dean. The 
examination will be open to any member of the graduate faculty. The committee chair should 
submit the results of the oral defense of thesis form to the Graduate Studies Office immediately 
following die defense. A copy of the thesis title page should also be submitted. 

F. Students are responsible for meeting the thesis deadlines that are listed on the thesis-dissertation 
deadline schedule in the Bulletin. If a student fails to meet the final deposit deadline, his/her 
degree will be awarded the next semester. The thesis must be deposited in the Graduate Studies 
Office. 

X. Comprehensive Exam 

In addition to regular examinations, final comprehensive examinations are required for specialist's 
degrees. The major department will determine whether the comprehensive examination will be 
written or oral or both. The written comprehensive, if required, will be prepared by the student's 
committee and will cover the area of the major field. If an oral examination is required, the chair 
of the student's committee will send written notices of the time and place of the examination. 
Comprehensive examinations, whether written or oral, will be administered no later than the last 
academic week of the semester/term in which the student expects to receive the degree and the results 
form submitted by the department chair to the Graduate Studies Office no later than the last day of 
exam week. The examination may be administered earlier in the semester/term if the department so 
desires. A student who fails the comprehensive examination may not retake the examination until its 
next regular administration and may repeat the examination only once. 



D 



E 






30 



General Degree Requirements 





XL Application for Degree and Audit. 

Students should submit to the graduate degree auditor a signed, completed application for degree by 
the specified deadline the semester before they wish to graduate. The graduate degree auditor will 
check the application and notify the student and his/her adviser of any problems. See www.usm. 
edu/graduatestudies for specific directions. Students who do not graduate the semester they applied 
for must contact the graduate degree auditor. 

Doctoral Degree Requirements 

Doctoral degrees are research degrees that provide (a) specialized, advanced knowledge of a discipline, (b) 
an ability to integrate a specialized field of study into the larger areas of knowledge, and (c) the critical, 
analytical, and/or problem-solving tools needed to produce original, independent scholarly research or 
creative work in a discipline, thus contributing to the discipline's body of knowledge. 

I. Credit Hours 

All doctoral degrees entail a minimum of eighty- four (84) semester hours of course work beyond the 
bachelor's degree or fifty- four (54) semester hours of course work beyond the master's degree. A 3.0 
GPA and no grade below a "C" are required for graduation. 

II. Plan Of Study Form 
Students must submit a "plan of study" form to the Graduate Studies Office by their second 
semester of enrollment. See www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/planofstudy . 

III. Time Limitations 
The student must complete the doctoral degree within eight (8) calendar years from the date of 
initial enrollment in a doctoral program. Six years is the maximum age allowed for course work 
and the comprehensive exam, other than dissertation and research hours toward a graduate degree. 
The Graduate Studies Office, under extenuating circumstances and special petition, may approve 
revalidation of over-age credit hours if the original credit was earned at The University of Southern 
Mississippi and if the department chair approves the revalidation. The revalidation is secured by the 
student's successfully passing a special examination on the course. However, any student who fails 
to complete the doctoral degree program within the eight-year tune period becomes subject to any 
changes in degree requirements made at any date eight years prior to graduation. The fee charged for 
the special revalidation examination is to be paid before the revalidation examination is taken. Over- 
age extension courses cannot be revalidated. Revalidation forms are available in the Graduate Studies 
Office. 

IV. Credit Hour Limitations 

A. Transfer of credit for graduate work done at other institutions must be approved by the 
§5jj|| department chair, dean, and University Director of Graduate Studies. Final evaluation of and 
§3§§ acceptance of transfer credit will not be made until the student has been in residence for one 

semester. Coursework accepted for transfer must carry with it a letter or numeric grade (B 
or better) and cannot have been graded pass/fail and may not have counted toward another 
graduate degree. Transfer of credit for doctoral degree programs is limited to not more than 
six (6) semester hours or nine (9) quarter hours beyond the master's degree. Exceptions to 
this restriction may be made only with the approval of the department chair and the university 
director of Graduate Studies. 

B. Credit earned as a non-degree graduate student cannot be applied toward a doctoral degree. 

V. Residency 
The purposes of academic residency are to provide doctoral students with significant time for extensive 
involvement with faculty, professional colleagues, and peers and to provide a period of time for concen- 
trated study and course work. It is structured as a full-time experience. The following are options for 
satisfying the residency requirement: (a) two consecutive terms of 1 2 hours each, (b) two consecutive 
summer terms of 12 hours each with continuous enrollment during intervening terms, or (c) three 
consecutive terms of 9 hours each. Students must consult with individual departments regarding 
which of these options are approved and whether online or off-campus courses can be used to establish 
residency. This is not residency for tuition purposes. 

VI. The Doctoral Committee 
The student's work toward the doctoral degree is supervised by a departmental committee composed 
of a chair and at least four members recommended by the department chair and appointed by the 
university director of Graduate Studies. Qualified individuals from outside the university may serve 
if they have specialized knowledge needed by the student and are approved by the Graduate Council. 
The Committee Appointment form should be sent to the Graduate Studies Office by the student's 
second semester. The form is located on the Web at www.usm.edu/gradautestudies. 

VII. The Minor Field 
If a minor field is required in the doctoral program, it shall consist of twelve (12) semester hours of 
graduate course work and may consist of courses from a number of related areas. Some disciplines 
define their own minor and may require more than twelve (12) semester hours to complete the minor. 
The minor department must be consulted to determine specific requirements. 



General Degree Requirements j 31 



VIII. Qualifying Exam 

At or near the beginning of the student's work beyond the master's level, the department or school 
may require a preliminary examination to determine the student's qualifications to pursue a doctoral 
degree and to assist the student's advisory committee in planning the degree program. The details 
of the qualifying examination, including the time, date, and place of administration, will be 
determined by the particular department and are discussed in the department's graduate handbook. 
The results of the qualifying examination form should be submitted to the Graduate Studies Office. 
IX. Research Tools 

Each doctoral degree program has a research tool requirement that is determined by the 
department. Consult the department for the specific requirements. Verification of the research tools 
requirement occurs on the plan of study form. 
X. Comprehensive Exam 

At the completion of specified required course work and other examinations, the doctoral student 
is required to take a written and/or oral comprehensive examination in his or her major and 
minor field. A student who does unsatisfactory work on the comprehensive examination may be 
granted a second examination at the next regularly scheduled time or later. The student's doctoral 
committee will recommend the conditions to be met before the examination may be repeated. The 
comprehensive examinations may be retaken only once. The comprehensive examination should 
be successfully completed either before the first formal prospectus meeting or before substantial 
research is completed for the dissertation and within six years from initial enrollment. The student's 
committee chair should submit the comprehensive exam results form to the Graduate Studies 
Office. 
XL Continuous Enrollment 

A. Students must register for three (3) hours of coursework during the semester in which they take 
their comprehensive examinations. 

B. After a doctoral student completes his or her comprehensive examination, continuous enrollment 
in at least one (1) semester hour must be maintained during each fall and spring semester until 
the student successfully defends the dissertation. 

C. A student may petition the Graduate Studies Office for an exemption from the continuous 
enrollment policy, provided that the student has the written endorsement of his or her advisory 
committee and the chair of the department. Students may petition the office only if they are 

in absentia from the University and not utilizing resources of the University. Exemptions 
will be granted if the student is absent from the University in order to conduct fieldwork, 
including work in archives and libraries, or who are absent to assume pre-doctoral fellowships; 
exemptions will not be granted to students who discontinue their enrollment to assume or to 
continue positions in business, industry, or education. Students who fail to enroll continuously 
must reapply for admission. Once readmitted they will be assessed a fee equal to two (2) 
semester hours of tuition for each semester they were not continuously enrolled. The rate 
of tuition shall be calculated in accordance with the schedule established for the semester or 
term in which the student reapplies for admission. The fee shall not be discounted, and all 
additional fees, including revalidation and application fees, will be assessed. 

D. Students must register for three (3) hours of 898 during the semester they defend the 
dissertation. All required coursework must be completed before the semester in which the 
dissertation is defended. 

E. If a student does not submit copies of his or her dissertation in a form acceptable to the Graduate 
Reader prior to the deadlines established in a given semester, or if the student's degree will 
not be awarded until the next term, then the student must register for one (1) hour of 898 
(dissertation) during the semester or term in which the degree will be awarded. 

F. Leave of Absence 

Under special circumstances such as illness, family hardship, or military service a student may 
request a leave of absence. Leaves of absence will be granted for one semester or longer as 
circumstances warrant. Requests for a leave of absence should be submitted in writing to the 
department chair or director. The chair or director will then forward his or her recommendation 
to the dean for consideration. The dean will notify the graduate admissions, the student and chair 
or director of the decision. Normally, requests should be submitted at least one semester before 
the leave of absence: 
XII. Application for Degree and Audit 

Students should submit to the graduate degree auditors a signed, completed application for degree 
by the specified deadline the semester before they wish to graduate. The graduate degree auditors 
will check the application and notify the student and his or her adviser of any problems. See www, 
usm . edu/graduatestudi es for specific directions. 



32 j] General Degree Requirements 




XIII. The Dissertation 

A. The dissertation topic must be approved by the student's major professor and advisory 
committee and must be an original and significant contribution to knowledge in die chosen 
field. The dissertation approval form must be submitted at least one semester before the student 
graduates. As appropriate, the Institutional Review Board and/or the Institutional Animal 
Care and Use Committee must approve the method before the study is begun. The signed 
approval forms and the approval letter must be included in an appendix of the dissertation. 
(See Institutional Review Board section of Research Policies in Bulletin and at www.usm. 
edu/graduatestudies. ) 

B. The guidelines for the preparation of dissertations are available on the Web at wwvv.usm.edu/ 
graduatestudies. 

C. The student must complete a total of twelve (12) hours of 898 - Dissertation and must register 
for three (3) dissertation hours the semester he/she defends the dissertation. 

D. The graduate reader ensures that dissertations meet the university requirements. Students should 
check the graduate studies web page for important deadlines and should make appointments 
with the graduate reader. They should allow ample time for revisions. 

E. Students are responsible for meeting the dissertation deadlines that are listed on the thesis- 
dissertation deadline schedule in the Bulletin and on the Web at www.usm.edu/graduate studies. 
If a student fails to meet die final deposit deadline, his or her degree will be awarded die next 
semester. The student must enroll for one (1) hour of 898 diat semester. The three copies of 
the dissertation must be deposited in the Graduate Studies Office. 

F. The Dissertation Oral Defense. After the dissertation has been accepted and at least seven 
weeks before the candidate is scheduled to receive the degree, a final oral examination of 
the dissertation and related fields will be conducted by the student's doctoral committee and 
any other faculty members designated by the Graduate Studies Office. The examination will 
be open to any member of the graduate faculty. The results of the oral defense form should 
be submitted to die Graduate Studies Office immediately following the defense. After the 
doctoral committee members have been adequately consulted about the results of the student's 
research as well as the form and condition of the dissertation, the committee chair will schedule 
the defense widi die Graduate Studies Office and other appropriate offices at least ten (10) 
working days in advance of the defense. The meeting will be open to any member of the 
faculty and, at the discretion of the chair, may be opened to the public. The committee chair, 
with advice from the committee, has complete authority for die conduct of the defense. The 
chair may recognize those wishing to ask questions about the candidate's research. Questions 
and resulting discussion should be appropriate. The committee chair may end the open part of 
the defense by restricting the meeting to the committee after an appropriate time. Discussion 
of the results of the defense must be limited to the committee members. A majority vote will 
determine the result of the defense and shall be reported to the Graduate Studies Office at the 
close of the meeting by the chair of the doctoral committee. 

XIV. Documents 

The doctoral student must have the documents listed below on file with the Graduate Studies 
Office. Students are advised to check their files in the graduate studies office for completeness of 
documentation. Students should check the "milestone" section of their advising transcript (GRDII) 
to verify these documents have been received by the Graduate Studies Office. See www.usm.edu/ 
graduatestudies for list of forms. 

A. Plan Of Study Form. Students must submit a "plan of study" form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by their second semester of enrollment. See www.usm.edu/graduatestudies for specific 
directions. 

B. Qualifying Exam Results Form. The department chair should submit the form to the graduate 
degree auditor indicating that the student has completed the qualifying exam if it is required. 

C. Doctoral Committee Appointment Form. The department chair should submit the form to 
the graduate studies office indicating who will serve on the student's committee. A letter of 
appointment will be sent to the committee members and adviser. 

D. Comprehensive Exam Results Form. The doctoral committee chair should submit the results 
of the comprehensive exam form to the graduate degree auditor. 

E. Application for Degree. The student should present two copies of die Application for Degree 
form, stamped by the Business Office to verify payment of fees during the semester preceding 
that of graduation. See www.usm.edu/graduatestudies for details. Students not graduating in the 
semester for which they applied must contact the graduate degree auditor. 

F. Dissertation Prospectus Approval and Application for Candidacy Form. After completing 
all the requirements for the doctoral degree other dian the dissertation and after die dissertation 
prospectus has been approved at least one semester prior to graduation, die student must file 
two copies of the form with the graduate degree auditor and one copy widi the adviser, before 
or at the time the application for degree is filed. Students are reminded to secure approval of 
the Human Subjects Review Committee or the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee if 
necessary. 



General Degree Requirements jj 33 



G. Dissertation Defense Results Form. The doctoral committee chair should submit the results 
of the oral defense of the dissertation form to the graduate reader immediately following the 
defense. A copy of the dissertation title page should also be submitted. Final copies of the 
dissertation must be deposited in the Graduate Studies Office. (See deadlines) 

Transfer Credit Policy 

Master's Degree. As many as six (6) semester hours of graduate credit from other accredited 
institutions may be transferred to a student's program based on review and approval of the appropriate 
department chair, dean, and the University director of Graduate Studies provided that the course work 
transferred falls within the six year period allowed for the degree. Such course work must carry a 
letter or numeric grade of "B" or better and cannot be a pass/fail course. The course work may not 
have counted toward another graduate degree. 

Specialist Degree. As many as six (6) semester hours of graduate credit from other accredited 
institutions may be transferred to a student's program based on review and approval of the 
appropriate department chair, dean, and the University director of Graduate Studies provided that the 
course work transferred falls within the six year period allowed for the degree. Such course work 
must carry a letter or numeric grade and cannot be a pass/fail course. The course work may not have 
counted toward another graduate degree. 

Doctoral Degree. As many as six (6) semester hours or nine (9) quarter hours of graduate credit from 
other accredited institutions may be transferred to a student's program based on review and approval 
of the appropriate department chair, dean, and the University Director of Graduate Studies provided 
that the course work transferred falls within the six year period allowed for the degree. Such course 
work must carry a letter or numeric grade and cannot be a pass/fail course. The course work may not 
have counted toward another graduate degree. Final evaluation of and acceptance of transfer credit 
will not be made until the student has been in academic residence for one semester. 

Exceptions to these transfer credit policies made be made only with the approval of the department 
chair, dean, and the University Director of Graduate Studies. Transfer credit approval forms are 
available in departments and the Graduate Studies Office. The approval form and an original 
transcript from the university at which the courses were taken should be submitted at least one 
semester before the student plans to graduate. 

Dissertation and Thesis Deadline Schedule 

The Graduate Studies Office maintains a schedule of deadlines for students writing theses and disser- 
tations. The schedule is available at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies and in the Graduate Studies office. 
Generally, students should be aware that applications for degree must be submitted one semester in 
advance of the semester or term in which they plan to graduate. 




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34 I] General Academic Information 



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General Academic Information 



Registration 



A graduate student is responsible for knowing the policies and regulations and the departmental 
requirements relevant to his or her individual degree program. Only the general academic regulations 
and requirements governing all graduate programs are given below. Specific requirements pertaining 
to individual degree programs are outlined within the department sections. 

Students should pre-register each semester at the designated time using SOAR on the web. Specific 
directions are published in the Class Schedule Guide. By registering for classes, students are 
contracting to pay their tuition and fees. Students who pre-register must pay minimum payment (if 
applicable) by the due date or there will be an additional pre-registration fee of $100 added to their 
accounts. Classes will be dropped at a later date for nonpayment. 

Registration will continue after die close of the scheduled registration period (see calendar) for five class days. 

A late registration fee will be charged to all students registering after the scheduled registration 
period. The fee is $50. 

Add/Drop/Withdrawal 

A student is permitted to drop a course without academic penalty up to the date published in the Class 
Schedule Guide. After the deadline, a student may drop a course only in the event of extenuating 
circumstances and with permission of the instructor, department chair, and dean of the college offering 
the course, at which time the student will receive a grade of "WP" or "WF." Non degree students should 
go to the Graduate Studies Office after the chair signs form. 

A student is permitted to add a course after the fifth class day with the permission of the instructor, 
department chair, and dean of the college offering the course. However, a student will not be allowed 
to add a course after the last day to drop without academic penalty as published in the Class Schedule 
Guide. Adding classes after the 100 percent refund period could result in additional tuition charges. 
A student withdrawing from the university prior to the deadline for dropping classes will not receive 
any grades. His or her record will show the date of withdrawal only. A student withdrawing after the 
deadline for dropping courses will receive a grade of "WP" or "WF." 

Withdrawal Procedures 

A student finding it necessary to withdraw from the university must begin the process with the 
dean of his or her college who shall complete the withdrawal and refund authorization form. A 
non-degree student must begin the process in the Graduate Studies Office. The Web may not be 
utilized to withdraw. 

Refund Policy 



The withdrawal deadline for receipt of a grade has nothing to do with the refund schedule for fees. A student 
who officially withdraws after enrollment may obtain a refund in accordance with the refund policy. Upon 

«1 



§2| notification to the registrar and business services offices, a review will be made on a case-by-case basis for 
withdrawals that did not follow official withdrawal policy. 

Appeals for refunds due to extenuating circumstances may be made in writing to 
^^M The University of Southern Mississippi 

Business Services 
118 College Drive #5133 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

Course Work 



Courses open to graduate students for graduate credit are those numbered 500 or above. All graduate course 
work, including 500-level courses, shall have a research component that is included in the final grade. 

Many courses have certain prerequisites. A student who wishes to register for a particular course must 
satisfy the department concerned that he or she has had preparation adequate for admission to the 



General Academic Information I 35 



The general regulation that degree work must be completed within a six-year period applies to all 
course work. A grade-point average of "B" or better must be maintained to be in good standing. 
Students whose grade point average falls below a 3.0 will be placed on probation (see Probation 
section of the Bulletin). The use of the pass/fail option at the graduate level for any course must be 
approved by the Graduate Council. On the recommendation of the student's committee or major 
professor, a student may retake one graduate level course in order to improve his/her grade point 
average. 



Academic Honesty 



When cheating is discovered, the faculty member may give the student an "F" on the work involved 
or in the course. If further disciplinary action is deemed appropriate, the student should be reported 
to the dean of students. 

In addition to being a violation of academic honesty, cheating violates the Code of Student Conduct, 
as published in the Student Handbook and may be grounds for probation, suspension, and/or 
expulsion. 

Students on disciplinary suspension may not enroll in any courses offered by The University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

Plagiarism* 

Plagiarism is scholarly theft, and it is defined as the unacknowledged use of others' work. More specif- 
ically, any written or oral presentation in which the writer or speaker does not distinguish clearly between 
original and borrowed material constitutes plagiarism. 

Because students, as scholars, must make frequent use of the concepts and facts developed by other 
scholars, plagiarism is not the mere use of another's facts and ideas. However, it is plagiarism when 
students present the work of other scholars as if it were their own work. 
Plagiarism is committed in a number of ways: 

1. Reproducing another author's writing as if it were one's own. 

2. Paraphrasing another author's work without citing the original. 

3. Borrowing from another author's ideas, even though those ideas are reworded, without 
giving credit. 

4. Copying another author's organization without giving credit. 

Plagiarism is a serious offense. An act of plagiarism may lead to a failing grade on the paper and in the 
course, as well as sanctions that may be imposed by the student judicial system. 
*Takenfrom Student Handbook 

Final Examinations 

Examinations will be held as published in the Class Schedule Guide. No final examinations are permitted 
prior to the scheduled examination period (see calendar). A student who is absent from the final 
examination without valid reason approved by the Office of the Provost forfeits credit for the semester. 



Course Loads 



I. Although the maximum load of a full-time graduate student for the fall and spring semesters is 
sixteen (16) semester hours with permission of the Graduate Studies Office, the normal load for a 
full-time graduate student is generally considered to be twelve (12) semester hours. 

II. The minimum load for a full-time graduate student is nine (9) semester hours for students living in 
Pine Haven, using the services of the clinic, using the services of veteran's affairs, or using other 
similar services of the university (spring and/or fall). 

III. The minimum load for graduate assistant is twelve (12) hours. The student should receive a tuition 
waiver in the fall or spring semester. The maximum load for a graduate assistant is thirteen (13) 
hours. 

VI. The courses numbered 697 and 797 — Independent Study and Research — may be taken for any 
amount of credit (up to a maximum of sixteen (16) hours in any one semester). Students who are not 
in residence but who are actively working on a thesis, project, research problem, or dissertation, and 
consulting with the major professor or making use of the library or other University facilities must 
enroll for at least one (1) hour each semester (see Continuous Enrollment sections). 



36 | General Academic Information 



IV. In no case may the total hours involved in a student's program, including both the course work and 
the assistantship assignment, exceed eighteen (18) hours. 

V. The maximum load for any graduate student in the summer session is twelve (12) hours. In the 
summer term, the minimum load for a student who receives a tuition waiver is nine (9) hours. 

VBL Students enrolling only for 698, 798, or 898 or courses entitled "Internship," should enroll for a 

minimum of three hours, or PSY 796 for a minimum of four hours. 
VIIL Students enrolling only for 691, 791, or 891 (or other courses titled "Research in...") should enroll 

for a minimum of three hours. 



Grading System 



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111! 



vm 



A — indicates excellent work and carries 4.0 quality points per semester hour. 

A indicates excellent work and carries 3.7 quality points per semester hour. 

B+ — indicates good work and carries 3.3 quality points per semester hour. 

B — indicates good work and carries 3.0 quality points per semester hour. 

B indicates good work and carries 2.7 quality points per semester hour. 

C+ — indicates average work and carries 2.3 quality points per semester hour. 

C — indicates average work and carries 2.0 quality points per semester hour. 

C indicates average work and carries 1.7 quality points per semester hour. 

D+ — indicates inferior work and carries 1.3 quality points per semester hour. 

D — indicates inferior work and carries 1.0 quality point per semester hour. 

E — indicates a course in progress. Not included in the grade point average, a grade of E shall 
be awarded for graduate thesis, recital, project, and dissertation courses and for such self- 
paced or skill courses as the Graduate Council may designate. An E shall be changed to a P 
only in the case of credit for thesis and dissertation and then only for the last recorded credit 
for these courses. Otherwise, the E remains on the record indicating that to receive credit 
the student must re-register for the course, repeating it on a regular basis until completing 
it. Upon completion, the appropriate grade, whether P or valuative, shall be assigned. 

F — indicates failure and carries no quality points. 

NA — indicates the instructor reported the student as not attending. The grade is 

considered as attempted, but no quality points are earned. The grade is calculated as 
an "F" in the student's grade point average. 

I — indicates that a student was unable to complete course requirements by the end of the term 
because of extraordinary circumstances beyond his or her control. Poor performance or 
unexplained absences are not justification for the assignment of an I. If an I has not been 
removed by the end of the next semester (excluding summer term), it automatically becomes 
an F. Students are prohibited from enrolling in any course for which the current grade is I. The 
I grade is not used for thesis or dissertation hours. 

AW — indicates administrative withdrawal. 

W.P — indicates withdrawal from a course passing after the deadline for dropping courses. 

WF — indicates withdrawal from a course failing after the deadline for dropping courses. (This grade 
is computed in the GPA as F.) 

P — indicates a passing grade in courses taken on a pass-fail basis (does not count in computing 
GPA). 

Probation 

A student whose cumulative graduate grade point average (GPA) or whose program grade point average 
falls below 3.0 will be placed on probation. That student must attain a cumulative 3.0 GPA by the end 
of the following (probationary) semester including summer, if the student is enrolled summer term. 
A student who fails to achieve a 3.0 at the end of the probationary semester can be reclassified as a 
discontinued student. Departments may set more stringent probationary conditions. A new application is 
required for consideration to reenter the program. 

Students may request an appeal of reclassification by writing to the chair of department and the 
University Director of Graduate Studies requesting an appeals hearing. Contact Graduate Studies 
Office for specific procedures. 



General Academic Information 37 



Grade Review Policy 

The instructor (defined as one who has the responsibility for a class, special problem, research, thesis, 
or dissertation) has the authority in his or her class over all matters affecting the conduct of the class, 
including the assignment of grades. Student performance should be evaluated according to academic 
criteria made available to all students within the first two weeks of each semester. Grades should not 
be determined in an arbitrary or capricious manner. 

When a student disagrees with the final grade given by an instructor, fair play requires the opportunity 
for an orderly appellate procedure. A student must initiate the appeal procedure within 30 school 
days (excluding Saturday, Sunday, and official student holidays) of the beginning of the semester 
subsequent to the one in which the grade was awarded, or 120 calendar days after the issuance of 
Spring semester grades, should the student not be enrolled during the summer term. The procedure 
assures due process for both the instructor and student. For policies and procedures governing grade 
review, contact the Office of the Provost. 

Grievance Procedures 

A student who wishes to file a grievance should follow the steps outlined in the Student Handbook. 
Academic grievances should be addressed to the department chair to be resolved. If not resolved, the 
grievance should be addressed to the dean, then to the University Director of Graduate Studies. 

Administrative Withdrawal 

A university transcript is a legal document that provides a true and accurate account of academic 
performance. Any alteration of the history of academic performance as reported by a university 
transcript should be done only if there is an obvious rationale for doing so. 

On rare occasions, academic performance is severely affected by some emotional or personal disaster 
beyond the control of the student. If a timely withdrawal was impossible or overlooked, a procedure 
known as administrative withdrawal may offer a remedy. 

A student who wishes to petition for an administrative withdrawal should be aware of the following 
criteria in considering the request: 

A. The student's academic record under review indicates a clear and consistent pattern of good 
academic performance prior to and subsequent to the semester in question if he or she is 
currently enrolled. 

B. The problem encountered by the student was debilitating and beyond his or her control. 

C. The student is able to document the nature and extent of the problem 
The following guidelines pertain to a petition for administrative withdrawal: 

A. A petition for administrative withdrawal will be considered only if it is filed prior to 
graduation. 

B. Relief by administrative withdrawal will be limited to one semester. 

C. The grade of administrative withdrawal ("AW") will be assigned to all courses taken during 
the semester in question. 

D. Administrative withdrawal must be approved by the dean of the college in which the student was 
enrolled during the semester in question and by the provost. A student may request administrative 
withdrawal only once during his or her academic career, and that request must be limited to one 
particular semester. 

A petition for administrative withdrawal must contain the following: 

A. A concise but thorough statement of the circumstances responsible for the poor academic 
performance; 

B. Evidence (e.g., a medical diagnosis) supporting claims made in the statement; and 

C. A complete set of official transcripts exhibiting all college-level course work. 

Petitions for administrative withdrawal will be acted on within five working days after receipt by 
the dean of the college. 

Transcripts 

An official transcript is the reproduction of a complete, unabridged permanent academic record 
validated with the university seal, facsimile signature of the registrar, and date of issue. A Key to 
Transcript is included, which contains a full statement of pertinent definitions. Currently enrolled as 
well as former undergraduate and graduate students may obtain an official transcript by writing The 
University of Southern Mississippi, Office of the University Registrar, 118 College Drive #5006, 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39406-000 i. Transcripts are not released when tiiere is an indebtedness to 
the university. 



38 



General Academic Information 



Research Policies 

Institutional Review Board 

The University of Southern Mississippi and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services have 
established standards and guidelines to protect individuals from risks associated with participating 
in research studies. The university's Institutional Review Board (IRB) is responsible for ensuring 
that adequate safeguards are in place to minimize the risk to individuals involved in such studies. 
The IRB, through an appointed chairperson, reports directly to the vice president for research and 
economic development. The IRB acts as a monitor to ensure that the university's research using 
people as participants is in compliance with the U.S. DHHS policies and other procedures. 

All investigations, experiments, surveys, or demonstrations involving human subjects, regardless 
of funding or the source of the funds, must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review 
Board before the activity is begun. This includes activities in which a faculty member is supervising 
research activities, including class projects, master's theses, specialist's theses and projects, and 
doctoral dissertations. 

Application forms for submission of protocols for review by the Institutional Review Board are available 
from each college's representative and in the Office of Graduate Studies. Prior to submitting the 
required copies of an application for approval by the IRB, students should do the following: (1) have the 
application approved by their thesis, project, or dissertation director or professor teaching a course, (2) 
secure the appropriate signatures, and (3) have the application reviewed by their college representative 
to the Institutional Review Board (IRB). The current IRB chair is Dr. Lawrence Hosman, Department of 
Speech Communication, (601-266-4271). 

The signed and approved IRB application forms and approval letter should be included in an 
appendix of the thesis, project, and/or dissertation. The names of the college representatives to the 
IRB may be obtained from the college dean's office and the Graduate Studies Office (See www.usm. 
edu/graduatestudies/instreviewboard.php. 

Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee 

The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is a standing committee of the 
university. The IACUC is qualified through the experience and expertise of its members to oversee 
the university's animal program, facilities, and procedures. The IACUC consists of eight members 
(six regular and two ex officio) and its membership meets the compositional requirements set forth 
in the Public Health Service Policy. The IACUC, through an appointed chairperson, reports directly 
to the vice president for research and economic development. The IACUC acts as a monitor to ensure 
the university's facilities are operated in compliance with the Public Health Service Policy and other 
federal policies. 

Federal law requires that any university activity (whether research or instructional in nature) 
involving the use of vertebrate animals be reviewed by the IACUC and approved by that body before 
the activity may proceed. The original completed form, signed by the project director (a faculty 
member, not a student), the appropriate departmental chair and dean, and nine (9) copies should 
be forwarded to the chair of the IACUC for processing. Review of applications requires approxi- 
mately two to six weeks. The approved IACUC protocol application form should be included in an 
appendix of the thesis, project, and/or dissertation. IACUC protocol forms and instructions may be 
obtained from the IACUC website at www.usm.edu/iacuc or by emailing iacuc(g).usm.edu. Dr. Robert 
Bateman, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. 118 College Drive # 5025, Hattiesburg, MS 
39406-0001, (601) 266-6820) is the current chair. 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid | 39 



Student Expenses and 
Financial Aid 

The University of Southern Mississippi is supported chiefly by legislative appropriations. Increases 
in student fees are put into effect only when public support funds are inadequate and no other 
recourse is available. Increases are made only for support of the institution or improvement of the 
activity program of the students; therefore, the university must reserve the right to increase or modify 
fees and expenses without prior notice but with approval of the Board of Trustees of State Institutions 
of Higher Learning. 

Fees and expenses are in the form of general tuition, room and board, and special fees. 

General Tuition 

This fee, together with the allocation from the legislative appropriation, is used for general support of 
the university. Athletic activities and University Activity Council (UAC) programs are not included 
for part-time students. 

Full-time students for purposes of assessing fees are those who take nine (9) or more semester hours during 
fall and spring semesters and seven (7) semester hours during summer term. Graduate students enrolled 
for more than thirteen (13) semester hours during fall and spring semesters and for more than twelve (12) 
semester hours during the summer term will be assessed the applicable fee for each additional semester 
hour. 

Clinical and hospital services covered by the health service charge included in the general tuition fee are 
limited to cases of ordinary illness. Services are provided within the limits of the professional, technical, 
and physical resources of the clinic. The university does not assume responsibility in cases of extended 
illness or for treatment of chronic diseases. Cases requiring surgery must be handled by a physician and 
hospital of the student's choice and at the student's expense. 

Board 

Board fees are assessed to all students living in the residence halls and fraternity houses. Board is 
available to all other students on an optional basis. Resident students may choose from a variety 
of Resident Dining Memberships but will automatically be assigned to the Golden Eagle Pass 
Membership. Students have until first two weeks of the semester to change their Dining Membership 
to a plan that better suits their lifestyle. Each membership comes with a designated number of 
meals per week that can be redeemed at The Fresh Food Company, Hillcrest, or Elam Arms. Each 
membership also comes with a designated amount of "Bonus Bucks" which can be used to purchase 
items at any campus dining location or convenience store. A complete listing of resident and 
commuter student dining memberships and dining locations can be found at eagledining.com. 



Telephone Service 



Telephone service in residence halls and family student housing is provided through /Tech. The cost 
of local telephone service, voicemail and call waiting are included as a part of housing fees. 

Caller ID can be purchased from /Tech on a per semester basis. For more information, contact /Tech 
Communication Information Services at 601-266-4002. 



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40 || Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



Post Office Box 

The post office box rental fee is assessed to all students living in university-controlled housing. 
Fees are assessed on an academic year basis and are calculated on time remaining in the academic 
year. The fee covers box rental for the remainder of the academic year provided the student remains 
enrolled. Those students living off campus may rent a post office box if they so desire. 

Student ID Cards 

The ID card is a PERMANENT card for each student. The same card must be kept and used even 
when returning from a previous year or semester. Do not destroy, lose, bend or tamper with an ID 
card. Only one card will be issued at no charge during a five (5)-year period. A fee of $15 will be 
charged at the time a replacement card is made. 

Department of Residence Life 

The Department of Residence Life feels very strongly that the educational benefits for residence 
hall students extend far beyond the classroom experience. Every effort is made to offer on-campus 
students the opportunity to take part in cultural, scholastic, athletic, and social programs developed 
by the residence hall staff. In addition, residence hall students experience cross-cultural living 
experiences which help promote open-mindedness, tolerance, and leadership-a philosophical goal 
of Residence Life. 

All residence halls are fully air conditioned with the capacity of offering diversified housing options 
to an on-campus population of 3,488 students. Each room in McCarty Men and McCarty Women 
has its own bathroom. Hillcrest and Mississippi for women, and Elam, Hattiesburg, and Vann for 
men are arranged in suite fashion with 4-6 students sharing a bath. Bolton, Jones, Pulley, Roberts, 
Scott, and Wilber (Panhellenic) for women, and Bond and Hickman for men are arranged with baths 
conveniently located on each floor. 

Application for campus housing should be made at the time of application to the university. The priority 
deadline for residence hall space is February 1. Applications, prepayment and signed housing contract 
received after February 1 will be processed based on space availability. Assignment of a student to a 
residence hall is contingent upon receiving prepayment and a signed housing contract at the time of 
application to housing. Although preferences are honored when possible, the application is for accommo- 
dation in a residence hall and not for a specific roommate or specific hall. Upperclass assignments are 
made based on date of application. Freshmen are assigned randomly into freshman residence halls. 

Students signing a housing contract are obligated to both fall and spring semesters. 
Cancellation of the housing contract can be made in cases of marriage, graduation, withdrawal, 
co-oping, student teaching, or interning. Notification of cancellation must be made in writing by the 
designated deadlines. Cancellations received after the deadlines will result in forfeiture of the entire 
prepayment amount for students not enrolling in the University. Students who have not cancelled by 
their designated deadline and are planning to enroll at the university with paid prepayment and signed 
contracts will be held to the terms and conditions of the academic year housing contract. 

Applications for campus housing should be mailed to 
The University of Southern Mississippi 
Department of Residence Life 
118 College Drive #5064 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

The Department of Residence Life accepts applications for housing assignments regardless of age, 
race, creed, color, or national origin. In compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and University 
policy, housing assignments will not be made on a segregated basis. 

1 Family Housing 

St 

a Pine Haven Apartments, consisting of 168 one-, two-, and three-bedroom unfurnished units, are 

m available for married students, single graduate students, and single students with custody of children. 

H Apartment assignments is based on the date of application. 

Jl ^ e rent ls ^ ue an( * P a y aD ' e at registration. Students obligate themselves to the full fee for each 
fH semester's rent when they move in, unless they withdraw from the university. A deposit of $75 is 
required at the time of application. Refund of rent due to withdrawal from the university is followed 
according to the university refund schedule. Cancellation of the lease contract must be made forty- 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid | 41 



five (45) days prior to the semester of cancellation. Notification of cancellation after the deadline 
obligates students to payment of rent for the following semester if enrolled, or forfeiture of deposit 
if not enrolled. Applications and brochures may be secured at the Pine Haven Office or by writing 
the Department of Residence Life. 



Dining Services 



Eagle Dining is committed to providing excellent food in a clean and appealing environment. All 

students living in a residence hall or a fraternity house are required to purchase a Resident Dining 

Membership. There are five memberships to choose from: 

Go Gold upgrade + $225 Bonus Bucks $1 ,099* 

Golden Eagle Pass + $75 Bonus Bucks $975* 

Rollover 10 Meal Membership + $150 Bonus Bucks $975** 
Rollover 7 Meal Membership + $200 Bonus Bucks $975** 

*unlimited meals per week, up to one per hour **meals per week 

(Note: all resident students will be assigned the Golden Eagle Pass upon registration. Your 
membership may be changed the first two weeks of classes by visiting the Eagle Dining Office or 
the dining Website at www.eagledining.com.) 

Each Resident Dining Membership includes a certain number of meals per week (Monday-Sunday) 
that may be redeemed at the Fresh Food Company in the Thad Cochran Center, Elam Arms Diner, 
and RFoC at Hillcrest. The Golden Eagle Pass provides for an unlimited number of meals per week 
at these locations during regular restaurant hours. Resident Dining Memberships are non-transferable 
and may not be taken within one hour of the last meal redeemed. 

A designated amount of Bonus Bucks is included with each Resident Dining Membership. Bonus 
Bucks are good for the current semester and may be used at any Eagle Dining location. For a 
complete and up to date listing of these locations, please visit our web site at eagledining.com. Chick- 
fil-A, Quiznos, and Starbucks are just a few of the retail locations where Bonus Bucks and Dining 
Dollars may be used to purchase food or convenience items. 

Dining Dollars are like Bonus Bucks, but a carry over on your account from semester to semester if 
not used. Dining Dollars are great to add on to your account when Bonus Bucks are running low. 

Commuter students are welcomed to purchase a Resident Dining Membership or may choose from 
one of our Commuter Dining Memberships listed below: 

Fresh Food 100 (100 meals)* $550 

save $100 off lunch door price 

Fresh Food 50 (50 meals)* $300 

save $25 off lunch door price 

Any Eagle Membership - Deposit as many or as few Dining Dollars as you like 



*meal never expire 

Dining memberships may be purchased with any major credit card on-line or at the Eagle Dining 
office located in the Thad Cochran Center. 

Dining Memberships Exemptions 

Dining membership exemptions are allowed only for those students with modified diets that cannot be 
prepared by the University Dining Services and for those students with internships which conflict with 
cafeteria serving hours. Those students who may qualify for an exemption should make arrangements 
for an evaluation PRIOR TO REGISTRATION. However, those not arranging for an evaluation prior 
to registration should go to the Eagle Dining Office in the Thad Cochran Center after registering for 
classes. Those students who have not completed the requirements for a dining membership exemption 
prior to registration will be charged for a membership during the registration process. Because the 
extensive serving hours in the Fresh Food Company, work-related exemptions will not be permitted. 

Medical Exemptions 

Those students with a medical problem requiring a modified diet who feel their needs cannot be met by 
the Eagle Dining should make arrangements to have their diet evaluated by the registered dietitian before 
registration. Documentation required for this evaluation includes a prescription signed by a physician 
which specifies the student's modified diet and a copy of the modified diet. 



ll 



42 | Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



Academic Related Exemptions 

Requirements: 

A student must miss a minimum of 50 percent of meals served per week. The meals missed must be 
due to an internship. 

Documentation Required: 

1 . A statement, on letterhead stationery, signed by the student's adviser, giving the student's hours, 
on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. 

2. A copy of the student's advisement and registration appointment form which shows the 
student's class schedule. 

Work-Related Exemptions 

University policy does not allow for dining membership exemptions for students holding part- 
time or full-time employment. 

Other Financial Information 

Payment of Fees 

One-half of a student's total fees are due and payable at time of registration. Students with university 
loans, grants, or scholarships may use those funds as payment for the first half of total fees. Loans, grants, 
scholarships and checks made payable to the university must be applied to fees in full before a refund or 
change can be given. These loans, grants, and scholarships may not be used to pay prior semester outstanding 
balances. Fees deferred past the last day to register each term will be billed monthly. A monthly service 
charge of 1.5 percent will be applied to die unpaid balance. Students who pre-register must pay minimum 
payment (if applicable) by the due date or there will be an additional pre-registration fee of $100 added to 
their accounts. Classes will be dropped at a later date for nonpayment. 

The university accepts payment by check, money order, cash, and all major credit cards. The university reserves the 
right to refuse payment by check where an individual has previously given a check that has been returned. 

The university reserves the right to withhold readmission of a student until all delinquent accounts have been paid In 
fact, all past due accounts will be included on registration fee invoices and monthly bills. Transcripts of credits will not 
be issued for students whose accounts are delinquent All fees must be paid before a degree will be awarded. Payments 
by personal check on delinquent accounts will be sent for collection before transcripts or degrees will be released To 
avoid any delay in receiving these documents, payments can be made by cash, cashier's clieck, or money order. 

Fines accumulated as a result of failure to adhere to the established procedures of the university, such as library and 
public safety regulations, or any other policy establishing regulations for the protection of university property, shall 
become collectable by the Business Office, and, if not collected shall constitute a delinquent account 

Late Registration 

A fee of $50 will be assessed students who register during the late registration period. 

Students whose checks for registration fees are returned will be assessed the late registration fee of $50 
in addition to the $30 returned check handling fee. Returned checks not promptly paid may result in 
dismissal from the university. 

Courses requiring special fees and music fees are shown in the Special Fee listing and are indicated 
by a plus sign in the Course Description Section of die Bulletin. 

Financial Assistance for Graduate Students 



mm 



'■^■ii 



;%i 



At present, the university has available about 500 university assistantships in all areas as well as 
fellowships provided by federal and private agencies. Amounts of assistantships vary from department 
to department. Contact the specific department for information regarding stipend levels available. 
Assistantships entail one half time of teaching or research assignment. To maintain an assistantship a 
student must have an average of "B" or better each semester. General tuition and the non-resident fee 
are waived for graduate assistantship holders. To qualify for this waiver, students on assistantships must 
be registered for courses totaling twelve (12) hours each semester (nine hours during Summer term). 
Courses taken as audit do not count toward these hours. The university also currently waives out-of- 
state fee for students on sabbatical leave with pay from schools and colleges. Contact the University 
Director of Graduate Studies for information. 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid | 43 



Inquiries regarding assistantships should be directed to the chair of the department to which the 
student is applying. Applications for assistantships must be filed by the department's deadline. Check 
with the department chair for the deadline. 

The Perkins Loan Program (formerly NDSL) and the Federal Work-Study Program are also available 
to graduate students. Applicants for Perkins Loans and Federal Work-Study Program should apply by 
March 15 (priority date) for loans and work to begin the fall term. Applications for the Perkins Loan 
Program, and the Federal Work-Study Program may be secured by writing the Office of Financial 
Aid. 

Students receiving financial aid must complete a minimum number of credits each semester or term. 
Graduate students must attempt at least four (4) graduate hours each semester in order to receive 
financial aid. Graduate students enrolled during a summer term must attempt at least three (3) graduate 
hours. Passing grades include A, A-, B+ B, B-, C+, C, C-, EH-, D, E, and P. Grades of I, F, Audit, 
and W will not be accepted as passing grades. Students failing to meet this quantitative measure of 
academic progress after the summer and fall semester will receive a warning letter. Students failing 
to complete the minimum number of hours after the spring semester will be placed on financial aid 
suspension and will be ineligible for federal financial assistance. 

Graduate students will be deemed in good standing and eligible to receive federal financial assistance 
until they have attempted twice the number of hours normally required to complete their program 
of study leading to a master's or doctoral degree. Attempted hours will include all courses on the 
academic transcript including grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, E, F, P, W, and I. 

Graduate students pursuing an additional master's degree will be limited to a maximum of 120 graduate 
hours. This total includes all graduate hours accumulated. Once a student earns a specialist's degree, he 
or she will be eligible for additional financial assistance only at the doctoral level; once a student earns 
a doctoral degree, he or she will be ineligible for additional federal financial assistance. 

Schedule of Fees 

(All fees are subject to change without notice.) 
FIXED FEES 

FALL, SPRING SUMMER 

SEMESTERS SESSION 
FULL-TIME STUDENTS (Per Semester) 

General Tuition $2,297 $2,297 

Housing Rent: 

Hillcrest, Elam Anns, Mississippi, Hattiesburg, and Vann $ 1 ,424 $900 

Roberts, Scott, Jones, Pulley, Bolton, Wilber, 

Hickman and Bond $1,328 $840 

Oseola McCarty Men's New Halt $1,699 $1,075 

Oseola McCarty Women's New Hall $1,699 $1,075 

Pine Haven Apartments 

1-bedroom $1,505 $1,505 

2-bedroom $1,623 $1,623 

3-bedroom $1,742 $1,742* 

*These prices are for double occupancy. 

Board: 

Go Gold upgrade + $225 Bonus Bucks $1,099* 

Golden Eagle Pass + $75 Bonus Bucks $975* 

Rollover 10* Meal Membership + $ 1 50 Bonus Bucks $975** 

Rollover7* Meal Membership + $200 Bonus Bucks $975** 



* unlimited meals per week, up to one per hour * * meals per week 



fi 



44 jj Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



Other Fees When Applicable 

Non-Resident Fee (This fee is in addition to the 

tuition fee above.) $3,014 

Post office box rental fees are non-refundable and 
are assessed as follows: 

Rented beginning fall semester $50 

Rented beginning spring semester $30 

Rented beginning summer semester $10 

Optional at same rates to students living off campus. 
PART-TIME STUDENTS— Each semester hour 

General Tuition — graduate student $255 $255 

Non-resident fee (In addition to general tuition): 

Graduate student $335 $335 

General tuition, room, board, and post office, if applicable, are payable each semester/session. 

Special Fees and Expenses 

Some colleges and departments have additional fees for selected graduate courses and for special 
services offered to students. Those fees are listed on the Southern Miss Web page 
www. usm.edu/graduatestudies. Master's, specialist's, doctoral, revalidation, and graduation deferral 
fees are also listed on the Graduate Studies Web page, www.usm.edu/graduatestudies. Students may 
call 601-266-4369 if they have any questions. 




HI 

■<%;.■ Atifi & 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid J 45 



Refund Policy 



Students who find it necessary to withdraw from the university must submit written requests to the 
deans, who will initiate the Withdrawal and Refund Form. 

Refunds are based on die following (applies to withdrawals and dropped classes): 

Withdrawal prior to the first day of classes of any term 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

The first tlirough the 10th working day 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

After the 10th working day None 

8W1 and 8W2 Fall and Spring Semesters 

The first through the fifth working day 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

After the fifth working day None 

Summer Term 

The first through the 10th working day 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

After the 10th working day None 

8W1 and 8W2 Summer Term 

The first through die fifth working day 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

After the fifth working day None 

Mini-Session Classes 
One-Week Mini-Session Classes 

The first working day 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

After die first working day None 

Two-Week Mini-Session Classes 

The first and second working day 100 percent less a $30 withdrawal fee 

After the second working day None 

These schedule dates are posted in the Business Office. 

Refunds are based on the assessment, not upon the amount paid by the student. 

Appeals for refunds due to extenuating circumstances may be made in writing to The University of 
Southern Mississippi, Business Services, 118 College Drive #5133, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001. 
Appeals must be received prior to the end of the academic year. 

Refunds/returns of Title IV funds for students who participate in SFA (Student Financial Assistance) 
programs are calculated based on federal regulations. The processing steps for determining refunds/ 
returns are available in Business Services, Forrest County Hall, Room 101. 



fey 



46 I Student Expenses and Financial Aid 



Residency Regulations 



Petitions for Change of Residency: Petitions for change of residency must be made on or before the last 
day of late registration. Forms are available in the Office of the University Registrar. 

Legal Residence of Students: The definitions and conditions stated here are as required by state 
law in the classification of students as residents or nonresidents for the assessment of fees. Requests 
for a review of residency classification should be submitted to the university registrar; forms for this 
purpose are available from the Office of the University Registrar. 

A Minor: The residence of a person less than 21 years of age is that of the father. After the death of the father, the 
residence of the minor is that of the mother. If the parents are divorced, the residence of the minor is that of the 
parent who was granted custody by the court; or, if custody was not granted, die residence continues to be that of 
the father. If both parents are dead, the residence of the minor is that of the last surviving parent at the time of that 
parent's death, unless the minor lives with a legal guardian of his or her person duly appointed by a proper court of 
Mississippi, in which case his or her residence becomes that of the guardian. 

An Adult: The residence of an adult is that place where he or she is domiciled; mat is, the place where 
he or she actually physically resides with the intention of remaining there indefinitely or of returning there 
pennanently when temporarily absent. Adult students who are residing outside of the state of Mississippi, 
but whose parents have moved to this state and have become residents, must establish residence in their own 
right. In determining residence for tuition purposes of persons who return to Mississippi after temporary 
departures such as school attendance, work elsewhere, or military service, cognizance is taken for evidence 
showing continuity of state residence and demonstrated intent to return to the state. 

Removal of Parents from Mississippi: If the parents of a minor who is enrolled as a student in an 
institution of higher learning move dieir legal residence from the state of Mississippi, the minor is 
immediately classified as a nonresident student. 

Required 12 Months of Residence: No student may be admitted to the university as a resident of 
Mississippi unless his/her residence, as defined herein above, has been in the state of Mississippi for 
a continuous period of at least 12 months immediately preceding his or her admission. 

A student who has lived within the state for 12 months following his or her 21st birthday may establish 
residence in his or her own right by showing that he or she is living in the state with the intention of 
abandoning his or her former domicile and remaining in the state of Mississippi permanently or for an 
indefinite length of time. Intent may be demonstrated or disproved by factors including, but not limited 
to, filing of Mississippi income tax returns, eligibility to vote in Mississippi, motor vehicle registration in 
Mississippi, possession of a Mississippi operator's license, place of employment, and self support. 

Residence Status of a Married Person: A married person may claim the residence of his or her 
spouse. (Foreign students refer to Legal Residence of a Foreign Student.) 

Children of Parents Who Are Employed by the University: Children of parents who are members 
of the faculty or staff of the university may be classified as residents without regard to the residence 
requirement of 12 months. 

Military Personnel Assigned on Active Duty Stationed in Mississippi: Members of the armed forces 
on extended active duty and stationed within the state of Mississippi may be classified as residents, 
without regard to the residence requirement of 12 months, for the purpose of attendance at the university. 
Resident status of such military personnel who are not legal residents of Mississippi, as defined above 
under legal residence of an adult, shall terminate upon their reassignment for duty in the continental 
United States outside the state of Mississippi. 

Children of Military Personnel: Resident status of children of members of the armed forces on extended active 
duty shall be that of the military parent for the purpose of attending the university during the time that their military 
parents are stationed within the state of Mississippi and shall be continued through the time that military parents are 
stationed in an overseas area with last duty assignment within the.state of Mississippi, excepting temporary training 
assignments en route from Mississippi. Resident status of minor children shall terminate upon reassignment under 
permanent change of station orders of their military parents for duty in the continental United States outside the 
state of Mississippi, excepting temporary training assignments en route from Mississippi. 



Student Expenses and Financial Aid | 47 



Certification of Residence of Military Personnel: A military person on active duty stationed in Mississippi 
who wishes to avail himself or herself or his or her dependents of the provisions of the paragraph tided 
"Military Personnel Assigned on Active Duty Stationed in Mississippi" must submit a certificate from his 
or her military organization showing the name of the military member, die name of the dependent (if for a 
dependent) the name of die organization of assignment and its address (may be in the letterhead), that the 
military member will be on active duty stationed in Mississippi on the date of registration at the university; 
that the military member is not on transfer orders; and the signature of the commanding officer, the adjutant, 
or the personnel officer of the unit of assignment with signer's rank and tide. A military certificate must be 
presented to the registrar of the university each semester at (or within 10 days prior to) registration for the 
provisions of the paragraph "Military Personnel Assigned on Active Duty Stationed in Mississippi", named 
above, to be effective. 

Legal Residence of a Foreign Student: Students with permanent immigrant status or refugee status 
can establish residence in the state by meeting the provisions of the Mississippi Statute. 




48 !| University Facilities and Student Services 



mi 

life 
iiiii 



University Facilities and 
Student Services 



Automobiles on Campus 



Faculty/staff, employees, and students, full time or part time, who operate a vehicle on university- 
controlled property, will be required to purchase a parking permit from the Department of Parking 
Management. Parking permits in the form of hang tags, decals, and temporary permits are available 
from the Department of Parking Management in McLemore Hall, Room 1 52. The department offers 
a brochure detailing parking zones and other traffic regulations. Penalties are assessed for regulation 
violations. For addition information, contact 

The University of Southern Mississippi 
Parking Management 
118 College Drive #10061 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-4943 
www.usm.edu/parking 



Career Services 



Career Services, located on the first floor of McLemore Hall, offers the student three types of 
employment assistance while attending the university: part-time employment, cooperative education 
employment, and career employment upon graduation. 

The Student Employment Division offers the student an opportunity to obtain part-time employment 
while enrolled as a regular student at Southern Miss. The service is comprehensive in that it will 
involve jobs for work-study as well as non-work-study, both on and off campus. 

The Cooperative Education Program affords the student the opportunity to gain a complete 
education with periods of work related to the student's major. The Cooperative Education Office 
assists in finding meaningful jobs that will give the student practical work experience and financial 
support to aid in his or her education. The basic qualifications for the graduate co-op programs are 
as follows: 

1 . admission to a graduate program; 

2. the maintenance of at least a 3.00 overall GPA; and 

3. the student must attend Southern Miss at least one semester prior to placement. 

Students are eligible to enter the program at any time during their career at Southern Miss after the first 
semester. Salaries of co-op students vary depending on the type of degree they are pursuing and the 
amount of co-op experience they have. The Office of Cooperative Education will determine the 
eligibility of the student to participate in the program. Once an active participant, each student's 
record of performance will be periodically reviewed, and a student may be placed on probation or 
removed from the program if not meeting minimum requirements. 

The Career Center in McLemore Hall, Room 125, is Southern Miss' professionally staffed resource 
center specializing in career and job search advising. A variety of services to assist students in 
pursuing a career include individual counseling appointments; on-campus interviews; the Career 
Resource Center; credential services; job search consultations; employment listings on the Career 
Services Web site (www.usm.edu/cs), and resume referrals to job openings. Students are encouraged 
to register with this office at least three semesters prior to their anticipated graduation date. Services 
are available for all Southern Miss students and alumni. Comprehensive information describing 
services is located on the Career Services Web site. 



University Facilities and Student Services j| 49 



For additional information, contact 

The University of Southern Mississippi 
Student Employment Division 

118 College Drive #5014 
Hattiesburg MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-4157 



The University of Southern Mississippi 
Cooperative Education Program 

118 College Drive #5014 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-4844 






The University of Southern Mississippi 
The Career Center 

118 College Drive #5014 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-4153 

Health Services 

The Southern Miss Student Health Services (clinic) can provide the students, faculty, and staff with 
the same services available at a family doctor's office. The Student Health Services provides a wide 
range of services, including laboratory testing, x-ray, pharmacy, dietary counseling and educational 
services. The Student Health Services is staffed by several competent physicians and nurse practi- 
tioners. The Student Health Services is located on the west side of Kennard-Washington Hall. During 
the fall and spring semesters, the Student Health Services hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday and 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. on Friday. There is a $5.00 charge for every visit for students. 
They can pay with cash, credit card, or charge this to their student ID. The staff and faculty pay at 
the time of visit a $38.00 office visit, cash or credit card. 

The Southern Miss Student Health Services is accredited by the Accreditation Association for 
Ambulatory Health Care, Inc. (AAAHC) and is a member of the American College Health 
Association. For more information, please call (601) 266-5390, or visit our Web site at www.usm. 
edu/healthservice. 

Office for Disability Accommodations (ODA) 

In accordance with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), 
The University of Southern Mississippi provides reasonable accommodations for students with 
disabilities through the Office for Disability Accommodations (ODA). ODA verifies eligibility for 
accommodations and works with eligible students to develop and coordinate plans for the provision 
of accommodations. Eligible students include those who are enrolled in degree and nondegree 
programs offered by The University of Southern Mississippi, are considered qualified to meet all 
university program requirements despite a disability, and meet the definition of disability as defined 
by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the ADA. To receive accommodations, students must self- 
identify with the ODA. 

Accommodations may include exam modifications, assistive technology, accessible housing, 
document conversion, interpreters, note-takers, and readers. In order to receive appropriate and 
timely accommodations, eligible students should contact the ODA before the semester begins to 
file an application and submit documentation of the disability for review. The ODA is committed to 
creating a positive campus environment where students with disabilities are encouraged to pursue 
careers on the basis of personal interest and ability. 

For an application and guidelines for documentation of disability, contact The University' of 
Southern Mississippi, Office for Disability Accommodations, 118 College Drive #8586, Hattiesburg, 
MS 39406-0001; call (601) 266-5024 or (228) 214-3232; or visit the Website www.usm.edu/oda. 
Individuals with hearing impairments can use Mississippi Relay Service at 1-800-582-2233 (TTY) 
to contact campus offices. 



50 |j University Facilities and Student Services 



tali 
lltfi 

§slP! 



Union Complex (Thad Cochran Center, R.C. 
Cook University Union, Hub) 

The Union Complex (Thad Cochran Center, R.C. Cook University Union and Hub) is the center 
of student activities at Southern Miss. The R.C. Cook University Union and Hub house the Union 
and Programs department's administrative offices, student organization offices, post office, 
Seymour's food court, game room and more. 

The Thad Cochran Center, a four level, 237,000 square -foot addition to the R.C. Cook University 
Union and Hub, houses Barnes & Noble @ Southern Miss including retail and textbooks, the 
Fresh Food Company (major dining facility), a monumental mural, grand ballroom, meeting 
rooms, etc. The facility is the largest construction project ever undertaken on the Hattiesburg 
campus of The University of Southern Mississippi. 

Students use the Union Complex for dining services, recreation, social, religious and organiza- 
tional activities. The union is a member of the Association of College Unions International. 



Recreational Sports 



Through recreation, sports competition, special programs, and wellness activities, Recreational 
Sports provides a safe environment while enhancing sportsmanship, leadership, and quality of life 
for a diverse university community. Housed in the Payne Center, Recreational Sports provides an 
opportunity for the campus to take advantage of a variety of services and programs which include 
personal fitness instruction, intramural sports, aquatics, fitness classes, sports clubs, and informal 
recreation activities. 

The Payne Center offers indoor recreational facilities which include four basketball/volleyball courts, 
six badminton courts, four championship racquetball courts, an international size squash court, a 
six-lane indoor pool (M.C. Johnson Natatorium), a one-eighth mile indoor exercise track, sauna, 
free weight, circuit training, cardiovascular workout room, and is fully accessible to the disabled. 
Activities and programs available include more than 40 intramural sports events from flag football 
to putt-putt golf, and sport clubs such as table tennis, fencing, badminton, men's soccer, men's 
rugby, and women's rugby, and a sports officials association. The Fitness Assessment Center provides 
services which include fitness assessment and exercise prescription for the university community at a 
nominal fee. 

Recreational Sports offers outdoor facilities such as the Rails to Trails Gateway at Southern Miss, the 
Intramural Fields, the Bruce and Virginia Wilgus Fitness Trail, outdoor volleyball courts, and Loyalty 
Field. All indoor and outdoor facilities, activities, and programs are supervised by First Aid/CPRO- 
trained personnel to promote a safe recreational environment for participation. For more information 
regarding Recreational Sports programs and services, call (601) 266-5405. 

University Counseling Center 

The primary mission of the USMCC is to provide quality services to USM students by promoting sound 
mental health and the coping skills necessary for successful pursuit of their educational and life goals. As 
mental health professionals, we work in a spirit of collaboration within the division of student affairs to 
support individual responsibility, personal growth, and wellness of all members of the student body. 

USMCC works in conjunction with USM Student Health Services to provide comprehensive mental 
health care. USMCC services include individual, group and couples therapy. Referral for psychiatric 
services at USMSHS is also available if needed. Students seek our services for a wide variety of reasons, 
including difficulty adjusting to university life, anxiety, depression, eating disorders, substance abuse, 
and relationship problems. 

Professional staff at the USMCC include one doctoral psychologist and four masters level counselors. 
All services are confidential, and are currently provided free of charge. 

USMCC participates in the American Psychological Association accredited South Mississippi Psychology 
Internship Program Consortium, in conjuntion with Pine Belt Mental Health and Pine Grove Behavioral 
Health centers. A predoctoral psychology intern rotates through USMCC for six months of each year, 
under the supervision of a licensed doctoral psychologist. 

USMCC is also the recipient of a three year grant to provide suicide prevention education. 



University Facilities and Student Services j 51 



USMCC is located in Kennard- Washington Hall, on the second floor. Hours of operation are between 
8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday to Friday. Walk-in hours are available daily, call 601-266-4829 for specific times. 
Crisis service is available by phone outside normal business hours, by calling the University Police 
Department, (60 1 ) 266-4986, or by paging 1 800342734 1 . 



^-"mp'r^ 



M 



... ,jf& 



University Testing Center 

The Counseling Center is also responsible for the administration of the University Testing Center. 
The Testing Center is located in 213 Walker Science Building and is responsible for coordinating the 
following paper pencil-based standardized tests: the ACT, the GRE Subject Tests, the LSAT, the MCAT, 
and the PRAXIS I and II. The Testing Center also provides computer-based testing services for the 
following tests: the TOEFL, the PRAXIS I, the GMAT, and the GRE General Test. To register for any of 
the aforementioned tests, contact the Testing Center at (601) 266-6123. 



%m 



Veterans Affairs 



Veterans Affairs are administered through the Office of the University Registrar. Assistance is 
given to veterans and dependents of eligible veterans to enable them to derive the maximum 
benefit from their veterans' educational entitlement. 



Distance Education 



The University of Southern Mississippi offers several types of distance education coursework that 
students may choose from for credit towards degree programs: online courses, and IVN courses. 
There is no designation on student transcripts between courses taken in a traditional face-to-face 
setting and those taken through Distance Education. Workloads for distance courses will be similar 
to those courses taken in traditional on-campus format; students should not expect distance courses 
to be "easier", "less demanding" or "less challenging" than traditionally delivered courses. In fact, 
some students may find the fact that they are not meeting with their instructor "in person" is a barrier 
and they may find it difficult to manage their assignments and time wisely. If you are interested 
in Distance Education, please feel free to visit the website for more information: http://www.usm. 
edu/deal 

Online Courses: Fully online courses are those whose traditional meeting times are replaced by 
online resources 50% or more. Online courses are available to any student who has access to a 
computer, printer, and internet service provider. Components in online courses will vary, depending 
on the tools and services the individual instructors wish to use and provide. There is no set template 
that faculty are required to use in developing the online courses, so students may see a great variance 
between individual courses. Faculty will choose how to administer student evaluation; tests may be 
online, given face-to-face in a group setting as arranged by the instructor, or given in a proctored 
environment as arranged by the student. These are issues that will be addressed in the course syllabus. 
For a list of online courses, please refer to http://www.usm. edu/deal for the appropriate semester 
list. 

IVN courses: The Interactive Video Network (IVN) is a real-time, instructor-led course that is 
broadcast to several sites simultaneously. The instructor can be teaching at any designated site, with 
or without a student "audience" with students at several other sites. Students are required to interact 
with the faculty and other students at all sites, just as they would interact in a traditional classroom. 
Testing may be done in several ways, just as with online courses. Again, the testing issue will be 
covered in the course syllabus and students can request clarification from the instructor as needed. 



52 College of Arts and Letters 



College of Arts and Letters 

Graduate Degrees 
2007-2008 



Department/School Major 



Degree 



Master's Level 

Anthropology and 
Sociology 

Art and Design 



Anthropology 
Art Education 



Master of Arts 

Master of Art 
Education 



English 



English 

Creative Writing Emphasis 
Literature Emphasis 



Master of Arts 



Foreign Languages and 
Literatures 



Foreign Languages 
French Emphasis 
Spanish Emphasis 
Teaching English to Speakers of 

Other Languages (TESOL) 

Emphasis 



Master of Arts in 
Teaching of Language 



History 



History 



European History Emphasis 
International Studies Emphasis 
Latin American History Emphasis 
War and Society Emphasis 
United States History Emphasis 



Master of Arts 
Master of Science 



Mass Communication 
and Journalism 



Communication 

Mass Communication Emphasis 
Public Relations 



Master of Arts and 
Master of Science 
Master of Science 



Music 



Music 

Conducting Emphasis 

History and Literature Emphasis 

Performance Emphasis 

Theory' and Composition Emphasis 

Woodwind Performance and 
Pedagogy Emphasis 
Music Education 

Music Education 
(seeking licensure) 



Master of Music 



Master of Music 

Education 
Master of Music 

Education 



College of Arts and Letters ji 53 



Department/School Major 



Degree 



Philosophy and Religion 

Political Science, 
International Development 
and Affairs 

Speech Communication 



Theatre and Dance 



Doctoral Level 

English 



History 



Philosophy 
Political Science 



Communication 

Speech Communication Emphasis 

Theatre 

Directing Emphasis 
Performance Emphasis 
Design and Technical Emphasis 



English 

Creative Writing Emphasis 
Literature Emphasis 

History 



Master of Arts 

Master of Arts 
Master of Science 



Master of Arts and 
Master of Science 

Master of Fine Arts 



Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 



European History Since 1789 Emphasis 
History of the Americas Emphasis 
United States History Emphasis 




Mass Communication 
and Journalism 

Music 



Political Science, 
International Development 
and Affairs 

Speech Communication 



Communication 

Mass Communication Emphasis 

Music Education 
Performance and 
Pedagogy 

International Development 



Communication 

Speech Communication Emphasis 



Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Musical 
Arts 

Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 



54 J College of Arts and Letters 



III 

SEfc'l 

1111 



College of Arts and Letters 



Denise von Herrmann, Ph.D., Interim Dean 
David R. Davies, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Jeanne L. Gillespie, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Steven R. Moser, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
118 College Drive #5004 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-4315 



Mission 

The College of Arts and Letters is committed to help and improve the quality of life through 
excellence in the acquisition, dissemination, and application of knowledge. To this end, members 
of the college are committed to excellence in teaching at all levels, from the general education 
curriculum to advanced graduate studies: serving our communities and professions locally, 
regionally, nationally, and internationally; and researching and performing as represented by the 
full spectrum of interests of social scientists, humanities scholars, and scholars in the fine and 
performing arts. 

Deficiencies 

The College of Arts and Letters retains the right to determine deficiencies in the preparation of 
any graduate student, regardless of the number of course credits accumulated. The college will 
recommend appropriate means of removing such deficiencies. 

Examinations and Performance Evaluations 

Some degree programs require entrance qualifying examinations, auditions, or performance 
evaluations. Admission to most graduate programs requires submission of test scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination and TOEFL score for international applicants. Some departments 
accept the MAT for master's degree programs. The departmental sections following in this Bulletin 
list general requirements for each degree program. Prospective students should confer with the 
department chair for full details. Approval of the graduate faculty in the appropriate department 
must be granted before a student will be accepted into a graduate degree program in any area of Arts 
and Letters. 

Final comprehensive examinations at or near the completion of the course work are required for 
all graduate degrees. The type, scope, and dates of the examinations vary, since they are matters of 
individual departmental policy. Each student pursuing a graduate degree should confer with his or 
her major professor and department chair for full particulars. 

Degree Programs 

The departmental sections following in this Bulletin list specific requirements for each degree 
program. Some provide substantial latitude and flexibility. In many programs - with approval of the 
major professor and department chair - the student may choose a graduate minor in a cognate field. 
Students are responsible for following all general and departmental regulations and are encouraged 
to consult frequently with their department. 

Office of International Education 

Susan Steen, Director 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0047 
www.usni.edu/internationaledu 
(601) 266.4344 

The Office of International Education coordinates programs and services that extend the university 
to our local and global communities. The office provides intensive English language instruction; 
administers the university's extensive study-abroad programs; and coordinates international 
admissions and student services for international students and scholars. 

The office is operationally divided into the English Language Institute; International Programs; and 
International Student and Scholar Services. 



College of Arts and Letters jj 55 



English Language Institute 

Ann Morris, Manager 

118 College Dr. #5065 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

U.S.A. 

(601) 266.4337 

fax (601) 266.5723 

eli@usm.edu 

www.usm.edu/internationaledu/eli 

The English Language Institute (ELI) delivers intensive academic English instruction for 
international students as well as for local residents for whom English is a second language. 
Full-time study is 25 hours a week. Part-time enrollment is also possible. Terms are eight weeks 
in duration. The program, which accommodates students from beginning to advanced language 
proficiency, is attended by students from every major continent. 

The ELI fosters cross-cultural awareness within the university and the community by offering 
ELI students opportunities for interaction with native English speakers, both on and off campus. 

Founded in 1947, the ELI is among the oldest language institutes in the United States, The 
program is a member of the University and College Intensive English Programs consortium 
(UCIEP). 






m 

iill 



International Programs 

Susan Steen, Director 
118 College Drive #10047 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

U.S.A. 

(601) 266.4344 

fax (601) 266.5699 

wwvv.usm.edu/internationaledu/ip 

International Programs administers a variety of programs providing Southern Miss students long- 
term and short-term opportunities to study abroad for academic credit. Short-term programs offering 
regular Southern Miss academic credit include the following: 

The British Studies Program, a summer term in London in which Southern Miss functions as the 
academic and logistical linchpin for a consortium comprising The University of Memphis, Hinds 
Community College, Texas A&M University - Commerce, The University of Louisiana - Monroe, 
Southeastern Louisiana University, Mississippi College, Henderson State University, Cameron 
University, the College of Charleston, and Mercer University. 

The Art in Italy Program 

The Caribbean Studies Program in Jamaica 

The Field Research Abroad Program in Belize 

The French Studies Program 

The Honduran Dolphin Research Program 

The Honduran Field Studies Program in Geography 

The Religion in Tibet Program 

The Spanish Language Program in Puebla, Mexico 

The Spanish Language Program in Madrid, Spain 

Other academic study-abroad programs coordinated by this office include The Abbey of Pontlevoy, 
a semester-abroad program in France designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. 
Southern Miss leads a consortium of .1 1 U.S. universities for The Abbey program. 

Semester- and year-abroad exchanges: 
Ecole Superieure du Commerce Exterieur, France 
Exeter University, England 
Universite de Perpignan, France 
Keele University, Stoke-on-Trent, England 
Macquarie University, Sydney Australia 
University of Alcala de Henares, Madrid, Spain 
University of Jaen, Spain 
University of Bonn, Germany 
University of Victoria, Canada 



56 j College of Arts and Letters 



University of Wales, Swansea 

University of the Yucatan, Merida, Mexico 

University of Orleans, France 

In addition, a student practice teaching program in England for education majors is offered in the 
fall and spring semesters. 



i|3 






International Student and Scholar Services 

Barbara Jackson, Administrator 

118 College Drive #5151 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

U.S.A. 

(601) 266.4841 

fax (601) 266.4898 

www.usm.edu/internationaledu/isss_l/isss_home.htm 

isss@usm.edu 

International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) coordinates all facets of international admissions 
and student/scholar services. ISSS provides counsel on immigration regulations, personal matters, 
and culture shock and adjustment, as well as some academic counseling in conjunction with 
various departments. The office processes all international applications, evaluates foreign academic 
credentials, and issues the appropriate immigration documents for the nonimmigrant foreign 
student. Intercultural programming for international students and the community is also coordinated 
by ISSS. 

The ISSS office disseminates Southern Miss information to foreign schools, U.S. embassies and 
consulates abroad, and nonprofit international organizations such as the Institute for International 
Education. 

ISSS also provides information to, and immigration documents for, research scholars invited by 
various Southern Miss departments to participate in limited research opportunities. 

Department of Anthropology and Sociology 

James G. Flanagan, Ph.D., Chair 
118 College Drive #5074 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4306 

Danforth, Fennell, Flanagan, Hayden, Hunt, Jackson, Kaufmann, Kinnell, Miller, Young 

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology offers graduate work leading to the master's degree 
in anthropology and a minor in the master's and doctoral degree programs of other departments. The 
Department of Anthropology and Sociology also offers a graduate minor in sociology for students in 
the master's and doctoral degree programs of other departments. 

Master's Program in Anthropology 

The Department of Anthropology and Sociology offers programs within the College of Arts and 
Letters leading to the master of arts degree in anthropology. 

General academic and admission requirements for all graduate degrees are set forth in the front 
section of the Bulletin. The Anthropology Graduate Admissions Committee will review the 
following materials in determining an applicant's eligibility for admission as a regular student in the 
program. (1) three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's academic 
background and qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study; (2) a statement 
of purpose which describes the applicant's reasons for wishing to pursue a graduate degree in 
anthropology and the subfield of specialization which he/she intends to pursue; (3) undergraduate 
transcript (successful applicants in the past have had an undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or above on 
the last 60 hours); and (4) official GRE scores. Students who fail to meet the entrance criteria on 
one of the four dimensions but who show considerable promise based on the other criteria will 
be considered for conditional admission. Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly 
encouraged to apply. 



College of Arts and Letters 57 



Master of Arts 

A minimum of thirty-three (33) semester hours, eighteen (18) of which must be earned at the 600 
level or above; and completion of four seminars in anthropology (ANT 621, 631, 641, 651) with a 
3.0 GPA in these courses. No more than six (6) hours of field methods courses (ANT 516, 536) and 
no more than nine (9) hours of independent study courses (ANT 692, 792) will be applied toward 
the degree. Also required is proficiency in one foreign language or quantitative research methods; 
successful completion of a comprehensive examination; and submission of an approved thesis. A 3.0 
GPA is required for graduation. Students must submit a plan of study by their second semester to the 
Graduate Studies Office. (See www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/planofstudy.php). 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Dual Master's Degrees Program in Anthropology and History 

Description of Program: 

This program, leading to master degrees in anthropology and history, emphasizes applied aspects 
of cultural and heritage studies to prepare graduates to work in public settings such as museums, 
archives, historic preservation, oral history programs, or in government or private-sector heritage 
resource management. 

Students must apply to and be accepted by both master programs. Students pursue the two degrees 
simultaneously, and neither degree is awarded until the entire program is completed. Students who 
withdraw from the dual master's programs in favor of one of the two disciplines will be bound by 
the degree requirements of that discipline. 
A. Course Work: 
Anthropology 

I. Required 

ANT 621 Seminar in Ethnology (3 hours) 

ANT 631 Seminar in Archaeology (3 hours) 

ANT 641 Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3 hours) 

ANT 651 Seminar in Anthropological Linguistics (3 hours) 

ANT 537 Heritage Resources and Public Policy (3 hours) 

ANT 691 Internship (6 hours) 

ANT 698 Thesis (3 hours) 

II. Electives (6 hours) 

ANT 526 American Folklore 
ANT 533 Prehistory of the Southeastern U.S. 
ANT 534 Historical Archaeology 
History 

I. Required 

HIS 710 (3 hours) Philosophy and Methods of History 
HIS 71 1 (3 hours) Research Seminar in American History 
HIS 698 (3 hours) Thesis 
HIS 695 (6 hours) Internship in Public History 

II. Choose One (3 hours) 

HIS 725 Interpretations and Themes in American History to 1865 
HIS 726 Interpretations and Themes in American History since 1 865 

III. History Electives (6-9 hours) 
History or Anthropology 

I. Required 

ANT 605/HIS 605 Presenting Heritage I (3 hours) 
ANT 606/HIS 606 Presenting Heritage II (3 hours) 



,v : :: :l 



mm;: 



mr 



58 || College of Arts and Letters 



1 



B. Comprehensive Examination in Anthropology 

C. Comprehensive Examination in History 

D. Proficiency in One Foreign Language or Quantitative Methods 

E. Thesis 

Dual Master's Degrees Program in Anthropology and Library Science 

General Provisions 

Students must apply and be accepted to both master programs. Students pursue the two degrees 
simultaneously and neither degree is awarded until the entire program is completed. Students who 
withdraw from the dual master's program in favor of one of the two disciplines will be bound by 
the degree requirements of that discipline. In the event that either one of the two programs should 
change their master's requirements, incoming students will be held to the new requirement(s) and 
currently enrolled students will be "grandfathered." Students must gain approval for their thesis 
topics from both programs. The successful thesis must also be approved by both programs. This 
means that students must have a thesis committee on which faculty from both programs serve. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

A. Coursework: 

1. Required: A total of 60 hours (30 hours each) in LIS and ANT (not including Graduate School 
mandated foreign language/quantitative research requirements). Students must take 1 8 hours at the 
600 level in each program. 

a. Library Science (24 hours) 

LIS 501 Introduction to Reference Resources and Services 

LIS 505 Cataloging and Classification 

LIS 511 Development of Library Collections 

LIS 605 Library Management 

LIS 636 The Library in American Society 

LIS 651 Introduction to Information Science 

LIS 666 Social Science Resources 

LIS 691 Research (3 credits) 

b. Anthropology (12-15 hours) 

(a minimum of three of the following four seminars) 

Students must take the seminar in their subfield of specialization. 

ANT 62 1 Seminar in Ethnology 

ANT 631 Seminar in Archaeology 

ANT 641 Seminar in Physical Anthropology 

ANT 651 Seminar in Anthropological Linguistics 

ANT 698 Thesis (3 hours) 



2. Electives 



a. Library Science (6 hours) 

LIS 533 History of the Book 

LIS 646 Special Collections and Archives 

LIS 647 Introduction to Archival Administration 

LIS 679 Preservation of Documentary Materials 

b. Anthropology (15-18 hours) 

*No more than 6 hours of field methods courses (ANT 516 and 536), no more than 9 hours of 
independent study (ANT 692/792) 

*Number of anthropology hours must total 30. 

B. Proficiency in one foreign language (see Graduate Bulletin) or two semesters (6 hours) of 
graduate level quantitative research methods. (0-9 hours) 

C. a comprehensive exam in library and information science 

D. a comprehensive exam in anthropology 

E. a thesis 



College of Arts and Letters 



59 



Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



Department of Art and Design 

Susan Fitzsimmons, MFA, Chair 
118 College Drive #5033 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4972 

Baggett, Fitzsimmons, Goggin, Gorzegno, Meade, Torres 

Master of Art Education Degree 

The University of Southern Mississippi is a fully accredited institutional member of the National 
Association of Schools of Arts and Design (NASAD) and the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education (NCATE). The Department of Art offers a program leading to the master 
of art education degree. Regular admission to the program is based on an evaluation of multiple 
criteria, which includes a minimum undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 in the applicant's 
major field of study, submission of test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), 
a portfolio review, and three letters of recommendation from people qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study. The portfolio portion of the application materials needs 
to be a comprehensive overview of the depth and breath of the candidate's visual arts skills. 
Conditional admission may be granted if the regular admission criteria are not met. Students must 
achieve regular admission before becoming candidates for the degree as well as for eligibility for 
assistantships. Undergraduate prerequisites for the master of art education degree in the Department 
of Art and Design are: (1) completion of a bachelor's degree in art education at The University of 
Southern Mississippi or an equivalent program, or (2) completion of any degree in the visual arts, or 
(3) satisfaction of Mississippi Class A teacher certification requirements in art. 

Each student must demonstrate a studio proficiency appropriate for entry into graduate study by 
presenting a portfolio for review by the art education faculty, the studio faculty in the student's 
particular studio area, and the chair of the Department of Art and Design. Deficiencies which 
are identified may be removed with the successful completion of one or more of the nondegree 
credit courses (ARE 600 and/or ART 600) with a grade of no lower than "B" and/or by taking 
undergraduate course work as prescribed by the student's major professor and graduate advisory 
committee. 

There are two tracks for the master of art education degree. Track 1 is for students who wish to 
pursue a practice-oriented degree with 18 semester hours in art studio courses. Track 2 is designed 
for students who prefer a research-oriented degree, which includes 9 semester hours in studio 
work, a six-hour thesis, or a nonthesis option (6 hours of ARE 691 or ARE 692). All students will 
culminate their program of studies with a written comprehensive exam. At least 18 hours of course 
work must be at the 600 level or higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of tliis Bulletin. 

Departmental Admissions 

Deadlines for submission of application material (comprehensive portfolio, proposal, three letters of 
recommendation, official transcripts, and GRE scores) are as follows: 

For Summer Semester 2006: Deadline -April I, 2007 

For Fall Semester 2006: Deadline -April 1, 2007 

For Spring Semester 2007: Deadline - November 1 , 2006 

Applicants must satisfy university admission requirements before becoming candidates for the 
degree or becoming eligible for assistantships. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Requirements for a master of art education degree are as follows: 

or (Practice -Oriented) 

12 hours of Art Education (including ARE 657). 

1 8 hours of Art Studio (from graduate drawing, painting, ceramics, printmaking, and sculpture). 
9 hours in Art History (Elect from ART 500, 53 1 , 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 598). 

39 total hours (45, if option is chosen to take REF 601, 607 in order to acquire state certification) 



60 | College of Arts and Letters 



or (Research-Oriented) 

1 8 hours of Art Education (including ARE 657). 

9 hours of Art Studio (ARE 607 which may be repeated or ART 550 which may be repeated). 

6 hours of Art Education Research (ARE 698, thesis), or (ARE 691 which may be repeated), or 

(ARE 692 which may be repeated) 
3 hours of Art History (Elect from ART 500, 53 1 , 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 598). 

36 total hours 

Six additional hours of Research and Foundations (REF 601, 607) are required for Mississippi 

Class AA certification and can be taken with either track (students must already have Class A 

certification) These hours are optional 

; Candidates in Track 1 must culminate their studies with an exhibition indicating achievements 
, | within their specialized studio areas. Candidates in Track 2 may elect to exhibit work from their 
'-] specialized area of study. 



a*i 



sifc^w^iiSiKi;*; 



Department of English 



|§fll W. Michael Mays, Ph.D., Chair 



gj 118 College Drive #5037 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-4319 

Ball, Barron, E Barthelme, S. Barthelme, Franke, Harris, Hauer, Hillard, Iglesias, J. Johnson, S. Johnson, 

Jordan, Kolin, Lares, Mays, Pierce, Ryan, Salda, Sciolino, Tribunella, K. Watson, W. Watson, Weinauer 

The Department of English offers programs leading to the doctor of philosophy and master of arts 
degrees. Within the framework of these degree programs, students may specialize in literature or in 
creative writing. 

General academic and admission requirements for all graduate degrees are set forth in the 
front section of this Bulletin and general departmental requirements are listed below. Specific 
requirements for degrees and specializations are described in Guidelines for Graduate Study, 
available as a PDF file from the departmental website or as a printed document from the department. 
Students interested in applying for assistantships should contact the Department of English. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of tins Bulletin. 

The Master of Arts 

Departmental criteria for admission include the GRE, GPA, and letters of recommendation. 
Successful applicants for regular admission to the MA. program usually have a GPA of 3.5 or 
higher in undergraduate English courses. Letters of recommendation should be from persons 
qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department. 
Conditional admission is sometimes possible for applicants who do not meet all the criteria for 
regular admission. Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 
Requirements for the master of arts degree include the following:* 

1 . A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours of graduate credit including at least twelve (12) hours in 
an emphasis area such as English Literature, American Literature, or Creative Writing. 
A minimum of 1 8 of the 30 hours must be taken at the 600-level or above with six in the emphasis 
area; however, English 714 and 791 may not be used to satisfy this requirement. A 3.0 GPA is 
required for graduation. 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. ENG 506 (with approval, another linguistics course may be substituted) and ENG 640 are required 
for candidates in literature. 

4. Foreign language proficiency. (See the appropriate section of the Bulletin.) 

5. Thesis (six hours credit). 

6. A comprehensive oral examination on the thesis and the related emphasis area. 
*Candidates desiring AA certification must include, in addition, REF 601 and REF 607. 



College of Arts and Letters jj 61 



The Doctor of Philosophy 

The doctor of philosophy degree offered by the Department of English is designed to prepare 
students for careers as scholars and teachers. This degree is taken after the candidate has earned an 
appropriate master's degree and has met all university and departmental admission requirements. 
The department has several criteria for admission, including the GRE, letters of recommendation, 
and GPA. Letters of recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department. Successful applicants for 
regular admission to the Ph.D. program must have a GPA of 3.5 or higher in master's coursework. 
Conditional admission is sometimes possible for applicants who do not meet all the criteria for 
regular admission. Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. Other g 
departmental requirements follow.* - P<* : ~* 

1 . A minimum of fifty-four (54) semester hours beyond the master's degree including courses in O^ ;< 
bibliography and methods and literary criticism. No more than 6 hours at the 500 level can count 31b^ h. 
toward the degree. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. i-p " v <v 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate ;'--.£-' ' 



Studies Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. Tine Plan of Study Forms are 



• 

available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. i'~ 

3. A qualifying examination. 

4. Research Tool(s). Proficiency in two foreign languages or one foreign language and twelve graduate 
hours in an approved area other than English. Details are available from the English department. 

5. A written comprehensive examination. 

6. Presentation and oral defense of dissertation. 

7. Residency. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

*Precise details of the doctoral program and admission procedures are available from the 
Department of English. 

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures 

William W. Powell, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5038 

Hatriesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-4964 

Burnett, Clark, Douglass, Fonder-Solano, Gillespie, Mikulec, Miles, Odom, Powell, Sdnchez-Alonso 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers a program leading to the master of 
arts in teaching of language (MATL) degree. Within the MATL, students usually concentrate on 
one of three emphasis areas: French, Spanish, or Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 
(TESOL). The focus of the MATL is on developing and enhancing the knowledge and skills 
in language, language acquisition, and language instruction that are essential for both effective 
teaching and successful learning. The MATL is offered year-round, with the option of completing 
the program through summer only registration and/or online course work. For more information on 
the MATL, please consult http://www.usm.edu/matl. 

The MATL, with a summer site in Mexico, brings together foreign language teachers and teachers- 
to-be from all parts of the United States and from several countries to share their experiences 
and significantly enhance their professional and academic training in an enriching, multicultural 
environment. 

MATL Philosophy 

The Master of Arts in the Teaching of Languages is a unique program of professional preparation 
specifically designed to meet the needs of teachers from elementary and secondary education 
through the junior and community college levels. The MATL is not a literature degree; instead 
our purpose is to provide students with courses that meet their needs as foreign language teachers. 
Designed to integrate theory and practice, the MATL program focuses on the enhancement of 
language teaching skills and knowledge about language and language learning. 



62 I College of Arts and Letters 



III 
t§fi 
1§) 



The 1VIATL program meets the requirements for AA licensure for those holding a current Mississippi 
teaching license in French or Spanish (the MATL is not designed for initial teacher certification 
or licensure). Applicants from other states should check with their respective state departments of 
education for specific requirements concerning certification or licensure. The department also offers 
a program of study for the ESL endorsement to a current Mississippi teaching license in any area. 
Please contact the coordinator of the MATL program for details. 

Admission Requirements 

Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply for admission to the 
MATL program. The following materials are reviewed in the admission process: 

1 . Official scores for the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT). 

2. Official transcripts for all previous undergraduate and graduate studies. Successful applicants in 
the past have had undergraduate grade point averages over the last 60 hours of undergraduate study 
that range from 2.75 to 4.0 on a 4.0 scale. 

3. For international students whose native language is not English, official scores on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Successful applicants in the past have had a total TOEFL 
score of 220 or above, with no section score lower than 21, on the computer-based test, or 83, with 
no section score beneath 19, on the Internet-based test. 

4. Applicants to the Spanish and French emphases of the MATL should have an undergraduate degree 
in the language or present evidence of equivalent language experience. 

5. Three letters of recommendation from professionals in the field qualified to assess the readiness of 
the applicant for graduate work. The letters should be sent to the department. 

See the "Academic Requirements" section of the Graduate Bulletin for other general requirements. 
Conditional admission may be considered for applicants who do not meet all the criteria but show 
promise for success in graduate studies. The requirements for a change to regular admission will be 
stated at the time of acceptance into the program. 

General Program Academic Requirements 

All students are expected to complete the following requirements: 

1 . A total of thirty-three (33) hours of graduate level courses, including eighteen (1 8) hours in 
courses numbered 600 or above. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. FL561,FL663,FL664,andFL665 

4. A practicum tailored to the teaching experience of each student (FL 694) 

5. For students in the TESOL emphasis, a minimum of 9 hours of courses with a TSL prefix, 
including the required TSL 612 

6. For students in the Spanish or French emphasis areas, a minimum of 15 hours of graduate-level 
courses in the specific language 

7. A language proficiency requirement, as determined by departmental policy, within the specific 
emphasis area. In addition, students in the TESOL emphasis whose first language is English must 
also meet a foreign language requirement by completing nine (9) hours of undergraduate 
conversational foreign language study (i.e., through USM 201 level) or equivalent with an 
average of "B" or better. 



8. Comprehensive examination which consists of a successful defense of a portfolio 

All students are required to prepare an individualized Program Plan with an adviser. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



College of Arts and Letters 63 



Department of History 



Phyllis G. Jestice, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5047 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4333 

Austin, Barnett, Bristol, Chambers, Franklin, Haley, Jestice, Kyriakoudes, La Pierre, Mackaman, Neiberg, 

Nelson, Nuwer, O'Brien, Polushin, Scarborough, Sloan, Smith, Tyler, Wiest, Zelner 

The Department of History participates in programs leading to the degrees of master of arts, master 
of science, and doctor of philosophy. 

General Regulations 

The student is held responsible for following all graduate regulations. The student's major professor 
will help in any way possible, but the student is expected to know what is required and to take full 
responsibility. General academic and admission requirements for all graduate degrees are set forth in 
another section of this Bulletin, and general departmental requirements are listed below. 

Master's Programs 

Admission Requirements 

For admission to the master's program, the department requires a 3.0 minimum grade point average 
on the last two years of undergraduate study, GRE general test scores, transcripts, three letters of 
recommendation, a statement of career objectives (250 to 500 words), and an example of written 
work (up to 20 pages). Letters of recommendation should be from people qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department. Normally, applicants 
will have taken a variety of upper-division history courses. 

Students with perceived academic deficiencies may be admitted conditionally. To remove the 
conditional status, students must meet Graduate School requirements, which are described in the 
Admission Requirements section of the Bulletin, and they must satisfy all additional requirements 
stipulated by the chair and director of Graduate Studies. 

In addition to the Graduate School criteria for regular admission, students whose native language 
is not English must score at least 550 on the TOEFL Examination (213 on the computer-based 
examination). The department presumes that applicants who have fulfilled these requirements 
possess an adequate knowledge of English. If, upon their arrival at the university, it is determined 
that they do not possess an adequate command of English, the department reserves the right to 
require appropriate remedial courses. 

Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Retention Policy 

The Department of History has a retention policy more stringent than the general policy of the 
graduate school. The department's policy is published in its Handbook. Students should consult the 
Handbook for a description of the policy. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



Master of Arts 

All students are expected to complete the following requirements: 

1 . A total of thirty (30) semester hours in history with twenty-one (21) hours in courses numbered 
over 600. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Only one HIS 692 will count toward the degree. 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Foiin to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. HIS 7 1 at its first offering by the department. 



64 |j College of Arts and Letters 



4. HIS 725 and HIS 726 for those concentrating in United States History; HIS 720 and an additional 
seminar for those in European History; HIS 781 and HIS 782 for those in Latin American History. 

5. HIS 71 1 or HIS 712 depending on the emphasis area. Students whose major field is in Latin 
American History will take HIS 711 unless otherwise advised by the director of Graduate Studies. 

6. A reading knowledge of one foreign language. Students in Latin American History must have a 
reading knowledge of either Spanish or Portuguese. 

7. A thesis, which will confer six (6) hours credit within the minimum hourly requirements 

8. During the spring semester of the second year, the student will take a comprehensive written 
examination. 

9. A thesis defense is required. 



lif" 



Master of Science 

All students are expected to complete the following requirements: 

1 . A total of thirty (30) semester hours with twenty-one (2 1 ) hours in courses numbered above 600. A 
3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Only one HIS 692 will count toward the degree. 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. HIS 71 at its first offering by die department. 

4. HIS 725 and HIS 726 for those concentrating in United States History, HIS 720 and an additional 
seminar for those in European History; HIS 781 and HIS 782 for those in Latin American History. 

5. HIS 71 1 or HIS 712 depending on the emphasis area. Students whose major field is in Latin 
American History will take HIS 711 unless otherwise advised by the director of Graduate Studies. 

6. During the spring semester of the second year, the student will take a comprehensive written 
examination. 

Emphasis Areas 

The Department of History offers the following areas of emphasis for the master of arts and master 
of science degrees: 

I. United States History 

II. European History 

III. Latin American History 

IV. International Studies 

V. War and Society 

In the comprehensive examination, all master's students must demonstrate proficiency in one primary area 
of emphasis and one secondary area. Two members of the examining committee will represent the primary 
area, and one member will represent the secondary area. United States History, European History, and 
Latin American History may be selected as either primary or secondary areas. Asian History or African 
history may be selected only as a secondary area. The nature and scope of the material to be included from 
each area will be determined by the graduate committee. 

The M. A. student should successfully complete fifteen (15) hours of course work in the primary area 
and six (6) hours in the secondary area in addition to History 710 and the 6 hours of thesis work. 

The MA. thesis must be written in the primary emphasis area. A student may write a thesis in Asian 
or African History if permission to do so is granted by the department. 

The M.S. student should take eighteen (18) hours of course work in the primary area and nine (9) 
hours in the secondary area in addition to History 710. 

Students planning to pursue a doctoral degree must write a thesis and should enroll in the M.A. 
program. 



College of Arts and Letters 65 



Master of Arts or Master of Science, International Studies Emphasis 

This program is intended for graduate students in History with an International Studies orientation. 
Students must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Successful completion of thirty-six (36) semester hours with eighteen (1 8) hours in History and 
eighteen (18) in political science (18 hours must be 600 level or higher), as follows: 

a. Twelve (12) hours of core courses: HIS 710, HIS 720, HIS 725, HIS 726, HIS 781, or 
HIS 782; PS 730; PS 731; and PS 750 

b. The remainder of course work selected from the following: HIS 711 or 712, HIS 732, ^^ 
HIS 733, HIS 734, HIS 736. HIS 740, HIS 745, HIS 772, HIS 774, HIS 782, PS 504, PS 

508, PS 521, PS 531, PS 532, PS 535, PS 550, PS 551, PS 552, PS 556, PS 558, PS 585, PS 721, ;•-; "0 

and PS 750. 

c. With the approval of the director of Graduate Studies, students may earn up to nine (9) '?'&& 
hours in relevant 500-level history courses and may earn six (6) hours through study-abroad 
programs. 

d. Only one HIS 692 will count toward the degree. 



t 4 



HI 



2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatcstudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. Students seeking a Master of Arts degree must write and defend a thesis, which will confer six (6) 
hours of credit within the minimum hourly requirements. 

4. A reading knowledge of one foreign language 

5. The student's graduate committee will consist of two members from the History department and 
one member from the Political Science department.. 

6. During the spring semester of the second year, the student will take a comprehensive written 
examination. 

7. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Master of Arts or Master of Science, War and Society Emphasis 

This program is intended for graduate students in History with a war and society orientation. 
Students must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Successful completion of thirty (30) semester hours (18 hours of 600 level or higher) as follows: 
a Nine (9) hours of core courses: HIS 710, HIS 711, or HIS 712; HIS 720; HIS 725 and/or 
HIS 726, or HIS 782. 

b. The remainder of course work selected from the following: HIS 510, HIS 511, HIS 512, 
HIS 513, HIS 515, HIS 516, HIS 517, HIS 530, HIS 531, HIS 532, HIS 533, HIS 534, 
HIS 537, HIS 541, HIS 543, HIS 544, HIS 556, HIS 558, HIS 561, HIS 563, HIS 566, 
HIS 573, HIS 583, HIS 585, HIS 734, HIS 736, HIS 745, and HIS 782. 

c. Only one HIS 692 will count toward die degree. 



2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester diey are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. Students seeking a master of arts degree must write and defend a thesis, which will confer six (6) 
hours of credit within die minimum hourly requirements. 

4. A reading knowledge of one foreign language. 

5. During the spring semester of the second year, the student will take a comprehensive written 
examination. 

6. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 



66 



|| College of Arts and Letters 



iiilll 



lilflE 






Dual Master's Degrees in History and Library and Information Science 

In cooperation with the School of Library- and Information Science, the Department of History 
offers a combined program leading to two master's degrees: master in Library and Information 
Science and master of arts in History. Students will pursue both degrees simultaneously, and neither 
degree will be awarded until the entire program is completed. Students who withdraw from the dual 
master's program in favor of one of the two disciplines will be bound by the degree requirements of 
that discipline. The combined program includes thirty (30) hours in Library and Information Science 
and thirty (30) hours in History for a total of sixty (60) hours. Students in the combined program 
must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Thirty (30) hours in Library and Information Science (18 hours at the 600 level or above). 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. Thirty (30) hours in history (1 8 hours at the 600 level or above). Only one HIS 692 will count toward 
the degree. 

4. HIS 710 at its first offering by the department 

5. IAS 720, HIS 725, HIS 726, HIS 781, or HIS 782 

6. One of the following seminars: HIS 71 1, 712, 732, or 745 

7. Six (6) hours of internship 

8. A reading knowledge of one foreign language 

9. A thesis, which will confer six (6) hours credit, three in History and three in Library and 
Information Science; thesis defense is required 

1 0. A comprehensive written examination administered by a three-member committee representing 
both disciplines and given after satisfactory completion of the course work 

11. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Students should refer to the Library and Information Science section of this Bulletin for further details. 

Dual Master's Degrees in History and Anthropology 

In cooperation with the Department of Anthropology, the Department of History offers a combined 
program leading to two master's degrees: master of arts in Anthropology and master of arts in 
History. Students will pursue both degrees simultaneously, and neither degree will be awarded until 
the entire program is completed. Students who withdraw from the dual master's program in favor of 
one of the two disciplines will be bound by the degree requirements of that discipline. The combined 
program includes thirty (30) hours in Anthropology and thirty (30) hours in History for a total of 
sixty (60) hours. Students in the combined program must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Thirty (30) hours in anthropology (18 hours at the 600 level or above). 

2. Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate 
Studies Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are 
available at www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of 
Study" link. 

3. Thirty (30) hours in history (18 hours at the 600 level or above). Only one HIS 692 will count toward 
the degree. 

4. HIS 710 at its first offering by the department 

5. HIS 720, HIS 725, HIS 726, HIS 781, or HIS 782 

6. One of the following seminars: HIS 711, 712, 732, or 745 

7. Six (6) hours of internship 

8. Three (3) or six (6) hours of the following: HIS 605, HIS 606 

9. ANT 537 

10. A reading knowledge of one foreign language 

1 1 . A thesis, which will confer six (6) hours credit, three in History and three in Anthropology; 
thesis defense is required 

12. A comprehensive written examination administered by a three-member committee representing 
both disciplines and given after satisfactory completion of the course work 

13. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Students should refer to the Anthropology section of this Bulletin for further details. 



College of Arts and Letters 67 



Doctoral Program 

Admission Requirements 

For admission to the doctoral program, the department requires a minimum grade point average 
of 3.5 on all graduate work, GRE general test scores, transcripts, three letters of recommendation, 
a statement of career objectives (500 to 1,000 words), and an example of written work (up to 
20 pages). Letters of recommendation should be from people qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department or school. Normally, applicants 
will have completed an MA. in History and written a thesis. General requirements for admission 
can be found in the "Academic Requirements" section of the Bulletin. 

Exceptions to some of the above-listed requirements may be made. Students so accepted will be 
classified "conditional," which is removed by achieving a 3.5 grade point average on twelve (12) 
hours of course work during the first two semesters. 

Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

A minimum of eighty-four (84) semester hours of course credit beyond the baccalaureate degree, which 
includes historiography courses (HIS 720, HIS 725, HIS 726, HIS 781, HIS 782) relevant to the student's 
major and minor fields, an additional 700-level course in the student's major area, two additional courses 
at the 600-level or higher, and twelve hours of dissertation research. Only one HIS 692 taken before the 
comprehensive examination will count toward the degree. Doctoral students are prohibited from taking 
more than three 500-level history courses and no more than four throughout their graduate careers. 
Exceptions to the policy may be made only under unusual circumstances and widi the approval of the 
department coordinator of graduate studies and the student's major professor. All doctoral students will 
take a qualifying examination. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 



ft 

Wi 

u 

i 



Retention Policy 

The Department of History has a retention policy more stringent than the general policy of the 
graduate school. The department's policy is published in its Handbook. Students should consult the 
Handbook for a description of the policy. 



Major and Minor Requirements 

The department offers the doctor of philosophy degree in United States History, in European History 
since 1789, and in History of the Americas. Candidates seeking a doctorate in United States History 
must demonstrate proficiency in United States History to 1877 and United States History since 
1877. In addition, they must develop a minor field in War and Society, Medieval Europe, Early 
Modern Europe, Europe 1789-1870, Europe since 1870, Latin American History to 1830, or Latin 
American History since 1830. Doctoral candidates in United States History must also demonstrate 
proficiency in one of the fields not selected above or in a specialized field such as Mexican or 
British History. For the second minor field, they may also develop an outside minor of twelve (12) 
semester hours in one of the social sciences or humanities. 

Candidates seeking a doctorate in European History must demonstrate proficiency in Europe 
1789-1870 and Europe since 1870. They must develop a minor field in War and Society, United 
States History to 1877, United States History since 1877, Latin American History to 1830, or 
Latin American History since 1830. Doctoral candidates in European History are also required 
to demonstrate proficiency in one of the fields not selected above, or a specialized field such as 
Mexican or Southern History. For the second minor field, they may also develop an outside minor 
of twelve (12) semester hours in one of the social sciences or humanities. 

Candidates seeking a doctorate in History of the Americas must demonstrate proficiency in Latin 
American History to 1830, Latin American History since 1830, as well as United States History to 
1877 or United States History since 1877. Courses taken to fulfill these requirements must include 
HIS 513 or HIS 573, HIS 725 or HIS 726, HIS 745, HIS 781, and HIS 782. Doctoral candidates in 
History of the Americas must also demonstrate proficiency in one minor field appropriate to the 
subject of their dissertation, which may be an outside minor of twelve (12) semester hours in one of 
the social sciences or humanities. 

Minor fields are selected after consultation with the candidate's major professor and graduate 
committee. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



68 College of Arts and Letters 



mm 



Qualifying Exam 

Students are required to take a qualifying exam and should consult with the graduate coordinator. 

Research Tool(s) 

Each prospective candidate for the doctoral degree must demonstrate proficiency in at least one 
foreign language. Candidates in History of the Americas must demonstrate proficiency in Spanish 
or Portuguese. They may also demonstrate proficiency in an appropriate second language, or, in 
consultation with the graduate coordinator and their major professor, they may develop a research 

sag tool, consisting of training in an appropriate discipline or research skill. Candidates in United States 
J history must demonstrate proficiency in at least one foreign language, and they must demonstrate 

fjpj proficiency in a second language or develop a research tool. Candidates in European History must 
demonstrate a reading knowledge in two appropriate foreign languages. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Doctoral Committee 

The student's program will be directed by a five-member graduate committee, consisting of three 
faculty members from the major field and two from the minor fields. This committee will approve 
the dissertation prospectus and conduct the comprehensive examination, which will be administered 
during the third year of study. Additional details are available from the Department of History. 

Dissertation 

A dissertation is expected to be a mature and competent piece of writing, embodying the result of 
significant and original research on a subject chosen by the candidate and approved by the major 
professor and the graduate committee. Candidates in the History of the Americas are expected to 
choose a dissertation topic that details both North American and Latin American perspectives and 
which requires multidimensional research. Upon completion and approval of the dissertation, the 
candidate is expected to stand satisfactorily an examination on the dissertation and the field in which 
the dissertation lies. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

School of Mass Communication and 
Journalism 

Christopher P. Campbell, Ph.D., Director 

118 College Drive #5121 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4258 

www.usm.edu/mcj 

Campbell, Davies, Ellzey, Gentile, Haque, Johnson, Kaul, LeDuff, McDowell, Shin, Wiggins, Xue 

Gene Wiggins, Ph.D., Graduate Coordinator 
118 College Drive #5158 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5652 
communications@usm.edu 

The School of Mass Communication and Journalism provides graduate curricula in mass 
communication as part of a graduate program in communication that is shared with the Department 
of Speech Communication. Master of arts, master of science, and doctor of philosophy degrees 
in communication with an emphasis in mass communication are offered. In addition, a master of 
science in public relations degree is available. 

Master's degree students emphasizing mass communication or majoring in public relations are 
required to have prior academic training or professional experience in the mass media or public 
relations practice. Those not meeting the requirement can be admitted into the program but will 
be required to correct the deficiency without receiving graduate credit for the additional work. 



College of Arts and Letters 



69 



For doctoral students the degree program is structured in consultation with a student's doctoral 
committee. Students entering doctoral study in mass communication from other disciplines may be 
required to take additional course work at lower levels to make up for background deficiencies. 

A course in which a student has earned a grade of D will not apply toward a graduate degree. A 
student who earns more than six hours of D or three hours of F may not be considered a candidate 
for degree. Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA for good standing. 

Deadlines for admission are as follows: 

All admission materials for doctoral students seeking to enroll in spring, summer, and fall terms 
must be received by November 1, March 1, and July 1, respectively. Students seeking assistantships 
for the fall semester are strongly encouraged to apply prior to the March 1 deadline. 

Admission deadlines for master's students are the same as those published by the Graduate School. 

Admission requirements are the same as those of the university, with the following additions: 

Applicants for the Master's Program 

Regular Admission 

Undergraduate Record — A cumulative GPA on the last 60 hours from all institutions of our 
applicants has ranged from 3.0 to 4.0. A 3.0 GPA is required; a 3.0 major GPA is also required. 

Graduate Record Examination — Scores from the GRE must be submitted. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language — Applicants whose native language is not English must 
attain a TOEFL score of 550. 

Letters of Recommendation — Three current letters of recommendation are required and should 
address the applicant's readiness for graduate study. Ordinarily such letters should be requested by 
applicants from faculty in their major field of study who are well-acquainted with the applicant's 
academic abilities. For master's level admission, it is acceptable for one of the letters to be 
submitted by a media or public relations professional who is familiar with the applicant's work and 
his or her suitability for graduate study. 

Applicants with professional experience in media-related fields are encouraged to submit a resume 
of their professional experience and accomplishments. 

Conditional Admission 

Undergraduate Record — The cumulative GPA of die last 60 hours from all institutions is usually 
2.75 or better. 

Graduate Record Examination — GRE scores must be submitted. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language — Applicants whose native language is not English must 
attain a TOEFL score of 550. 

Letters of Recommendation — Three current letters of recommendation are required and should 
address the applicant's readiness for graduate study. Ordinarily such letters should be requested by 
applicants from faculty in their major field of study who are well-acquainted with the applicant's 
academic abilities. For master's level admission, it is acceptable for one of the letters to be 
submitted by a media or public relations professional who is familiar with the applicant's work and 
his or her suitability for graduate study. 

Applicants with professional experience in media-related fields are encouraged to submit a resume 
of their professional experience and accomplishments. 

To remove conditional admission status, doctoral students must earn a 3.0 on the first nine (9) semester 
hours of course work numbered 500 or above or on all course work taken while completing this nine 
(9)-hour requirement. The courses must be taken in die School of Mass Communication and Journalism. 

Applicants for the Doctoral Program 
Regular Admission 

Master's Record — A cumulative GPA of 3.5 or better is required. 
Graduate Record Examination — Scores from the GRE must be submitted. 



Test of English as a Foreign Language- 
attain a TOEFL score of 550. 



-Applicants whose native language is not English must 



70 | College of Arts and Letters 

Letters of Recommendation — Three current letters of recommendation are required and should 
address the applicant's readiness for graduate study. Ordinarily such letters should be requested by 
applicants from faculty in their major field of study who are well-acquainted with the applicant's 
academic abilities. 

Applicants with professional experience in media-related fields are encouraged to submit a resume 
of their professional experience and accomplishments. 

Statement of Goals — Applicants must submit a written statement of goals (500-750 words). This 
statement enables the applicant to discuss career plans, and to supply additional information that 
will assist in selecting those individuals who can most benefit from and contribute to the graduate 
communication programs. 

Conditional Admission 

Students who do not meet the requirements for regular admission may be considered for conditional 
admission. The requirements for letters of recommendation and statement of goals are the same as for 
regular admission. 

To remove conditional admission status, doctoral students must earn a 3.50 on the first nine (9) semester 
hours of course work numbered 600 or above or on all course work taken while completing tliis nine 
(9)-hour requirement. The courses must be in the School of Mass Communication and Journalism. 

Master of Arts Major: Communication 

Thesis Option Emphasis: Mass Communication 

All students pursuing this program in communication must complete the following requirements: 

Hours 

Substantive Core 
MC607,MC608 6 

Research Methods 

MC720 3 

MC 722, MCJ 525, Statistics (any two) 6 

Thesis 6 

Electives in Mass Communication 9 

A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours must be completed, including thesis credit. At least 
eighteen (18) of these hours must be numbered 600 or above. All candidates must pass a 
comprehensive written examination, submit a scholarly thesis, and defend the thesis. In addition 
to minimum credit and thesis requirements, the candidate for the master of arts degree must 
demonstrate proficiency in an approved foreign language not to be counted toward the credit hours 
requirement. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Students are expected to enroll continuously after they have 
taken required coursework until they complete their degree following guidelines published under the 
General Degree Requirements section of this Graduate Bulletin. 

Master of Science Major: Communication 

Non-Thesis Option Emphasis: Mass Communication 

All students pursuing this program in Communication must complete the following requirements: 

Hours 

Substantive Core 
MC607,MC608 6 

Research Methods 

MC720 3 

MC 722, MCJ 525, Statistics (any two) 6 

Electives in Mass Communication 18 

A minimum of thirty-three (33) semester hours must be completed. At least eighteen (18) of 
these hours must be numbered 600 or above. All candidates must pass a comprehensive written 
examination. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



College of Arts and Letters 71 



Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Students are expected to enroll continuously after they have 
taken required coursevvork until they complete their degree following guidelines published under the 
General Degree Requirements section of this Graduate Bulletin. 



Master of Science Major: Public Relations 

All students pursuing a major in public relations must complete the following requirements: 

Hours 

Substantive Core 
MC 607, MC 620, MC 621, MC 626 12 

Research Methods 

MC720 : 3 

MCJ526 3 

Thesis, major project, or internship* 3-6 

Mass Communication Electives** 6-9 

*Students seeking the master of science degree with a major in public relations may choose between 
a thesis and a nonthesis option. Six hours credit is given for a thesis and three hours for a major 
project or internship. 

**Students who did not have undergraduate public relations courses must take MCJ 521, 522, and 526. 

A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours must be completed, including thesis, major project, or 
internship. At least eighteen (18) of these hours must be numbered 600 or above. All candidates 
for the master of science degree with a major in public relations must pass comprehensive written 
examinations, and either submit and defend a scholarly thesis, or complete a major project, or serve 
an approved internship. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Candidates with undergraduate deficiencies must take undergraduate courses to correct the 
deficiency without receiving graduate credit for the additional coursevvork. Candidates with few 
undergraduate deficiencies may be permitted by their academic committees to complete a graduate 
minor pertinent to their area of specialized practice, e.g., social work, public administration, 
business administration, and criminal justice. 



vSV'-/ 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Students are expected to enroll continuously after they have 
taken required coursevvork until they complete their degree following guidelines published under the 
General Degree Requirements section of this Graduate Bulletin. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

The doctor of philosophy degree program is structured in consultation with each student's doctoral 
committee. The program involves study of advanced theory and research in mass communication. 

A four-course sequence in research design and methodology is required of all doctoral students. 
The four courses include: MC 607 - Theories of Mass Communication and MC 608 - Critical 
and Cultural Theory of Mass Communication; MC 720 - Introduction to Graduate Research in 
Communication; MC 722 - Communication Research Methods. Equivalent courses taken at another 
institution will be accepted, pending approval of the director, the major professor, and the instructor 
of the course. 

Students must select one of the following emphasis areas by their second semester: 

1 ) Advertising, 

2) Public Relations, 

3) Mass Communication History and Law, 

4) Media, Culture and Society, and 

5) International Communication. 

The minimum credit requirement for the doctoral degree is fifty-four (54) hours beyond the master's 
degree or eighty-four (84) hours beyond the baccalaureate degree. The student takes rigorous 
written and oral examinations and submits and defends a scholarly dissertation pertaining to the area 
he or she elects to emphasize (see section on General Requirements and Regulations). A 3.0 GPA is 
required for graduation. 



72 3 College of Arts and Letters 



Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Doctoral students may elect an outside minor consisting of twelve (12) hours approved by the major 
professor and academic committee members. Doctoral students must demonstrate proficiency in 
basic communication research design and methodology, as well as competency in basic statistics. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Students are expected to enroll continuously after they have 
taken required coursework until they complete their degree following guidelines published under the 
General Degree Requirements section of this Graduate Bulletin. 



School of Music 



Charles Elliott, Ph.D., Director 
1.18 College Drive #5081 
Harriesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5543 

Adam, Beard, Brumbeloe, Ciraldo, A. Davis, K. M. Davis, Dean, Elliott, Flanery, Fraschillo, Fuller, Goertzen, 
Gwozdz, Hafer, Hightower, Kelly, Kyle, Lee, Leventhal, Machado, Malone, Mezzadri, Moak, Moser, Nicholson, 
Oakes, Panella, Perry, Ragsdale, Redfield, Russakovsky, Shank, Shay, Smith, Tychinski, Velichovski, Woolly, 
Wooton, Zaninelli 

Each student has the final responsibility to ascertain that he or she has complied with all applicable 
bulletin requirements for graduation. Faculty and advisers assist students in developing their programs, 
but they cannot waive or vary degree requirements as they appear in the university Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bidletin. 

Master's Degrees 

There are two master's degrees available in the School of Music, one with a major in music leading 
to the master of music degree, the other with a major in music education leading to the master 
of music education degree. Emphasis areas in the Master of Music degree are: Performance, 
Conducting, Music History and Literature, Theory and Composition, and Woodwind Performance 
and Pedagogy. 

Regular admission procedures governing graduate entrance into The University of Southern 
Mississippi will be required. Details can be found in another section of this Bulletin. 

Admission Requirements: Master's Degrees 

In addition to acceptable grades and test scores, successful applicants to the master's program 
usually have an appropriate baccalaureate degree with a major in music, an acceptable candidacy 
audition (for performance degrees), strong letters of recommendation, and successful personal 
interviews. Letters of recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the school. 

Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. Acceptance to the 
School of Music requires students to meet expectations beyond these requirements; see "Degree 
Candidacy." 

Students who are unable to meet regular admission standards may be considered for conditional 
admission. 

The Graduate Record Examination is required for both conditional and regular admission. 

Degree Candidacy: Master's Degrees 

Degree Candidacy: Admission to graduate study does not imply admission to candidacy for a 
master's degree. A maximum of nine (9) hours of graduate work earned before one has gained 
admission to the School of Music can be applied toward a degree. To gain degree candidacy (i.e., 
admission), one must: 

a) take Diagnostic Entrance Examinations the Friday before school begins; 

b) pass a candidacy audition (master of music degrees only) during the first term of full-time 
residence or before completing nine (9) hours of coursework; see pages 71 through 74, this 
Bulletin: 



College of Arts and Letters 73 



c) pass ali special examinations (see specific areas in which the degree may be earned); 

d) consult with the academic adviser, have an advisory committee appointed, and begin planning 
the total degree program early in the first term of attendance. This process must be completed 
before nine (9) hours have been earned; 

e) complete at least nine (9) hours of graduate coursework relevant to one's degree plan with a 
cumulative grade point average of 3.0; 

f) complete a degree plan, approved by the advisory committee and the academic adviser, 
before earning nine (9) semester hours. If the degree plan is not on file with the 
coordinator before that point, credit hours earned above nine (9) semester hours will not be 
counted toward the degree. 

Students who have not done the above will be asked to withdraw from the graduate music program. -:~? 



Diagnostic Examinations and Auditions: Master's Degrees 



3# i 



Before the first term of full-time enrollment, all graduate students must take diagnostic examinations R 
in music theory and in music history and literature. Students who do not pass the theory diagnostic 
exam must enroll in MUS 620, Music Theory Survey. Students who do not pass the history 
diagnostic exam must enroll in MUS 630, Music History Survey. Many entering students find that p 
they do need to take these courses. MUS 620 and 630 must be taken in the first semester of graduate 
work. Exceptions to this requirement may be granted for the spring semester only and will be 
considered on a case-by-case basis. Part-time students must complete both courses before earning 
nine semester hours. A student with deficiencies may be required to take additional course work 
beyond the minimum required in the degree program. 

Diagnostic examinations are administered on campus each Friday preceding the first day of classes 
in fall, spring, and summer in Fine Arts building, Room 212. 

9 a.m. - Theory 
10:30 a.m. - Music History and Literature 
1-5 p.m. - Advisement/Registration/Fee Payment 

Diagnostic examinations are also administered through the mail. To make the testing process feasible, 
please find a proctor, preferably a teacher in a nearby college or university, to whom we can send copies 
of your examination. Send the name and address to the gradaute coordinator in music. 
Entrance auditions are also required for some degrees. These are: 

Master of Music in Performance, in Woodwind Performance and Pedagogy 
in Conducting, in Theory and Composition 
in Woodwind Performance and Pedagogy 

The master of music in theory and composition and the doctor of musical arts in composition require 
submission of representative scores of the prospective student's compositions. 

All graduate students should consult the academic adviser for current, specific policies governing 

the advisement of students, the presentation of recitals, and the administration of comprehensive 

examinations. 

Ensemble Participation: Master's Degrees 

All full-time master's-level students majoring in music or music education are required to 
participate in a major ensemble during each term of residence. A maximum of two (2) hours of 
graduate credit earned from ensemble work may be counted toward the degree. The ensemble in 
which one participates will be determined by the student's major applied area and area of interest. 
The following are considered to be appropriate major ensembles to fulfill this requirement: 
Orchestra, Band, Southern Chorale, Jazz Lab Band, Hattiesburg Choral Union, University Singers, 
and Opera/Music Theatre. Exceptions may be granted to master's students in residence during 
summer semesters. 

For master's students whose major instrument is piano, the following would constitute ensemble 
participation: performing as a pianist with the Orchestra, Band, Southern Chorale, Jazz Lab Band, 
Hattiesburg Choral Union, University Singers, Opera/Music Theatre, Chamber Music, Collegium 
Musicum, or other appropriate major ensemble. Studio accompanying may fulfill the ensemble 
requirement if approved by the piano faculty. (These students should register for their own teacher's 
section of MUS 692, Special Problems.) 

Special Examinations and Auditions: Master's Degrees 

All special examinations and auditions must be passed before one can gain degree candidacy. 



mm 



74 j College of Arts and Letters 



Hi 



Jury Requirements/Final Examinations: Master's Degrees 

Students who are enrolled in MUP private lessons in their principal applied area and who are 
seeking the master of music degree (with emphasis in Performance, Piano Accompanying, or 
Woodwind Performance and Pedagogy) must perform a jury for the appropriate applied faculty. 
All others enrolled in MUP private lessons must perform a final examination for the applied 
teacher. At the finish of each semester and summer term, the applied teacher must complete a Final 
Jury/Examination Form for each student and file it with the graduate adviser. Students enrolled 
in applied music who do not take a final examination or a jury will receive the grade "I" or "F." 
All grades of I must be completed by the end of the next semester (excluding summer term). See 
Grading System in this Bulletin. 

The applied teacher must record and submit any exception to this policy to the graduate adviser; 
signatures of all appropriate area faculty must be included on this form. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
ps|§ Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 
Comprehensive Examinations: Master's Degrees 

Comprehensive examinations are required for all master's degrees. 

The test will be prepared by the student's graduate advisory committee; it will cover the area of the 
major field. As a general rule, the comprehensive examination will be written. 

The School of Music master's comprehensive examinations are offered each semester at the same 
time: 

Fall: the first full week in November 

Spring: the first full week in April 

Summer: the three successive Saturdays following July 4 

Exact dates and times are determined by the graduate adviser and are publicized as soon as possible. 
Students must register for the exam two months (minimum) prior to taking the exam bv calling 
(601)266-6458. 

The graduate coordinator must receive results of the comprehensive examination in time to notify 
the director of Graduate Studies Office no later than the last day for presenting signed theses to the 
director of Graduate Studies Office. 

A student who fails the comprehensive examination may repeat the exam once; the test must be 
repeated within one year of the first comprehensive examination. 

Advisory committee 

During the first term of full-time residence or before nine (9) hours of graduate credit have been 
earned, the student and the student's major professor select those faculty who will serve as the 
student's advisory committee. 

The major professor and the student shall develop a degree plan. In those cases where a student is 
required to take additional coursework beyond the minimum required by the degree, the advisory 
committee will counsel the student and plan the program of studies. 
This committee will submit questions for the comprehensive examination and grade it. 

The advisory committee will approve the recital repertoire, will attend the recital,* and will grade the 
performance as satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U); this grade, indicating die majority opinion of the 
advisory committee, must be recorded on the recital program and submitted to the academic adviser. 
Should a recital be judged unsatisfactory by a majority of the committee, another recital, at a date 
determined by the advisory committee, must take place. Should a recital be canceled or postponed 
until a succeeding semester, the recital will be graded "E" (course in progress). When the grade of E is 
given, the student must re-register for the course and receive a letter grade for that course. 

In degree plans that provide flexibility and in those cases where a student is required to take 
additional coursework beyond the minimum required by the degree, the advisory committee will 
counsel the student and plan the program of study. 

* Before scheduling a recital, the student must ascertain that all members of the advisory committee 
can attend. At least 14 days before die recital, the student must issue a written or emailed invitation 
to each member of his or her committee. 



College of Arts and Letters 75 



Master of Music Degree-Performance (32 hours) 

Candidacy Audition 

All students must audition for an appropriate faculty jury. Unless stipulated otherwise (i.e., Brass 
Performance, Percussion Performance, Piano Performance, Voice Performance), an audition tape 
will suffice. This audition must be deemed satisfactory before one can be declared a candidate 
for the master's degree (i.e., before one completes nine (9) hours of graduate work; see Degree 
Candidacy). Early auditions are encouraged. At least 18 hours of coursework must be at the 600 
level or higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Repertory lists with representative works are available upon request. Write: [Name of Instrument] 
Professor, School of Music, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive #5081, 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001. 

String and Woodwind Performance: For those majoring in string and woodwind perforance, the 
audition must be at least 30 minutes in length and must include three works of contrasting style, 
preferably representing three different periods in music. 

Brass Performance: For those majoring in brass performance a tape will not suffice; the candidacy 
audition must be a full recital for the Southern Miss brass faculty. 

Percussion Performance: For those majoring in percussion performance, the candidacy audition 
may be on cassette; the applicant should demonstrate proficiency on timpani and mallet keyboards 
and should include a multiple-percussion performance. 

Piano Performance: For those majoring in piano performance, the audition must be memorized, 
be at least 30 minutes in length, and be performed before the piano faculty; it must include works 
from at least three different periods in music (e.g., Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionist, or 
Contemporary)- 

Voice Performance: An audition cassette will satisfy preliminary expectations, but before 
completing nine (9) hours of graduate work, the student must also sing for a faculty committee and 
fulfill the requirements below. 

Voice performance majors must demonstrate, by audition (1) advanced vocal technique; (2) good 
diction in Italian, French, German, and English; and (3) good vocal quality and musicianship. The 
repertoire must be memorized and include (1) an aria from opera or oratorio; (2) a 17th- or 18th- 
century Italian song or aria; (3) a German Lied; (4) a French Melodie; and (5) a song in English. 

Further, the student's transcript(s) must show grades of C or better in two years of foreign language 
(any combination of two of the following: German, French, and Italian) and at least one course in 
diction for singers. Students lacking these will be required to pass these courses in addition to the 
requirements for the degree. In lieu of coursework, satisfactory performance on language exams, 
administered by the Southern Miss Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, is acceptable. 

Specific areas in which this degree may be earned are: 

Bassoon Oboe Tuba 

Clarinet Percussion Viola 

Euphonium Piano Accompanying Violin 

Flute Saxophone Violoncello 

Guitar String Bass Voice 

Harpsichord Trombone 

Horn Trumpet 



law 






Music History and Literature Electives 6 

(Mus 630 History Survey (3) may be required) 
Music Theoiy Electives 6 

(MUS 620 Theory Survey (3) may be required) 
Literature (primary performance medium) 2 

MUS 692, or MUS 546 (instrumental) or MUS 540 or 541 (vocal) 
Pedagogy (primary performance medium). -. 2 

MED 692, or MED 550 (vocal) 

Applied Music (primary performance medium) 8 

MUS 715 Recital 3 

Electives* 5 

*May be in appropriate related fields. 



76 j College of Arts and Letters 



Master of Music Degree-Performance-Piano Accompanying 
(32 hours) 

Candidacy Audition: 

Perform two contrasting selections from the standard piano repertoire. Additionally, present three 
chamber works representing three different periods in music; single movements are acceptable. One 
of these movements must be with at least three instruments including piano. The remaining two 
works should include a sonata with an instrument and piano and a work with voice and piano. The 
audition may be on videotape (VHS) or cassette recording. At least 18 hours of coursework must be 
at the 600 level or higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

MUS 540 or MUS 541 Vocal Literature 2 

MED 550 Vocal Pedagogy 2 

*MUS 539 Diction (French, German, or Italian) 6 

MUS 531 History of Opera 3 

MUS 551 Chamber Music 3 

Music Theory Electives (MUS 620 Theory Survey may be required) 6 

Applied Music 8 

Electives (MUS 630 History Survey (3) may be required) 2 

Special Requirement: Accompany at least four full recitals; at least one must involve piano and 
two or more instruments. Students must register for MUS 797, Independent Study (1 credit hour 
minimum) the semester these accompanying requirements are met. This course, MUS 797, does not 
apply towards the degree. 

* Appropriate substitutes: GER 505 and FRE 505. 

Master of Music Degree-Conducting (35 Hours) 

Candidacy Audition 

Demonstrate advanced conducting competency by directing an audition rehearsal with a university 
performing ensemble. Play a full band or orchestral score at the keyboard. (Request audition 
repertory list by writing to the band, choir, or orchestra office.) 

Three year's experience as a conductor and considerable experience as a member of a performing 
ensemble are expected. Students are encouraged to submit a videotape of their conducting. 

In some cases, students with minimal deficiencies will be admitted into the program on a 
conditional basis and will be required to complete undergraduate courses (not for graduate credit) 
before proceeding as a degree candidate. At least 18 hours of coursework must be at the 600 level or 
higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

MUS 548 or Choral Literature I (3) 

or 
MED 538 Band Literature I (3) 3 

MUS 549 Choral Literature II 

or 

MUS 550 Symphonic Literature 3 

MED 731 Graduate Conducting 1 3 

MED 732 Graduate Conducting II 3 

Conducting Elective (individual study with conductor of major ensemble) 3 

MUS 721 Analytical Techniques I 

or 

MUS 722 Analytical Techniques II 3 

MUS 723 20th Century Compositional Techniques 3 

MUS 731 Performance Practices 1 3 

MUS 732 Performance Practices II 3 

Music History and Literature (MUS 630 History Survey may be required) 3 

MUS 692 Special Problems in Scoring/ Arranging (individual study with conductor) 3 

Applied Music : : : 2-3 

NOTE: Knowledge of musical terms in French, Italian, and German must be demonstrated. 
Candidate must prepare and conduct at least one concert with a major performing organization. 



College of Arts and Letters || 77 

Master of Music Degree-Music History and Literature (34 Hours) 

Undergraduate Prerequisites 

Baccalaureate degree with a major in music and at least one course in each of the following: 
counterpoint, orchestration. 

Special Examination 

Demonstrate for the music history faculty the ability to translate excerpts in at least one foreign 
language (i.e., French, German, Italian, or Spanish) before completing nine (9) hours of graduate 
coursework. Prior to the first registration, demonstrate writing ability by submitting a research 
paper, preferably in music. At least 18 hours of coursework must be at the 600 level or higher. A 3.0 
GPA is required for graduation. 

MUS 702 Bibliography for Music Research 3 

MUS 698 Thesis 6 

MUP 685 Collegium Musicum 2 

Select 9 hours from: 9 

MUS 533 20th Century Music (3) 

MUS 534 Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance Music (3) 

MUS 535 Baroque Music (3) 

MUS 536 18th Century Music (3) 

MUS 537 19th Century Music (3) 

MUS 571 Seminar in Masterpieces of Music (3) 

Select 6 hours from: 6 

MUS 721 Analytical Techniques I 

or 
MUS 722 Analytical Techniques II 

or 
MUS 723 Seminal - in 20th Centuiy Compositional Techniques 

Select 6 hours, any MUS prefix course 6 

Select 2 hours, any MUP prefix course 2 

Research courses: In addition to requirements above, the major professor and the advisory 
committee may specify that the student pass REF 601, Educational Research (3). 

Master of Music Degree-Theory and Composition (32 Hours) 

Undergraduate Prerequisite 

Completion of a bachelor's degree that included counterpoint and orchestration. 

Candidacy Audition 

Take and pass a keyboard skills examination by performing selections from R. Schumann, Album 
for the Young, Op. 68, and J. S. Bach, 371 Four-Part Chorales. Submit, prior to the first registration, 
the score (and tape, if available) of a three-movement sonata, 10 to 15 minutes in length, for one or 
more instruments. One may send additional scores. At least 18 hours of coursework must be at the 
600 level or higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Advanced Composition 6 

MUS 711 Pedagogy of Theory 3 

Analytical Techniques 6 

MUS 721 Analytical Techniques I (3) or 
MUS 722 Analytical Techniques II (3) or 
MUS 723 Analytical Techniques III (3) 

Applied Music 3 

Music History and Literature Electives (MUS 630, History Survey (3) may be required) 6 

MUS 698 Thesis 
or 

MUS 714 Composition Project 6 

Electives (Cannot be MUS 620, Theory Survey) 2 

NOTE: Contact the coordinator of Graduate Studies for details on an emphasis in theory or 
composition. 



78 j; College of Arts and Letters 



Master of Music Degree-Woodwind Performance and 
Pedagogy (32 Hours) 

Candidacy Audition 

Audition for the appropriate jury (tapes are acceptable), showing performance ability on at least two 
woodwind instruments: flute, oboe, clarinet, saxophone, bassoon. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Primary Woodwind Instrument 6 

Secondary Woodwind Instrument 4 

Three Remaining Woodwind Instruments 6 

MUS 715 Recital (two recitals) 2 

MED 734 Woodwind Techniques and Materials 2 

MUS 692 Special Problems: Woodwind Literature 2 

Music History and Literature Elective (MUS 630, History Survey (3) may be required) 3 

Music Theory Elective (MUS 620, Theory Survey (3) maybe required) 3 

Electives (3 hours must be at 600 level or higher) 4 

NOTE: Selection of specific primary, secondary, and minor instruments is at the option of the 
student in consultation with his or her graduate advisory committee and with approval of the 
auditioning committee. Normally, the student will be expected to select a primary/secondary 
combination from one of the following: single reed/double reed, single reed/flute, double reed/flute. 
Study of the primary and secondary instruments must embrace at least two semesters. Requirements 
for MUS 715 under this degree program will include two recitals, each receiving one semester 
hour credit. These recitals may consist of one chamber music program and one solo program, or a 
combination of chamber and solo music within both recitals. The primary and secondary instruments 
must be performed in each recital; the remaining instruments must be performed at least once, with 
a minimum of one minor instrument represented on each program. 

Master of Music Education Degree (30 Hours) 

Undergraduate prerequisite 

Completion of a bachelor's degree in music education at The University of Southern Mississippi or an 
equivalent program that included student teaching and state licensure. At least 18 hours of coursework 
must be at the 600 level or higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. The master of music education 
degree can be earned in two summers (12 hours each) plus two transfer classes (six hours). 

The Masters in Music Education may also be earned through the online Master of Music Education. 
This degree emphasis area is intended for professionals, active in the field who are unable to attend 
traditional classes at the Hattiesburg campus. The distance learning degree is an alternative to the 
traditional on-campus Master of Music Education degree program in that it allows teachers to 
participate in professionla development and meet the state certification and re-certification requirements 
with the least amount of disruption to their teaching schedule. 

For the distance learning offereings, course work is accessed online or in a combination of online 
and short residency programs hosted at a number of locations in Mississippi, the nation, and Western 
Europe. The curriculum is designed to be flexible and relevant to the needs of each participant. Through 
this program of study, teachers develop research and writing skills as well as aquire new methods and 
materials for the teaching environment. The degree can be completed "at a distance" except for on- 
campus visits for entrance exams and orientation, comprehensive exam, one and two week intensive 
residency courses, and weekend workshops and clinics. 

REF 601 Research: Introduction and Methodology 3 

REF 607 Curriculum Development 3 

MED 725 Foundations and Principles of Music Education 3 

Music Theory Elective (MUS 620 Theory Survey (3) may be required) 3 

Music History Elective (MUS 630 History Survey (3) may be required) 3 

Ensemble... 2 

Electives, 11 of which must be in Music Education 13 



College of Arts and Letters [ 79 



Master of Music Education Degree, Emphasis - Seeking 
Licensure (51-54 Hours) 

Undergraduate prerequisite 

Completion of a bachelor's degree in music at The University of Southern Mississippi or an 
equivalent program. At least 18 hours of course work must be at the 600 level or higher. A 3.0 GPA 
is required for graduation. 

Degree Candidacy 

Admission to graduate study does not imply admission to candidacy for a master's degree. In 
addition to requirements listed to gain degree candidacy (listed elswhere in the Graduate Bulletin) 
Track II candidates must: 

1 . Successfully pass the Praxis I and Praxis IIA exams before or by the end of the 1st semester of 
study. Failure to do so will prevent further enrollment in the program. 

2. Successfully pass the Basic Technology Exam given by the education department before or by the end 
of the 1st semester. Failure to do so will prevent further enrollment in the program. 

3. If not required for the previous undergraduate degree, successfully pass a music education piano 
proficiency examination by the end of the 2nd semester of enrollment 

4. Must obtain clearance from the Office of Educational Field Experiences (OEFE) before required 
observation and practica in specified music area methods courses. 

Successful completion of degree requirements include: 

1 . Successfully passing Praxis IIB before graduating. 

2. Successful completion of student teaching seminars and two supervised teaching placements. 

a. The candidate can complete one full semester (6 credit hours) consisting of two (2) experiences. 

b. The candidate can teach on experience each over two (2) semesters (3 credit hours each) for a 
half day. 

3. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations. 

4. Applying for teacher licensure. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
wvvw.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Course Work 



REF 604 Foundations in American Education 3 

REF 632 Measuring Student Success 3 

SPE 500 The Psychology and Education of the Exceptional Individual 3 

PSY672 Social Processes in Classroom Learning 3 

REF 601 Educational Research: Interpretation and Applications 3 

REF 607 Developing a Student-Centered Cuuriculum 3 

MED 725 Foundations and Principles of Music Education 3 

Music Theory Elective (MUS 620, Theory Survey may be required) 3 

Music History Elective (MUS 630, History Survey may be required) 3 

MED 737 String Techniques and Materials 2 

MED 740 Music Education in the Elementary Schools 3 

MED 750 Music in General Education 3 

MED 731 Graduate Conducting 1 3 

MED 734 Woodwind Techniques and Materials (instrumental only) 2 

MED 735 Brass Techniques and Materials (instrumental only) 2 

MED 736 Percussion Techniques and Materials (instrumental only) 2 

MED 591 Instrumental Workshop (instrumental only) 2 

MED 548 Choral Literature I (choral only) 3 

MED 592 Choral Workshop (choral only) 2 

MED 610 Teaching and Learning Music 2 

MED 693 Student Teaching in Music Education 1 3 

MED 694 Student Teaching in Music Education II 3 



80 I College of Arts and Letters 



Doctoral Degrees 

Each student has final responsibility to ascertain that he or she has complied with all applicable 
catalogue requirements for graduation. Faculty and advisors assist students in developing their 
programs, but they cannot waive or vary degree requirements as these appear in the University 
Bulletin. Students must read the "Doctoral Degree Requirements" section of this Bulletin; 
that which follows pertains to School of Music practices and policies and it amplifies Bulletin 
statements. 

Two doctoral degrees are available in the School of Music: the doctor of philosophy in music 
education, and the doctor of musical arts. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

gSpf Students pursuing the doctor of musical arts degree do so with an emphasis in performance and 

1 pedagogy. Specific areas in which the DMA may be earned are: 
f||3l||i Bassoon Horn Tuba 

Cm Clarinet Oboe Viola 

ppl|^| Composition Percussion Violin 

Sllllfl Conducting Piano Violoncello 

IplPl Euphonium Saxophone Voice 

1|S>| Flute String Bass 

|||j||l Guitar Trombone 

Harpsichord Trumpet 

Admission Requirements: Doctoral Degrees 

In addition to acceptable grades (see general admission requirements) and GRE scores, successful 
applicants to the doctoral program must have an appropriate baccalaureate or master's degree 
with a major in music, an acceptable candidacy audition (for DMA degrees), strong letters of 
recommendation, and successful personal interviews. Letters of recommendation should be 
from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent 
to the School of Music. Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to 
apply. Acceptance to the School of Music requires students to meet expectations beyond these 
requirements; see "Degree Candidacy." 

Students who are unable to meet regular admissions standards may be considered for conditional 
admission. (For details concerning conditional admission, see "Admission Requirements and 
Procedures" in this Bulletin) Please note: The Graduate Record Examination is required for both 
conditional and regular admission. 

Important Note: Acceptance into the doctoral degree programs of the School of Music requires that 
students meet expectations beyond those stipulated in the Bulletin; see "Acceptance into the School 
of Music," in this Bulletin. 

Ensemble Participation: Doctoral Degrees 

All full-time doctoral students majoring in music or music education are required to participate in a 
major ensemble during their first four terms of residence. A maximum of two (2) hours of graduate 
credit earned from ensemble work may be counted toward a degree. The ensemble in which 
one participates will be determined by the student's major applied area and area of interest. The 
following are considered to be appropriate major ensembles to fulfill this requirement: Orchestra, 
Band, Southern Chorale, Jazz Lab Band, Hattiesburg Choral Union, University Singers, and 
Opera/Music Theatre. Exceptions may be granted to doctoral students in residence during summer 
semesters. 

For doctoral students whose major instrument is piano, the following would constitute ensemble 
participation: performing as a pianist with the Orchestra, Band, Southern Chorale, Jazz Lab Band, 
Hattiesburg Choral Union, University Singers, Opera/Music Theatre, Chamber Music, Collegium 
Musicum, or other appropriate major ensemble. Studio accompanying may fulfill the ensemble 
requirement if approved by the piano faculty. (These students should register for their own studio 
teacher's section of MUS 792, Special Problems.) 

Doctoral Exception: On rare occasions a doctoral student may be excused from ensemble 
participation for one semester of residence if there is a bona fide academic reason for such. This 
ensemble participation waiver must be requested in writing and approved by the student's advisory 
committee. 



College of Arts and Letters 81 



Acceptance into the School of Music: Doctoral Degrees 

Acceptance: Admission to graduate study does not imply acceptance into the School of Music for 
doctoral-level study. A maximum of nine (9) hours of graduate work earned before one has gained 
admission to the School of Music can be applied towards a degree. To gain acceptance, one must: 

a) Performance and Pedagogy: possess a master's degree: Music Education: possess a master's degree 
in music with state licensure and at least three years of successful teaching experience (K-12); 

b) take diagnostic entrance examinations the Friday before school begins, 

c) pass a candidacy audition (DMA in performance and pedagogy, applied areas only) prior to or 
during the first term of full-time residence or before completing nine (9) hours of course work, 

d) pass a candidacy audition (DMA in performance and pedagogy, conducting area only) prior to the 
first term of enrollment; 

e) submit and gain approval for a portfolio of one's representative scores or recordings prior to the 
first term of enrollment (DMA in performance and pedagogy, composition area only); 

f) pass all entrance examinations, DMA special examinations (see specific areas in which the DMA 
may be earned); 

g) consult with the academic adviser, have a major professor and an advisory committee appointed, 
and begin planning the total degree program early in the first term of attendance or before nine (9) 
semester hours have been earned; 

h) complete at least nine (9) hours of graduate course work relevant to one's degree plan with a 

cumulative grade-point average of 3.5; 
i) by the end of the second semester, all doctoral students must complete a Degree Planning Sheet, 

approved by the advisory committee (Doctoral students should be counseled by their advisory 

committee before registering for courses), pass qualifying exams. 



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Diagnostic Entrance Examinations: Doctoral Degrees 

All entering doctoral students are required to take a Diagnostic Entrance Examination consisting of 
three parts: music theory, music history, and expository writing. The purposes of this examination 
are (1) to determine if the student has foundation-level deficiencies that need to be addressed in 
order for him/her to be successful in doctoral-level courses, on the qualifying examinations and on 
the comprehensive examinations; and (2) to provide information that will guide the student and his/ 
her adviser in selecting useful and appropriate academic courses. 

Students who fail either or both of the theory and history sections of the diagnostic examination will 
be required to enroll in the appropriate review courses (MUS 620 and/or MUS 630) during their first 
semester of full-time study. Exceptions to this requirement may be granted for the spring semester 
only and will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Students are required to earn a grade of "B" or 
better in that/those course(s). Students who fail either the theory or history sections (or both) and 
intend to pursue graduate study part time must complete the appropriate review course(s) before 
completing 12 credit hours. In some instances a student may be required to enroll in one or more 
appropriate undergraduate courses. Credits earned in these courses (both the review courses and any 
required undergraduate course) are not counted toward the doctoral degree. 

Students who do not pass the expository writing section of the diagnostic examination may be 
advised to take an appropriate writing course in the English department and will be required to take 
MUS 500 ("Writing about Music"), even if it is not one of their degree requirements. 

All diagnostic examination results will be sent to the graduate advisor so that the graduate advisor 
and the student can plan an initial program of study. This program of study may be amended after 
the student's advisory committee is appointed or upon completion of the qualifying examination. 

The diagnostic entrance examinations are administered on campus each Friday preceding the first 
day of classes in fall, spring, and summer. 



9 a.m. 

10:30a.m. 

1-5 p.m. 

These examinations are also administered through the mail. To make the testing process feasible, 
a proctor, preferably a teacher in a nearby college or university, may administer the examination. 
Submit the name and address of die proctor to the coordinator of graduate studies. 



Theory 

Music History and Literature and Expository Writing 
• Advisement/Registration/Fee Payment 



82 I College of Arts and Letters 





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Qualifying Examinations: Doctoral Degrees 

All doctoral students are required to complete a qualifying examination consisting of three written 
components (music theory, music history, and the student's major area). This examination must 
be completed at the end of the second semester of full-time doctoral study. Part-time students 
must complete this examination at the end of the third semester of enrollment. The purpose of the 
qualifying examination is to determine if, after a year of doctoral coursework (which may include 
review courses) and of independent study, the student is academically qualified to proceed with 
doctoral study. In order to be successful on the written portions of this examination, the student 
must be able to think critically and be able to synthesize material from a variety of sources. Sample 
examinations may be available to students in some areas. Doctoral students should consult their 
major professor and the coordinator of graduate studies regarding examination policies beyond 
those listed in the Bulletin. 

The emphasis area portion of the qualifying examination (e.g., music education, conducting, music 
performance, etc.) will be graded initially by those members of the student's committee representing 
the emphasis area. The music theory and history portions will be graded initially by theory and 
history faculty, respectively. A student will be awarded a pass if at least four of the five members of 
the committee vote accordingly 

A student who fails any part of the qualifying examination may, with the permission of his or her 
committee, repeat it. However, any coursework (in the area of the exam which the student failed) 
enrolled in after that initial failure and before the qualifying examination is passed in its entirety 
will be considered to be remedial and will not count as doctoral coursework. 

For example, if a student should fail all sections of the qualifying examination in November, the 
courses taken during the fall semester will count toward the degree. However, courses taken during 
the following spring semester would not, even if the student passes the qualifying examination 
before the end of that spring semester (i.e., in April). As well, if a student should fail one portion 
(e.g., theory) of the qualifying examination in November, the courses taken in said area during the 
fall will count toward the degree. However, courses in said area taken during the following spring 
semester would not, even if the student passes the qualifying examination in that area before the end 
of that spring semester (i.e., in April). After an initial failure (in whole or part), if permission for a 
retake is granted, the qualifying examination must be retaken at the end of the next regular semester 
of full-time enrollment, but not later than two semesters after the failure (including the summer 
semester). 

The School of Music doctoral qualifying examinations are offered each semester at the same time: 

Fall: the first full week in November 

Spring: the first full week in April 

Summer: the three successive Saturdays following July 4 

Exact dates and times are determined by the graduate adviser and are publicized as soon as possible. 
Students must register for the exam two months (minimum) prior to taking the exam by 
calling (601) 266-5543. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Jury Requirements/Final Examinations: Doctoral Degrees 

Students who are enrolled in MUP private lessons in their principal applied area and who are 
seeking the doctor of musical arts degree with emphasis in performance must perform a jury for 
the appropriate applied faculty. All other doctoral students enrolled in MUP private lessons must 
perform a final examination for the applied teacher. At the finish of each semester and summer term, 
the applied teacher must complete a Final Jury/Examination Form for each student and file it with 
the academic adviser. Students enrolled in applied music who do not take a final examination or 
perform for a jury will receive the grade "I" or "F." All grades of "I" must be completed by the end 
of the next semester (excluding summer term). See Grading System in this Bulletin. 

The applied teacher must record and submit any exception to this policy to the coordinator of 
graduate studies; signatures of all appropriate area faculty must be included on this form. 



College of Arts and Letters 83 



Comprehensive Examinations: Doctoral Degrees 

At the completion of all coursework and other required examinations, the doctoral student is required 
to successfully complete a written comprehensive examination in the student's area of specialization, 
music theory, and music history. The examination in the student's area of specialization will be 
prepared and graded by the student's committee members from that area. The examinations in music 
theory and history will be prepared and graded by the appropriate area faculty. The candidate's 
committee members representing music history and theory will deliver the recommendation of each 
of those areas to the full committee. The full committee will meet to discuss the examination and 
recommend a grade of "pass" or "fail" for each area (specialization, music theory, music history). 
This meeting will be held during (or before) the week of final examinations for the fall and spring 
semesters. In those instances where the comprehensive examination is taken during the summer 
semester, this meeting will be held within the first three weeks of the fall semester. In any case, 
the graduate coordinator must receive results of the comprehensive examination in time to notify 
the director of the Graduate Studies Office no later than the printed deadline (See page 33 in the 
Bulletin for deadlines). 

When it is determined that the comprehensive examination is unsatisfactory, in whole or in part, the 
student may be granted a second examination. The examination must be retaken within one year of 
the first, and the student will be required to repeat only those sections of the examination judged 
to be unsatisfactory. It is strongly recommended that the student confer with his/her committee 
members and other appropriate area faculty for suggestions or assistance in preparation for this 
repeat examination. If the second examination is determined to be unsatisfactory, in whole or in 
part, the student cannot earn a doctoral degree in music or music education at The University of 
Southern Mississippi. 

The purpose of this comprehensive examination is to evaluate the student's ability to analyze 
and synthesize material from a variety of sources and to communicate that knowledge in written 
form. Success in coursework does not guarantee success on the comprehensive examination. Most 
students will need to undertake a serious program of independent study and preparation in addition 
to any or all required coursework in order to complete the comprehensive examination successfully. 
Doctoral students should consult their major professor and the graduate coordinator regarding 
examination policies beyond those listed in the Bulletin. 

The School of Music doctoral comprehensive examinations are offered each semester at the same time: 

Fall: the first full week in November 

Spring: the first full week in April 

Summer: the three successive Saturdays following July 4 

Exact dates and times are determined by the graduate adviser and are publicized as soon as possible. 
Students must register ("or the exam two months (minimum) prior to taking the exam bv 
calling (601) 266-6458. 

Oral Defense: Doctoral Degrees 

After the dissertation has been accepted and after all required coursework has been completed, but at 
least seven weeks before the candidate is scheduled to receive the degree, a final oral defense of the 
dissertation and related fields will be conducted by the student's advisory committee and any other 
faculty members designated by the director of the Gradaute Studies Office. The examination will be 
open to any member of the graduate faculty. 

Advisory Committee: Doctoral Degrees 

Early in the first term of full-time residency or before nine (9) hours of graduate credit have been 
earned, the student, and the student's major professor select those faculty who will serve as the 
student's advisory committee. The advisory committee must be appointed before one takes the 
qualifying examination. 

The major professor and the student shall develop a planning sheet of coursework based upon 
qualifying examination information together with course requirements. In those cases where a 
student is required to take additional coursework beyond the minimum required by the degree, the 
advisory committee will counsel the student and plan the program of studies. 

Recital Requirements: 

The student must ascertain that all members of the advisory committee can attend before scheduling 
a recital* At least 14 days before the recital, the student must remind the members of the committee 
by issuing a written or emailed invitation to each. Doctoral recitals shall not be scheduled to occur 
during the week of final examinations. 



84 !j College of Arts and Letters 



If recitals are required by the student's degree plan, the advisor}' committee must: 

1) Approve the repertoire, attend the recital, and grade the performance as "satisfactory" (S) or 
"unsatisfactory" (U). 

2) This grade, indicating the majority opinion of the advisory committee, must be recorded on the 
Graduate Examination Report and submitted to the academic adviser. 

3) Should a recital be canceled or postponed until a succeeding semester, the recital wall be graded "E" 
(course in progress). When the grade of "E" is given, the student must re-register for the course 
and receive a letter grade for that course. 

4) Should a recital be judged "unsatisfactory", another recital, at a date determined by the advisory 
committee, must take place. 

5) A student who receives two grades of "unsatisfactory" in meeting degree recital requirements wall 
fllPS not be allowed to continue as a candidate. 



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*When all members of a committee cannot attend a conducting degree recital, the concert will be 
videotaped for the member(s) unable to attend. 

Dissertation 

A. The dissertation topic must be approved by the student's major professor and advisory committee 
and must be an original and significant contribution to knowledge in the chosen field. The Human 
Subjects Protection Review Committee must also approve the topic, if applicable. 

B. Once a topic has been approved, the student must enroll in MUS 797, MED 797, MUS 898, or 
MED 898 in each semester/term until the degree is completed. 

C. A separate publication outlining university requirements concerning the preparation of dissertations 
is available in the Office of Graduate Studies. 

D. Additionally, instructions specific to the development of an approved topic in Music (see required 
pamphlet "Prospectus Guide for the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree") or Music Education must be 
followed. These may be obtained from the graduate adviser. 

Documents 

The doctoral student must be sure that a number of documents are filed with the Graduate Studies 
Office. Please see "Documents-Doctoral Degree Requirements," this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Degree Plans 

Doctor of Musical Arts Degree 

Performance and Pedagogy (all areas except Conducting and 
Composition) 

Candidacy Audition* 

All students must audition for the appropriate area faculty (generally, taped auditions are not 
acceptable.) This audition must be deemed "satisfactory" before one can be accepted into the School 
of Music (i.e., before completing nine (9) hours of graduate work). Early auditions are encouraged, 
and a high level of performance proficiency is expected. 

*In lieu of a candidacy audition, with the approval of the School of Music Graduate Committee, 
students who will complete the master of music degree in performance at Southern Miss may use 
their graduate recital. The appropriate faculty must attend the recital, and the printed program 
must state the total purpose of the concert, (e.g., "This recital is given in partial fulfillment of the 
requirements for the degree master of music in performance, and it also serves as an audition for 
acceptance into the doctor of musical arts curriculum in the School of Music") The student must 
begin doctoral study within one year of this audition. 

Repertory lists with representative works are available upon request. Write: [instrument] professor, School 
of Music, The University of Southern Mississippi, 118 College Drive #5081, Hattiesburg, MS 39406- 
0001. 

String and Woodwind Performance: For those majoring in string and woodwind performance, 
the audition must be at least 30 minutes in length and must include three works of contrasting style, 
preferably representing three different periods in music. 



College of Arts and Letters 85 



Brass Performance: For those majoring in brass performance, the candidacy audition must be a full 
recital for the Southern Miss brass faculty. 

Percussion Performance: For those majoring in percussion performance, the applicant should 
demonstrate proficiency on timpani, on mallet keyboards, and should perform a multiple- percussion 
performance. 

Piano Performance: For those majoring in piano performance, the audition must be a full recital, 
memorized, performed before the piano faculty; it must include works from at least three different 
periods in music (e.g., Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Impressionist, Contemporary)- The faculty 
may select portions from the repertoire submitted. 

Voice Performance: Voice performance majors must demonstrate, by audition, (1) advanced vocal 
technique; (2) good diction in Italian, French, German, and English; and (3) good vocal quality and 
musicianship. The repertoire must be memorized and include (1) an aria from opera or oratorio; (2) 
a 17th- or 18th-century Italian song or aria; (3) a German Lied; (4) a French Melodie; and (5) a song 
in English. 

Special requirement, Voice Performance: The student's transcript(s) must show grades of C or 
better in at least one course in diction for singers and in two years of foreign language, German, 
French, or Italian (may include any combination of those languages). Students lacking these will be 
required to pass such courses in addition to the requirements for the degree. In lieu of coursework, 
satisfactory performance on language exams, administered by the Southern Miss Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, is acceptable. 



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All D.M.A. Areas Except Conducting and Composition 

The DMA student will be required to take MUS 500, 702, 731, 732, and 898. The remainder of the 
coursework will be determined in light of the student's qualifying examination, entrance audition, 
his or her interests or professional goals, and the counsel of the major professor and graduate 
advisor}' committee. In planning this program, the following minimum distribution of graduate 
courses (including master's degree work) is required: thirty (30) semester hours in performance, 
music studio study and recitals, nine (9) semester hours in music history (survey courses and MUS 
571), three (3) semester hours in music literature (MUS 531 and courses with the word "literature" 
in the title), nine (9) semester hours in music theory, and the remainder of the program in approved 
electives which may include six (6) semester hours in a cognate field of study. A 3.0 GPA is required 
for graduation. Three recitals will be required in addition to the entrance audition. One must be a 
solo recital, one a lecture recital, and the third chosen from the following options: (a) performance 
of a concerto with orchestra, (b) performance of a major role in an opera, (c) performance of a major 
role in an oratorio, (d) a full-length recital of chamber music, or (e) a second solo recital. (Note: To 
use options "a" through "d," permission of the student's advisory committee must be received 
before the semester in which the event will occur.) As a general rule, not more than one doctoral 
recital may be presented by a candidate during any academic term, nor more than two during any 
nine-month period. Rare exceptions will be permitted, but under rigidly controlled procedures. See 
the graduate adviser for details. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 
Research Tools 

One language will be required in the degree. (For specifics, see General Degree Requirements, 
Foreign Language, in this Bulletin.) Others may be required by the major professor and graduate 
advisory committee. 

The D.M.A. dissertation, required for completion of the degree, consists of two parts. Part I must be 
a written thesis giving evidence of the candidate's ability to make a scholarly investigation of limited 
scope. Part II must include all recital programs, concert programs, and program notes presented 
during the student's residency. D.M.A. students, performance and pedagogy (all areas except 
Conducting and Composition) may choose an alternative to die traditional dissertation requirement. 
This "Track 2" option is only available with the major professor's and advisory committee's approval. 
See die graduate adviser for further information. 



86 | College of Arts and Letters 



Conducting Area 

Acceptance of a prospective student into the DMA. program in the conducting area requires a 

previously earned master's degree in music or music education. The conducting faculty must 

be satisfied that the student is qualified to pursue the D.M.A. at The University of Southern 

Mississippi. 

Students applying for entrance into the D.M.A. program in the conducting area must: 

a) provide an application that includes a current resume; a repertoire list specifying works conducted 
in performance; three letters of recommendation which center on the applicant's conducting 
abilities; a videotape of a rehearsal conducted by the applicant; and a video or audio tape of a 
performance conducted by the applicant. 

b) complete an interview and an audition. After review of the application by the conducting faculty, 
the applicant may be invited to an interview-audition on campus. It will include 1) a session with 
the conducting faculty to assess one's musical proficiencies and 2) a rehearsal of an appropriate 
university ensemble to assess one's rehearsal technique. 

In the interview, the applicant will demonstrate the following: 

a) musical ity, preferably by showing proficiency as a performer on a standard orchestral or band 
instrument, on a standard keyboard instrument, or as a singer 

b) keyboard proficiency above the basic level in technique, musicianship, and open-score reading; 

c) a high degree of competence in ear-training and sight-singing 

d) thorough knowledge of the traditional orchestral and band instruments and their transpositions; 

e) acquaintance with a broad range of appropriate repertoire from various periods 

f) detailed knowledge of works from the applicant's repertoire list 

The audition, a rehearsal, will use repertoire selected in consultation with the appropriate faculty and 
will last for approximately 30 minutes. The applicant's competence in effective gestural and verbal 
communication will be assessed. For applicants admitted to the program with deficiencies in any of 
the above, no degree credit will be granted for any required remedial work. 

The D.M A. student will be required to take either MUS 500 or MED 825. Also required are MUS 702, 73 1, 
732, and 898; MED 731, 732, 733; MUP 896 and 897. The remainder of the coursework will be determined 
in light of the student's qualifying examination, entrance interview-audition, interests or professional goals, 
and the counsel of the major professor and graduate advisory committee. In planning this program, the 
following minimum distribution of graduate courses (including master's degree work) is required, thirty 
(30) semester hours in performance, conducting, and recitals, nine (9) semester hours in music history 
(survey courses and MUS 571), three (3) semester hours in music literature (MUS 531 and courses 
witii the word "literature" in the title), nine (9) semester hours in music tiieory, and six (6) hours of 
approved electives which may include a cognate field of study (a course in foundations of music education 
is recommended). 

Recitals: Two concerts and a lecture recital will be required. Repertoire for these concerts must 
be approved in advance by the student's advisory committee. When practical, the repertoire will 
include works for both vocal and instrumental components. As a general rule, not more than one 
doctoral concert/recital may be presented by a candidate during any semester nor more than two 
during any nine-month period. Rare exceptions will be permitted, but only under rigidly controlled 
procedures. See your advisory committee for details. 

Satisfactory competence in English and German, French, or Italian is required for candidacy. 
Competence in a foreign language can be demonstrated by: 

a) completing three semesters of an undergraduate-level language course with a grade of B or higher: 

b) completing two semesters of a graduate-level course in German or French in reading for research 
with a grade of C or higher. 

Note: Credit for graduate courses in foreign languages will not be counted toward the degree. 

The DMA. dissertation, required for completion of the degree, consists of two parts. Part I must 
be a written thesis that is an original and significant contribution to the knowledge of the field; it 
must give evidence of the candidate's ability to make a scholarly investigation of limited scope. 
Part II must include all recital programs, concert programs, and program notes presented during the 
student's residency. 



College of Arts and Letters 87 



Composition Area 

Acceptance of a prospective student into the D.MA. program in the composition area assumes a 
previously earned master's degree in composition or the equivalent, provided the composition faculty 
is satisfied that the student is qualified to pursue the D.MA. at The University of Southern Mississippi. 
A high level of proficiency in composition and extensive knowledge of literature are expected. 

Students applying for entrance into the D.MA. program in the composition area must submit a 
portfolio containing representative scores or recordings of dieir compositions prior to the first term 
of enrollment at The University of Southern Mississippi. 

The D.M.A. student will be required to take MUS 500, 702, 731, 732, and 898. The remainder of the 
program will be determined in the light of the student's portfolio evaluation, his or her qualifying 
examination, his or her interests or professional goals, and the counsel of the major professor and 
graduate advisory committee. In planning this program, the following minimum distribution of 
graduate courses (including master's degree work) is required. Thirty-nine (39) semester hours in 
composition and music theory, nine (9) semester hours in music history (survey courses and MUS 
571), three (3) semester hours in music literature (MUS 531 and courses with the word "literature" 
in the title), six (6) semester hours in a related field of study, and the remainder of the program in 
approved electives. 

The student will write compositions totaling at least two (2) hours performing time. Up to thirty 
(30) minutes of previously written compositions may be accepted as part of these two hours. 
Compositions will be for orchestra, band, chorus, ensembles, and soloists demonstrating competence 
in writing for all orchestral and band instruments as well as for the solo voice. The music should 
encompass levels of difficulty from junior high school to professional standards. The composer will 
write commentaries for each work, including program notes and rehearsal suggestions. All works, 
including parts, must be in duplicative format. 

One recital of the composer's works will be given, with the composer commenting on each 
composition. 

One language will be required, chosen from French, German, or Italian. 

The D.MA. dissertation, required for completion of the degree, will consist of the commentaries, 
program notes, and a full score of a work composed during the student's doctoral study. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education Degree 

General requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy are found in another section of this Bulletin. The 
College of Arts and Letters further stipulates the following requirements. 

Admission: See "Admission Requirements"and "Acceptance," a, b, e, f, g, and h (in this Bulletin). 
One must possess a master's degree in music with state licensure and at least three years of 
successful teaching experience (K-12). 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Research Tools: Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in music education must comply 
with the language requirements as specified in the School of Music Doctoral Handbook. Further 
research tools for Ph.D. candidates will be determined by the candidate's advisory committee. 

Degree Requirements 

The following courses are required: REF 601 (or equivalent), MUS 702 (or equivalent), MED 755, 
825, 826, and 898. The remaining coursework will be determined by the candidate's qualifying 
examination, his or her interests, and the counsel of the major professor and graduate advisory 
committee. In planning this program, the following minimum distribution of graduate courses 
(including master's degree work) is required: 

Thirty (30) semester hours in music education, nine (9) semester hours in music history and 
literature, nine (9) semester hours in music theory, nine (9) semester hours in professional 
education, three (3) semesters in studio performance study, and the remainder of the program in 
approved electives. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Although this Bulletin states that eighty- 
four (84) semester hours are required for doctoral degrees, it should be clearly understood that some 
candidates will be unable to receive a degree on the basis of this minimum. The distinction implied 
by die degree and the traditions related to it require comprehensive knowledge and demonstration 
of a high degree of proficiency in the major field and related areas of study as well as the ability to 
conduct advanced research. 



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Ij College of Arts and Letters 



Department of Philosophy and Religion 

David M. Holley, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5015 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-4518 

Bruton, Capper, Jr., DeArmey, Holley, Meyers, Rempel, Smithka, Wagner 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion offers a course of study leading to the Master of Arts 
degree with a major in Philosophy, and a graduate minor in either Philosophy or Religion. 

| Master's Degree Program 

i Requirements for Regular Admission to the Master's Program 

|eIF| In evaluating applications, the department utilizes the following criteria: (a) submission of 

life scores from the Graduate Record Examination, (b) undergraduate record, and (c) three letters 

|||e| of recommendation. Letters of recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess the 

l^lpf applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department. Generally, applicants 

have above a 3.0 on their grade point average. The department considers the trends of the grades 

and specifically the grades in philosophy. Applicants are encouraged (but not required) to submit a 

writing sample. 

In addition to the criteria for regular admission, students whose native language is not English must 
also score at least 550 on the TOEFL examination. The department presumes that applicants who 
have fulfilled these requirements possess an adequate knowledge of English. If, upon the student's 
arrival at the university, it is determined that he or she does not possess an adequate command of 
English, the department reserves the right to require appropriate remedial courses. 

Students determined to have deficiencies in their undergraduate program will be required to remedy 
the deficiencies. 

Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Requirements for Conditional Admission to the Master's Program 

In exceptional cases, students may be admitted conditionally. To remove conditional admission 
status, master's students must earn a 3.0 on the first nine (9) semester hours of coursework 
numbered 500 or above or on all coursework taken while completing this nine (9)-hour requirement. 

Curriculum Requirements 

In addition to the general admission and academic requirements for all graduate programs as set 
forth in this Bulletin, candidates for the Master of Arts degree with a major in Philosophy may 
choose either the research thesis option or the applied thesis option: 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

A. Research Thesis Option 

1 . A total of thirty (30) semester hours of credit, with at least eighteen ( 1 8) hours of that work in 
courses numbered 600 and above. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

2. A research thesis, for which die student receives six (6) hours credit toward the thirty (30) total 
required hours 

3. A comprehensive examination, normally taken after the completion of all formal coursework but 
before the thesis is officially begun is required. The comprehensive examination is intended to test 
the student's general competence in philosophy. 

4. An oral examination on the completed thesis. During the oral examination, the student will be 
expected to be able to explain and defend the ideas presented in the thesis. 

5. A reading knowledge of one foreign language 



College of Arts and Letters [: 89 



6. Optional minor: With the approval of the director of graduate studies, a student may have a minor 
(including religion), consisting of nine (9) semester hours in a (single) field which is related to 
the student's philosophical interests. Three (3) semester hours of that minor may then be counted 
toward the thirty (30) total required hours. 

B. Applied Thesis Option 

1 . A total of thirty -three (33) semester hours of credit with at least eighteen (18) hours in courses 
numbered 600 and above. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

2. An applied thesis which demonstrates the application of philosophical thought to a specific issue, 
problem or debate. The student will receive six (6) hours of credit for this applied thesis. 

3 . After satisfactory completion of the coursework, the student must take a comprehensive examination. 

4. An oral exam must be taken pn the completed applied thesis. 

5. A reading knowledge of one foreign language 

6. Optional minor: With the approval of the director of graduate studies, a student may have a minor 
(including religion), consisting of nine (9) semester hours in a (single) field which is related to the 
student's philosophical interests. Three (3) semester hours of that minor may then be counted 
toward the thirty (33) total required hours. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Department of Political Science, International 
Development, and Affairs 

Tom Lansford, Ph.D., Interim Chair 

118 College Drive #5108 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4310 

Butler, Davis, Gibson, Greene, Lansford, McBride, Naghshpour, Parker, Pauley, Press, St Marie, 

Steedman, von Herrmann, Wolfe 

Master's Degree Program 

Requirements for Regular Admission to the Master's Program 

The Department of Political Science utilizes the following criteria for evaluating applicants to the 
master's program: 

1 . The department prefers that applicants to the program have an undergraduate degree in political 
science. However, the applications of students who have an undergraduate degree in another 
discipline and who have nine or more hours of undergraduate coursework in political science with 
an average on those courses of at least 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) will be considered. 

2. The cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) from all institutions attended as well as 
die trend of grades over the course of the undergraduate degree program is considered. The 
department looks especially at the final two years of an applicant's undergraduate program An 
overall GPA of at least 3.0 during the final two years of undergraduate study is preferred. 

3. Applicants must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) before they can be admitted to 
the master's program. 

4. Applicants must submit at least two letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation should 

be from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent 
to the department. 

5. Members of underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. 

6. Applicants who do not meet the criteria for regular admission may, at the department's discretion, 
be given conditional admission to the program. The requirements for removing the conditional 
status will be stated at the time of admission. 



90 College of Arts and Letters 



Master of Arts 

Requirements for the Master of Arts degree include thirty (30) semester hours of coursework 
(21 hours of 600 level or higher), including either PS 511 or PS 512, a thesis, comprehensive 
examination, and thesis defense. The thesis committee may, at its discretion, conduct exams 
concurrently with the thesis defense. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Students must select a 
major (comprised of at least 9 hours) and a minor (comprised of at least 6 hours) from the 4 fields of 
political science. 

nmn| Master of Science 

■ j 

iKlR Requirements for the Master of Science degree include thirty-six (36) hours of coursework 
(121hours of 600 level or higher), including PS 511 and PS 512. Students must select a major 
(comprised of at least 9 hours) and a minor (comprised of at least 6 hours) from the 4 fields of 
political science. A thesis is optional. Passage of a comprehensive exam in two fields of political 
science and a 3.0 GPA are required for graduation. M.S. graduate students may select an outside 
minor of nine (9) hours which will count towards their thirty-six (36) hour total. 






■ * . | 

- I 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Dual Master's Degree in Political Science and Library and Information Science 

The Department of Political Science and the School of Library and Information Science offer a 
dual master's program leading to the Master of Arts in Political Science and the Master of Library 
and Information Science degrees. Students must be admitted separately to each program. The total 
number of hours required for both programs is 60, including 3 hours of thesis in each program - 30 
hours for the M.L.I. S. and 30 hours for the M.A. in Political Science. Students must satisfy the 
requirements of both degrees before the degrees will be awarded. 

Students in the combined program must complete the following requirements: 

Political Science 

PS 511 Research in Political Science (3 hrs) 

PS 698 Thesis (3 hrs) 

24 hours in political science, chosen in consultation with the graduate coordinator in three of the 

following areas: 

Public Administration- PS 571, 572, 573, 574, 770 

Public Law- PS 580, 581, 582, 584, 585, 588, 589, 781 

Political Theory and Methodology- PS 511, 512, 520, 521, 526, 721 

American Government and Politics- PS 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, 509, 700 

International Relations- PS 531, 532, 535, 730, 731 

Comparative Government and Politics- PS 550, 552, 556, 557, 558, 750 

Library and Information Science 

Required: 

LIS 501 Reference Resources and Services (3 hrs) 

LIS 505 Cataloging and Classification (3 hrs) 

LIS 511 Collection Development and Management (3 hrs) 

LIS 540 Information Ethics (3 hrs) 

LIS 605 Library Management (3 hrs) 

LIS 636 Infonnation: The Library and Society (3 hrs) 

LIS 651 Introduction to Information Science (3 hrs) 

LIS 691 Thesis - Research in Library Science (3 hrs) 

Electives: Two courses in LIS, 3 hours each, chosen in consultation with an academic adviser. 
Strongly recommended is at least one practicum (LIS 689, 3 hours). " ' 

Fields of Political Science 

Theory and Methods 

511,512,520,521,526,721 
American Government 

503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, 700 
Public Law and Administration 

570, 572, 574, 580, 584, 585, 589, 770, 781 
Global Politics 

531, 535, 550, 552, 554, 556, 557, 558, 559, 730, 731, 750, 751, 799 



College of Arts and Letters 91 



Comprehensive Examination 

A comprehensive examination will be given at or near the end of the coursework in two of the fields 
of political science listed above. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Doctoral Program in International Development 

Admission Requirements: 

Students will be selected for admission to the program and financial support based on the following | 
criteria: 



1 . written statement of ( 1 ) purpose for study and (2) proposed program of research 

2. master's degree in a related field with a 3.5 GPA. 

3. satisfactory scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record 
Examination 

4. three letters of reference, reflecting academic and professional endorsements, from people qualified 
to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study. Letters should be sent to the department. 

5. For non-native English speakers, a satisfactory score on the TOEFL examination (currently a 
score of 550 is typical for Southern Miss graduate programs) and a demonstration of verbal 
communication skills through an examination administered by the Southern Miss English 
Language Institute. 

Requirements for the doctor of philosophy degree include sixty-six (66) semester hours of course 
work to include twelve (12) hours of dissertation research and the thirty (30) hour common 
core, written and oral comprehensive examinations, successful completion of all research tool 
requirements, (see below), a dissertation, and a dissertation defense. A 3.0 GPA is required for 
graduation. Students must select a major (comprised of at least 12 hours) and a minor (comprised of 
at least 9 hours) field from the four fields of International Development. With department consent, 
students may select a minor field in an approved cognate. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



Required (Core) Courses: 

Hours 

IDV710 International Development Theory 3 

IDV 711 International Political Economy 3 

IDV 712 International Law and Organizations 3 

IDV 713 Globalization 3 

IDV 719 Research Desien 1 3 

IDV 721 Statistics 1 3 

IDV 725 Field Research Practice I 3 

IDV 851 Comparative International Political Development 3 

IDV 852 Comparative International Cultural Development 3 

IDV 853 Comparative International Economic Development 3 

Major Field (select courses by advisement) 15 

Minor Field (select courses by advisement) 9 

Dissertation Research 12 

Total: 66 

Fields of International Development 

Political Development 
Social and Cultural Development 
Economic Development 
Security Studies 

For course requirements in each area please consult with a faculty advisor or the graduate 
coordinator. 



ti 



i . .■'.-■■■-,--*5 



92 [ College of Arts and Letters 



Research Tool(s) 

Students satisfy research tool requirements by: 

1. completion of required course work in Statistics and Field Research with a grade of "B" or better 

2. demonstration of international competency through one of the following: oral language exam, approved 

international field experience, or by petition 

3. successful completion of professional competency experiences to include submission of a proposal for 

external funding, submission of an article or chapter for a peer-reviewed journal or book, presentation 
of a paper at a regional, national, or international professional conference appropriate to the student's 
major or minor field 

J Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Department of Speech Communication 

Charles H. Tardy, Chair 

118 College Drive #5131 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-4271 

Conville, Erikson, Hosman, Jung, Meyer, Ross, Siltanen, Tardy, Venette 

The Department of Speech Communication offers the Master of Arts, Master of Science, and the 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Communication with a speech communication emphasis. These 
degrees are offered in cooperation with the School of Mass Communication and Journalism, which 
provides an emphasis in mass communication. 

Admission 

Admission deadlines for master's and doctoral students are the same as those published by the Graduate 
School. Students seeking assistantships for the fall semester are strongly encouraged to apply prior to 
the March 1 deadline. 

Admission requirements are the same as those of the university, with the following additions: 
Applicants for the Master's Program 
Regular Admission: 

Undergraduate Record* — A cumulative GPA on the last 60 hours from all institutions of our applicants 
has ranged from 3.0 to 4.0. A 3.0 GPA is required; 3.0 GPA major is also required. 

Graduate Record Examination — Scores from the GRE must be submitted. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language — Applicants whose native language is not English must attain a 
TOEFL score of 5 50. 

Letters of Recommendation — Three current letters of recommendation that refer to the student's 
academic ability and preparation to pursue graduate study must be submitted. Normally these will be 
requested from faculty who have taught or supervised the student. The letters should be sent to the 
Department of Speech Communication. 

Conditional Admission: 

Undergraduate Record — The cumulative GPA of the last 60 hours from all institutions is usually 2.75 
or better. 

Graduate Record Examination — GRE scores must be submitted. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language — Applicants whose native language is not English must attain a 
TOEFL score of 550. 



College of Arts and Letters 93 

Letters of Recommendation — Three current letters of recommendation that refer to the student's 
academic ability and preparation to pursue graduate study must be submitted. Normally these will 
be requested from faculty who have taught or supervised the student. The letters should be sent to 
the Department of Speech Communication. 

To remove conditional admission status, master's students must earn a 3.00 on the first nine 
(9) semester hours of coursework numbered 500 or above or on all coursework taken while 
completing this nine (9) hour requirement. The courses must be taken in the Speech Communication 
department. 

Applicants for the Doctoral Program 

Regular Admission: 

Master's Record — A cumulative GPA of 3.5 or better is required. 

Graduate Record Examination — Scores from the GRE must be submitted. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language — Applicants whose native language is not English must 
attain a TOEFL score of 550. 

Letters of Recommendation — Three current letters of recommendation that refer to the student's 
academic ability and preparation to pursue graduate study must be submitted. Normally these will 
be requested from faculty who have taught or supervised the student. The letters should be sent to 
the Department of Speech Communication. 

Statement of Goals — Applicants must submit a written statement of goals (500-750 words). This 
statement enables the applicant to discuss career plans, and to supply additional information that 
will assist in selecting those individuals who can most benefit from and contribute to the graduate 
communication programs. 

Conditional Admission: 

Students who do not meet the requirements for regular admission may be considered for conditional 
admission. The requirements for letters of recommendation and statement of goals are the same as 
for regular admission. 

To remove conditional admission status, doctoral students must earn a 3.5 on the first nine (9) 
semester hours of coursework numbered 600 or above or on all coursework taken while completing 
this nine (9) hour requirement. The courses must be in Speech Communication. 

International students must score at least 550 on the TOEFL examination before they can be 
admitted into any graduate program in the school. Members of all underrepresented groups are 
strongly encouraged to apply. 

Master of Arts Major: Communication 

Emphasis: Speech Communication 

All students pursuing this program in Communication must complete the following requirements: 

Hours 

Substantive Core 

SCM 600, SCM 735 6 

Research Methods 

SCM 720, Electives* •. 9 

SCMElectives 9 

Thesis 6 

*The research methods electives will be chosen from SCM 721, SCM 722, REF 602, REF 761. 

A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours must be completed, including thesis credit. Students may 
focus on organizational communication, interpersonal communication, or persuasion and social 
influence. At least eighteen (18) of these hours must be numbered 600 and above. All candidates 
must submit a scholarly thesis, take an oral comprehensive exam and defend the thesis. A 3.0 GPA is 
required for graduation. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study! Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



94 College of Arts and Letters 



111 



I! 



Master of Science Major: Communication 

Emphasis: Speech Communication 

All students pursuing this program in Communication must complete the following requirements: 

Hours 

Substantive Core 

SCM 600, SCM 735 6 

Research Methods 

SCM 720, Electives* 9 

SCMElectives 15 

*The research methods electives will be chosen from SCM 721, SCM 722, REF 602, REF 761. 



i A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours must be completed. Students may focus on organizational 

J communication, interpersonal communication, or persuasion and social influence. At least eighteen 

| (18) of these hours must be numbered 600 and above. All candidates must take a comprehensive 

|E|El written examination. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Doctoral students must complete: 1) a 6-hour theory core; 2) 15 hours of required and elective 
research methods courses; 3) 24-hours in their major areas of study, including at least one 
independent research course; and, 4) 12-hours of dissertation work. Students coming into the 
program without previous course work in speech communication must complete additional 
requirements. Details and explanations of these and other requirements for the doctoral degree may 
be found in the department's handbook for graduate students, which is available online at the Web 
address: http://wwwusm.edu/speech/scm-prog.htm. 

The student takes rigorous written and oral comprehensive examinations and submits and defends 
a scholarly dissertation pertaining to the area he or she elects to emphasize (see section on General 
Requirements and Regulations). A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Smdies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Department of Theatre and Dance 

Louis Rackoff, MFA, Chair 

Stacy Rcischtnan, MFA, Director of Dance 

118 College Drive #5052 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-4994 

Aronson, Boyd, Hammond, Hayes, Judd, Mullican, Nielsen, Post, Prieur, Rackoff, Reischman, Stellhorn 

The University of Southern Mississippi Department of Theatre and Dance is an accredited member 
of the National Association of Schools of Theatre. Theatre requirements are in accordance with the 
published regulations of this association. The Department of Theatre and Dance offers programs 
leading to the Master of Fine Arts degree in Theatre. 

To be eligible for admission, a student must have a bachelor's degree and have completed a 
minimum of twenty-one (21) semester hours of undergraduate coursework in theatre or theatre- 
related areas. Those who do not meet the minimum entrance requirements may be admitted but 
will be expected to take undergraduate courses to cover deficiencies. It should be emphasized that 
admission to the Graduate School does not imply acceptance of the student as a candidate for a 
graduate degree. (See general admission requirements and procedures as set forth in this Bulletin.) 



College of Arts and Letters 95 



Upon being admitted into a graduate program, the student will be assisted by the department 
graduate coordinator in selecting an appropriate graduate advisory committee composed of three 
faculty members, one of whom will serve as major professor. 

Before the end of the first week of classes, an entrance interview and audition/portfolio review is 
required of all students entering a master's program. 

Master of Fine Arts Degree in Theatre 

The objective of the Master of Fine Arts curriculum is to develop the educated performer by offering 
sound theory and intensive practical training simultaneously. Students in the Master of Fine Arts 
programs will elect a plan of study with specialization in one of the following areas: 
(1) directing (2) performance, or (3) design and technical theatre. 

Regular admission to a Master of Fine Arts program requires: (1) the submission of Graduate j| 
Record Examination scores; (2) an undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 in the t 
undergraduate major area or on the last 60 hours attempted, (3) acceptable performance audition b 
or portfolio evaluations; (4) three strong letters of recommendation, which should address the : 
applicant's academic preparation in the area of theatre; and (5) successful personal interviews. I 
The letters of recommendation should be sent to the department. Members of all underrepresented 
groups are strongly encouraged to apply. Directing Emphasis students are required to submit written 
play analysis material as part of the application process. Performance students will be required to 
demonstrate their proficiency in a "showcase" performance during the first semester in residence. 
Design emphasis students must present a portfolio for review by the faculty prior to the initial 
registration. If no portfolio is available, a student may be admitted on a conditional basis until an 
acceptable minimum proficiency is determined. 

The Master of Fine Arts program normally requires three years of full-time graduate study and 
the completion of a minimum approved program of sixty (60) hours with at least 18 hours of 
coursework at the 600 level or higher. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. It is recommended that 
the M.F.A. student spend at least one summer as a member of the Repertory Theatre program. The 
candidate will satisfactorily complete a creative project in his major area of emphasis and defend it 
orally before the Theatre faculty. Proficiency reviews will be required of all M.F.A. candidates at the 
conclusion of their second semester in residence. Comprehensive exam is required. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



96 



|| College of Arts and Letters 




Women's Studies Program Minor 

Jeanne Gillespie, Ph.D., Director 
118 College Drive #5004 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-6891 

The Women's Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary minor to students in any Southern Miss 
graduate degree program. The minor develops the student's proficiency in a variety of feminist 
theories and research methodologies at an advanced level. 

Plan of Study. The courses approved for the minor must be listed on the student's official Plan of 
Study. 

Requirements 

(1 ) a minimum nine (9) hours for the master's-level minor, or a minimum of 12 hours for the doctoral 
minor 

(2) WS 601, "Theories and Methods of Research in Women's Studies," OR, by the director of 
Women's Studies, approval of previous coursework in Women's Studies as equivalent to WS 601 

(3) the remaining hours fulfilled in electives from approved courses numbered 500 or above, and 
distributed across at least two disciplines in addition to the discipline of Women's Studies. These 
courses are: 

(a) regularly-taught courses approved for the minor: 
ANT 552, Language, Gender, and Culture 

AJ 563, Family Law 

AJ 564, Family Violence 

ENG 568, British Women Writers 

ENG 578, American Women Writers 

ENG 678, Topics in Writing by Women 

HIS 577, Women in American Society 

NSG 692, Special Problems in Women's Health (online) 

PS 505, Women and Politics 

SOC 515, Sociology of Gender; 

(b) WS 692, Special Problems in Women's Studies 

(c) special topics courses in various disciplines which are being offered for one semester only, as 
approved by the director. 

(4) a minimum 3.0 GPA in all courses counting toward the minor 



cross-listed as WS 527 
cross-listed as WS 528 
cross-listed as WS 503 

cross-listed as WS 602 
cross-listed as WS 510 

cross-listed as WS 520 
cross-listed as WS 525 



Since new courses may become available for Women's Studies credit in any given semester, the 
candidate should be advised by die director of Women's Studies as well as by the candidate's major 
professor. 



College of Business | 97 



College of Business 

Graduate Degrees 

2007-2008 



Department/School Major 



Degree 



School of Public 
Accountancy and 
Information Systems 



Business Administration 

MBA7MPH Dual Degree 
MBA MSM Dual Degree 

Accounting 



Master of Business 
Administration 



Master of Public 
Accountancy 




98 || College of Business 



111 

'A 



College of Business 



Alvin J. Williams, Ph.D., Interim Dean 

Joesph Peyrefilte, Ph.D., Interim Associate Dean 

Francis Daniel, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Academic Services 

Shirley Luse, Assistant to the Director 

118 College Drive #5021 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4653 



Mission 

The College of Business at The University of Southern Mississippi is committed to preparing our 
students for careers in business and to assisting organizations in South 
Mississippi. Accordingly, our programs emphasize 

• values conducive to personal and career development 

• the functions and environment of business 

• communication and critical thinking 

• the global dimensions of business 

• ethical decision-making 

To fulfill our mission, the college seeks a balanced and synergistic agenda of instruction, scholarly 
activity, and professional service. 

Graduate Degree Programs 

The following graduate degree programs are available on the Hattiesburg campus: a Master of 
Business Administration (M.B.A.) and a Master of Professional Accountancy (M.P.A.). The Master 
of Business Administration is also available on the Gulf Coast campus. These programs are 
accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The following dual degree 
programs are offered in collaboration with the College of Health; Masters of Public Health (MPH)/ 
M.B.A. and M.B.A./Master of Sport Management (MSM). 

Graduate assistantships are available for all College of Business graduate degrees. Students with 
good undergraduate records are encouraged to apply at the time they request admission. 

Degree Requirements 

Master of Business Administration 

Francis Daniel, Ph.D, Director 
Shirley Luse, Assistant to the Director 
Graduate Business Programs 
118 College Drive #5096 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4653 

Linda Jordan, Assistant to the Dean 
College of Business, Gulf Coast 
730 E. Beach Blvd 
Long Beach, MS 39560 
(228) 865-4505 

Bushardt, Carr, Carter, Chen, Dakhila, Daniel, Davis, Duhon, Green, Gunther, Haggard, Henderson, 
Henthorne, Hood, Hsieh, E. King, Klinedinst, Lambert, Lewis, Lindley, Madris, Magruder, Malik, Marvasti, 
Mixon, Monchuk, Niroomand, Nissan, Peyrefitte, Salter, Sequeira, Shi, R. Smith, W. Smith, Topping, Vest, 
Williams, Yang, Zantow 

Requests for application forms and other information may be addressed to the director of Graduate 
Business Programs, College of Business, The University of Southern Mississippi, 1 1 8 College Drive 
#5096, Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001. Telephone inquiries may be made by calling (601) 266-4653. 
Students may also apply on-line at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies. 



College of Business | 99 



A Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) is also offered on the Gulf Coast. Requests for 
application forms and other information may be addressed as indicated above. Telephone inquiries 
can also be made by calling (228) 867-2628 at Gulf Park. 

The M.B.A. program is available to students who have no previous coursework in business 
administration, as well as anyone whose background includes an undergraduate degree in a business 
discipline. Consequently, required M.B.A. coursework ranges from a minimum of 30 semester 
hours to a maximum of 48 semester hours. Specific degree requirements will be determined 
upon admission. Pre-program proficiency requirements include the ability to make use of word 
processing, spreadsheet, and database management software packages, as well as mathematical 
competence through managerial statistics and applied calculus. 

The M.B.A. program is broad in nature and aimed at developing managerial competence from a 
general perspective. Specifically, the M.B.A. curriculum 

strengthens critical thinking skills that involve the ability to structure and analyze 
problems creatively and to process data to yield useful information 

fosters thinking that is global in scope and integrative of the economic, technical, 
political-legal, and social-cultural dimensions 

provides pragmatic managerial decision-making skills through instruction in the 
fundamentals of the functional areas of business (accounting, financial analysis, etc.) 

develops skills in dealing with behavioral issues including the ability to function 
effectively as a decision maker, motivator, and leader 

increases awareness of and appreciation for ethical values, human dignity, cultural 
diversity, social responsibilities, and the need for continuous self-development 

develops the ability to think strategically and to function effectively in an environment of 
rapid change 

enhances written and oral communication skills 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Foundation course requirements are as follows: 
Courses 

MBA 500 

MBA 511 

MBA 520 



Hours 
....3 
....3 

. ...3 



Courses 



Hours 

3 

3 

3 



MBA 530 

MBA 550 

MBA 570 

(total foundation coursework: 18 hours) 

NOTE: The foregoing foundation course requirements will normally be waived for students who 
have undergraduate degrees in business. 

Advanced course requirements are as follows: 



Courses 
MBA 600 
MBA 605 
MBA 610 
MBA 640 



Courses 
MBA 645 .. . 
MBA 650 .. . 
MBA 660 .. . 
ELECTIVES 
(total advanced coursework: 30 hours) 



Hours 
. .. .3 
....3 
....3 
. ...3 



In some cases, pre-program courses should be taken prior to enrolling in M.B.A: classes. 

Dual Degree Programs 

The College of Business offers two dual degree programs in conjunction with the College of 
Health. The Master of Public Health/Master of Business Administration (MPH/MBA) degree 
program is designed for students interested in pursuing top-level administrative positions in 
health care organizations and/or consulting. The Master of Business Administration/Master 
of Sport Management (MBA/MSM) is ideal for those interested in careers at the executive 
level of the Sports Industry, offering industry experience as well as business expertise. Both dual 






m 



100 J| College of Business 



degree programs are a minimum 60 semester hours. Candidates must meet requirements and 
prerequisites of BOTH the MBA program and the partner program (MPH or MSM) in order to 
qualify for admission. More detailed information on these exciting programs is available online at 
vvww.usm.edu/mba. 

5-Year MBA Plan 

The 5-Year MBA Plan is designed with the exceptional non-business student in mind. The goal of 
the plan is to increase the marketability of these outstanding students by supplementing their major 
area academic preparation with the opportunity to earn an MBA with just one additional year of 
course work after graduation. 

With the approval of the Dean of the College of Business and the Dean of the student's college, 
students take up to 18 hours of 500-level graduate business courses during the last two years of 
their undergraduate career. These 500-level courses constitute an undergraduate minor in Business 
Administration. Participating students would then be prepared to enter the full-time one-year MBA 
program upon graduation {4+1}, provided they meet all other requirements for acceptance into the 
MBA program. 

Admission requirements for this plan include Junior standing, a non-business major, a minimum 
3.0 (on 4.0 scale) overall grade point average, and approval of the Dean of the College of Business 
and the Dean of the student's college. 

**Classes taken under this plan are considered undergraduate hours and cannot be used to satisfy 
other graduate degree requirements. In addition, students participating in the 5-Year MBA plan are 
required to take all 500-level MBA courses in a lecture setting (no online courses). 

Admission Standards 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's M.B.A. and M.P.A. programs is selective. Regular 
admission is contingent on having graduated from a college or university accredited by a recognized 
regional accrediting agency. In addition, the Graduate Admissions committee of the College of Business 
recommends admittance only for those applicants whose academic background, work experience, 
demonstrated leadership, and communication skills meet the challenging demands of graduate programs in 
management and accounting. 

In evaluating applications, the admission committee utilizes the following criteria: 

Undergraduate record — The cumulative grade point average (GPA) from all institutions, 
the area(s) of concentration, the balance of verbal/communication and quantitative/analytical 
courses, and the trend of grades are considered. 

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) — The GMAT is sponsored and directed by the 
Graduate Management Admission Council, consisting of representatives from graduate schools of 
management. A candidate should strive to achieve a good balance of verbal- and quantitative-area 
scores. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) — Students whose native language is not 
English must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the written exam, 213 on the computer 
exam. 

Work Experience — While work experience is not required for admission, two or more years of 
relevant managerial responsibility strengthen the likelihood of admission to the program. Applicants 
are encouraged to submit resumes showing job responsibilities and accomplishments. 

Letters of Recommendation — The admission committee reviews letters of recommendation 
to gain a more personal understanding of the applicant's leadership ability in terms of 
communication and interpersonal skills. Each applicant should request three recommendation 
letters, at least one of which addresses the applicant's academic preparation. Letters of 
recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for 
graduate study and should be sent to the department or school. 

Essay — The essay requirement provides the applicant an opportunity to demonstrate writing 
competency and communication skills. It also enables the applicant to provide specific examples 
of demonstrated leadership, to discuss career plans, and to supply additional information 
that will assist in selecting those individuals who can most benefit from and contribute to the 
graduate management or accounting programs. 



College of Business j 101 



Students may enroll in College of Business courses reserved exclusively for graduate students 
if they have regular admission to specific Southern Miss graduate programs and have taken 
the necessary prerequisites. In rare cases, students may be admitted conditionally. To remove 
conditional admission status, master's students must earn a B in each class on the first nine (9) 
semester hours of coursework numbered 500 or above or on all courses taken while completing 
this nine (9) hour requirement. Students with an undergraduate degree in business who have been 
accepted into the MBA. program may start on a full-time basis in the summer and fall semesters. 
Only part-time students will be allowed to start in the spring semester. Students who do not have an 
undergraduate degree in business but have been accepted into the MBA. program may start in the 
fall semester only as a full-time student. 

Students transferring from other graduate schools must meet the admission requirements stated 
above. At the time of admission, transfer students may request that up to six (6) semester hours of 
approved credit be applied toward degree requirements. Once enrolled, transfer of credit for courses 
taken at other institutions must be approved in advance. 

More detailed information on the admissions process is available online at www.usm.edu/mba. 

Academic Policies 

Application of credits and dismissal — Students who receive a grade of "C" in more than nine (9) 
hours of coursework will be dismissed from the program. Students may not apply hours toward a 
degree for courses in which there is a grade of "D"; students who receive grades of "D" in more 
than six (6) hours of coursework will be dismissed from the program. Students who receive grades 
of "F" in more than three hours of coursework will be dismissed from the program. Students must 
maintain a 3.0 GPA to be in good standing. 

Upon approval by the program director, students may repeat only one course to improve a 
cumulative grade point average. Students whose cumulative grade point average (GPA) or whose 
program GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on probation. Students must attain a cumulative 
3.0 GPA by the end of the following (probationary) semester or they may be dismissed from the 
program subject to review by a faculty committee and the program director. 

Graduation requirements — Students must complete course requirements with at least a 3.0 GPA for 
all graduate courses taken. In addition, all general requirements of The Graduate Studies Office must be 
met; this includes a comprehensive examination. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



School of Accountancy and Information 
Systems 

Stan Lewis, Ph.D., Director 
118 College Drive #5178 
Hatfiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4641 

Albin, Anderson, Clark, Depree, Henderson, Jordan, Pate, Posey, Smith 
* Associate Graduate Faculty 

Mission 

The School of Accountancy and Information Systems (SAIS) is an academic unit within the College 
of Business (COB) at The University of Southern Mississippi and is committed to the mission of the 
COB. Within this framework, the SAIS has its own unique mission. 

The primary mission of the accounting program is to (1) provide quality undergraduate business 
education to South Mississippi students with an entryway to the accoutring community and (2) to 
provide quality graduate accounting education to prepare South Mississippi students for professional 
employment. 

To accomplish this mission, the accounting faculty strives to produce BSBA graduates who are 



102 I College of Business 



»« 



competent in entry-level business and accounting positions and have the educational background 
neceesary for advancement. MPA graduates are expected to be competent in professional accounting 
positions and have to have the educational background that will enable them to advance in the 
accounting profession. The program will also provide quality accounting education to other students 
whose chosen curriculum includes accounting. Therefore, as its first priority, the SAIS emphasizes 
excellent teaching in an environment of continuous curriculum development. The SAIS also encourages 
scholarly, professionally, and pedagogical research as well as professional service to maintain the 
currency of its faculty and curriculum. 

The objective of the graduate curriculum is to provide more depth and breadth in accounting and 
related subjects than can be accomplished in a four-year program. Enrollment in the school's 
graduate program is limited to those students who show a high probability of success. 

The school offers one degree — the Master of Professional Accountancy. The program leading to the 
M.P.A. is essentially the culmination of a five-year program. A student who earns the bachelor's 
degree with a major in accounting may normally complete the M.P.A. program with one year's 
additional work. A minimum of thirty (30) hours of graduate work is required. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
wvvw.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Students with a variety of educational backgrounds may enter the program. Students who have 
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university must either transfer or take the 
following business environment and tool courses: 



Applied Calculus for Business (3 hours) 

Principles of Economics (6 hours) 

Managerial Statistics I (3 hours) 

Managerial Statistics II (3 hours) 

Management for Organizations (3 hours) 

Legal Environment of Business (3 hours) 



Advanced Business Law (3 hours) 

Principles of Finance (3 hours) 

Global Managerial Policy and 

Strategy (3 hours) 

Management Information Systems (3 hours) 
Principles of Marketing (3 hours) 



The following lower-division accounting courses are also required: 



Principles of Accounting (3 hours) 

Accounting Processes and Systems (3 hours) 

Intermediate Accounting (6 hours) 

Advanced Accounting (3 hours) 

Auditing (3 hours) 



Cost Accounting (3 hours) 

Income Tax Accounting (3 hours) 

Government and Not-for-Profit 
Accounting (3 hours) 



Professional-level courses for M.P.A.: 

ACC 605 - Current Accounting Theory and Research 

ACC 610 - Advanced Auditing 

ACC 620 - Advanced Cost/Managerial Accounting 

ACC 630 - Tax Seminar I 

ACC 631 -Tax Seminar II 

ACC 660 - Controllership 

MBA 640 - Problems in Corporate Finance 
MBA 645 - Communication Skills for Managers 
MBA 6XX - Any 600-level MBA course 
MBA 6XX - Any 600-level MBA course 

A minimum often (10) courses must be taken at the graduate level with at least seven (7) courses 
numbered over 600 and at least three (3) MBA courses. 



College of Business | 103 



Admission to the Program 

Admission requirements for the M.P.A. program are the same as those listed for the MBA. 
program. Admission forms are available in the Graduate Business Programs Office, JGH Room 307. 
Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Graduation and Retention Standards 

Graduation and retention standards for die M.P.A. program are the same as those listed above for the 
MBA. program. 



Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 




104 (J College of Education and Psychology 



College of Education and 



Psychology 

Graduate Degrees 
2007-2008 



Department/School 



Major 



Degree 



Master's Level 

Child and Family Studies 



Educational Curriculum, 
Instruction, and 
Special Education 



Child and Family Studies 

Early Intervention 

Marriage and Family Therapy 



Education (CUI) 

Early Childhood 
Elementary Education Emphasis 
Reading Education Emphasis 
Secondary Education Emphasis 



Master of Science 
Master of Science 
Master of Science 



Master of Education 
Master of Science 



Educational Leadership 
and Research 



Special Education Master of Education 

Master of Science 
Behavior Disorders Emphasis (MED) 
Gifted Education Emphasis (MED) 
Learning Disabilities Emphasis (MED) 
Mental Retardation 
Mild/Moderate Emphasis (MED) 
Severe/Profound Emphasis (MED) 



Library and Information Science 



Early Intervention 



Adult Education 

Counseling and Personnel Services 

College Student Personnel 

Emphasis 

School Counseling Emphasis 
Educational Administration 

Library and Information Science 



Psychology 



Technology Education 



Psychology (Ph.D. Track) 
Counseling Psychology 
Psychology 



Technology Education 
Business Technology 
Education Emphasis 
Technical and Occupational 
Education Emphasis 
Instructional Technology 



Master of Science 



Master of Education 
Master of Education 



Master of Education 

Master of Library and 
Information Science 



Master of Arts 
Master of Science 
Master of Science 



Master of Science 



Master of Science 



College of Education and Psychology | 105 



Department/School 



Major 



Degree 



Specialist's Level 

Educational Curriculum, 
Instruction, and 
Special Education 



Education Specialist in Education 

Early Childhood Education Emphasis 

Elementary Education Emphasis 

Reading Education Emphasis 

Secondary Education Emphasis 
Special Education 



Educational Leadership 
and Research 



Education 

Adult Education Emphasis 
Educational Administration Emphasis 
Educational Research Emphasis 
Higher Education Administration Emphasis 



Specialist in Education 



School of Library and 
Information Science 



Library and Information Science 



Specialist in Library 
and Information 
Science 



Doctoral Level 

Educational Curriculum, 
Instruction, and 
Special Education 



Educational Leadership 
and Research 



Psychology 



Education 

Elementary Education Emphasis 
Secondary Education Emphasis 
Special Education Emphasis 

Education 

Adult Education Emphasis 
Educational Administration Emphasis 

Hieher Education 



Psychology 

Clinical Emphasis 
Counseling Emphasis 
Experimental Emphasis 
School Emphasis 



Doctor of Education or 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Education or 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Doctor of Education or 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Doctor of Philosophy 



106 || College of Education and Psychology 



College of Education and 
Psychology 

Wanda S. Mauiding, Ed.D., Interim Dean 
Ronald A. Styron, Ed.D., Interim Associate Dean 
118 College Drive #5023 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4568 

The University of Southern Mississippi, through its College of Education and Psychology, 
holds membership in the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the Teacher 
Education Council of State Colleges and Universities, and the Southern Regional Consortium of 
Colleges of Education. All programs in professional and teacher education are fully accredited by 
the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and doctoral programs in 
clinical psychology, counseling psychology, and school psychology are accredited by the American 
Psychological Association (APA). The master's degree in library and information science is 
accredited by the American Library Association (ALA). The master's degree in Marriage and Family 
is accredited by the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. For degrees offered by 
each department, please see the previous page. 

Mission 

The mission of the College of Education and Psychology is to provide quality programs in 
psychology, professional education, instructional technology, library and information science, 
and child and family studies. The college develops individuals who possess critical thinking and 
problem-solving abilities; theoretical, practical, and technical competence; effective communication 
skills; an appreciation for diversity; a sensitivity to standards of ethical conduct; and a commitment 
to lifelong learning. The college fulfills its mission through programs characterized by excellence in 
instruction and supervised practice, research training, scholarly productivity, leadership, professional 
service, and collaborative activities. 



vmm 



Conceptual Framework 



The University of Southern Mississippi's vision is relected in a broad theme adopted by our 
university community: "Freeing the Power of the Individual." The mission of The University 
of Southern Mississippi includes generating new knowledge, applying knowledge in service to 
humanity, facilitating an appreciation of artistic creations and performances, promoting cultural 
understanding, and, most importantly, fostering learning among students in ways that prepare them 
to become contributing citizens and leaders in a global society. Concisely stated, the university is in 
the business of helping people learn, and this learning occurs through the discovery, transmission, 
and application of knowledge. 

The overarching theme of the College of Education and Psychology and NCATE Unit conceptual 
framework is "Freeing the Power of the Individual." The Unit's conceptual framework is by 
design aligned with the university's vision and mission. The conceptual framework is consistent with 
the university's historical roots as a normal college and with the university's future. The university, 
since our founding in 1910, has been committed to outstanding preparation of teachers, counselors, 
administrators, and other school personnel. In accordance with this history and the present vision 
of the University, the mission of the Unit has seven-fold: a) preparing Mississippi teachers; b) 
cutting-edge research; c) creating a healthier region; d) leading in eceonomic development; e) taking 
Mississippi to the world; f) enhancing the cultural environment; and, g) educating the whole student 
(University Mission). Within these mission statements, the Unit has embedded the knowledge, 
skills, and dispositions to enable them to prepare effective educational leaders to serve a variety 
of roles in the P-12 setting. With this in mind, the outcomes in the areas of knowledge, skills, 
dispositions, and diversity goals all educational leaders graduating from The University of Southern 
Mississippi are to possess: 



College of Education and Psychology | 107 



Power of Knowledge to Inform 

• Understands general, as well as technological, content-specific pedagological skills 

• Understands and employs data-driven assessment processes 

• Competent in content knowledge 

• Understands implications of diversity in the classroom 

• Understands standards-based content knowledge 

• Understands theoretically-based knowledge of student learning processes 

Power to Inspire 

• Believes all can learn 

• Believes in ability to foster learning 

• Believes that best teaching is based on sound educational theory and research 

• Resilient 

• Values lifelong learning 

• Inspires and engages learners 

• Demonstrates ethical and professional dispositions 

Power to Transform Lives 

• Effectively demonstrates general, as well as technological, content-specific, pedagological skills 

• Interprets and uses assessment data to ensure and improve learning outcomes 

• Is able to teach so that all can succeed in a complex, changing society 

• Is a critical thinker and problem solver 

• Communicates effectively 

• Monitors safety and creates a physical environment which is conductive to learning 

Empower a Community of Learners 

• Continues professional and personal development 
« Responsible citizens of their communities 

• Is able to contribute to society in meaningful ways 

• Is able to build a learning community partners 

Department of Child and Family Studies 

Ann P. Blackwell, Ph.D., Chair 

W. Jeff Hinton, Ph.D., Director, Marriage and Family Therapy Program 

118 College Drive #5035 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4679 

Adams, Blackwell, Burgess, Gr antes, Hinton, West 



Unit Description 

The Department of Child and Family Studies offers the Master of Science degree in Child and 
Family Studies, Early Intervention, and Marriage and Family Therapy. These graduate programs 
are designed to meet career objectives in the areas administered by the department and to support 
the interests and personal goals of the student. All majors offer flexibility so that students can meet 
specific career goals or specialize in areas of interest to them. 

The department participates in the interdisciplinary minor in gerontology and graduate certificate 
in gerontology. Specific requirements and courses available for the minor and the certificate can be 
found under the Interdisciplinary Minor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology headings in the 
College of Health section of the Bulletin. 

Requirements for Admission 

Regular admission to the Graduate School for study in the master of science degree programs in the 
Department of Child and Family Studies requires a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution, 
a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.25 (on a 4.0 scale) in the last 64 hours of coursework, a 3.0 
GPA in major, submission of test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and three 
letters of recommendation from professionals familiar with the applicant's work and qualified to 
assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study. The letters of recommendation should offer clear 
support for the applicant's ability and potential for success in the program and should be sent to 
the Department of Child and Family Studies. Performance in specific courses related to die desired 



108 || College of Education and Psychology 



major will also be evaluated. Graduate work in the major and minor fields of specialization must be 
preceded by coursework sufficient to satisfy undergraduate requirements or enough related work 
to indicate the student's ability to do graduate work in the major and minor fields. Students may 
correct academic deficiencies by taking or auditing recommended undergraduate courses. Members 
of all underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. 

Requirements for Graduation 

In the Department of Child and Family Studies, the minimum requirement for a master's degree 
is 36 semester hours (18 hours of 600 level or higher) for Early Intervention or Child and Family 
Studies and a minimum of 60 hours for Marriage and Family Therapy. Thesis and non-thesis options 
are offered. All students will take oral comprehensive examinations. Non-thesis students will take 
written comprehensive exams. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the 
front section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 



Master of Science in Early Intervention 

Overview of Major 

The Master of Science degree in Early Intervention is an interdisciplinary program offered jointly 
by the Department of Child and Family Studies and the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and 
Special Education. The program requires a minimum of 36 semester hours (with 18 hours of 600 
level or higher). The program maintains active teaching, research and service links to the Institute for 
Disability Studies which offers application sites, graduate assistantships and other support services to 
the program. 

Career Opportunities 

The Master of Science degree in Early Intervention is designed to prepare students for positions in state 
and community-based systems with children aged birth to five years who have special needs. Program 
graduates are prepared to work in a variety of positions within public schools, child care, mental 
health and private and public health systems. Graduates are prepared for direct service roles as well as 
administrative/leadership positions. 

Special Program Requirements 

Students entering this program are expected to have an undergraduate background in related 

coursework, including the prerequisite courses SPE 400, The Psychology and Education of 

the Exceptional Individual, and CD 451 and 45 1L, Infant Development (with laboratory) or an 

approved equivalent. These prerequisites do not count toward the 36 semester hours required for 

the master's degree. 
Applicants must submit, in addition to other department admission requirements noted earlier, 

a letter of intent which contains a clear statement of professional goals and philosophy of 

professionalism. 
Students not previously holding a teaching license will be cleared for admission to teacher 

education (completion of a general core, 2.65 GPA on that core, and satisfaction of the Praxis I 

or equivalent) during entrance to Graduate School. 
Students entering the Master of Science program without licensure must satisfy a 9-credit 

practicum in place of the standard 3-credit practicum. Only 3 hours of practicum will be 

included in the 36-hour program requirement. 
Prior to taking written and oral comprehensive examinations, students must remove all grades of 

"I" (incomplete) from their records. 
Professional presentations are required of all graduate students vvho complete the Master of 

Science in Early Intervention. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Education and Psychology | 109 

Requirements for the Master of Science in Early Intervention 

Hours 

SPE 770 Administration and Supervision of Programs 3 

CD 652 Advanced Child Development 3 

CD 650 Theories in Child and Family Studies 3 

CD 688 Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities 3 

SPE 645 Assessment and Intervention for Individuals with Severe and Profound Disabilities 3 

SHS 730 Language Intervention with Infants 3 

CD 628 Assessment Procedures for Young Children with Disabilities 3 

CD 629 Advanced Intervention Procedures for Young Children with Disabilities 3 

CIE 778 Creative and Mental Growth 3 

FAM651 Parents and Children 3 

FAM 675 Practice of Family Research -OR- REF 601 Educational Research 3 

FAM 690 Practicum in Family Relations 3-9 

CD 698 Thesis (optional) 3 

Master of Science in Child and Family Studies 

Overview of Major 

The Master of Science degree in Child and Family Studies is a totally online program that focuses 
on the integration of theory, research and experiential learning. It builds on a foundation in family 
systems theory' and emphasizes leadership, critical thinking skills, and the connection between 
research and practice. Students are equipped with knowledge and skills necessary to promote quality 
of life and to serve as an effective advocate for families across the lifespan. The program requires a 
minimum of 36 semester hours (with 18 hours of 600 level or higher). 



Career Opportunities 

The program prepares graduates to create positive change through careers in organizations, agencies, 
and educational settings that serve children and families. Program graduates are also prepared to 
pursue advanced graduate work at the specialist and doctoral levels. 

Special Program Requirements 

Students seeking admission to this degree program must meet all admission criteria for 

the department and have a minimum GPA of 3.25 (on a 4.0 scale) on the last 64 hours of 

undergraduate study to qualify for regular admission. 
Applicants must submit, in addition to other department admission requirements noted earlier, 

a letter of intent which contains a clear statement of professional goals and philosophy of 

professionalism. 
Prior to taking written and oral comprehensive examinations, students must remove all grades of 

"I" (incomplete) from their records. 
Professional presentations are required of all graduate students who complete the Master of 

Science in Child and Family Studies. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



H 



lit 



IKE 



110 | College of Education and Psychology 

Requirements for a Master of Science in Child and Family Studies 
(36 hours non-thesis option; 36 hours thesis option) 

Students must take 18 hours of 600 level or higher courses. 

Core for all students in degree program. Hours 

CD 650 Theories in Child and Family Studies 3 

CD 652 Advanced Child Development 3 

FAM 551 Marriage Adjustment: Communication and Conflict 3 

FAM 645 Financial Problems of Families 3 

FAM 650 Individual and Family Life Cycle Development 3 

FAM 651 Parents and Children: Problem Resolution 3 

FAM 675 Practice of Family Research -OR- REF 601 Educational Research 3 

FCS501 Family Life Education 3 

CD 655 Practicum in Child Care Administration -OR- 

FAM 690 Practicum in Family and Consumer Studies 3 

27 

Possible electives: (minimum of 9 hours of electives required under guidance of adviser and 
approval of graduate committee.) 

Hours 

CD -OR- FAM 698 Thesis 6 

FAM 653 Aging and the Family 3 

FAM 692 Special Problems....' 3 

CJ 563 Family Law 3 

COH601 College Teaching in Health 3 

SWK 692 Special Problems (grant writing) 3 

Other courses from related fields, as approved by graduate committee 

Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy 

Overview of Major 

The Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy is an accredited program by the Commission 
on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education of the American Association for 
Marriage and Family Therapy. The two-year program of study combines academic coursework 
with supervised clinical experiences involving couples, individuals, and families. The program is 
designed to focus on the integration of theory, research, and clinical practice throughout family 
life span development. The contextual and ecological aspects of systemic family treatment are 
emphasized. The program consists of (1) the conceptual study of the family dynamics, family 
systems and subsystems, communication processes, and developmental family life cycle changes; 
(2) the diagnosis/assessment and treatment process utilizing the specific techniques associated 
with the major models of system change; (3) the study of human development in the context of 
the interface of interpersonal, intrapersonal, and intergenerational issues, intimacy and gender 
issues, and ethnic minority issues; (4) instruction related to professional socialization, legal and 
ethical considerations; (5) the application of research methodology and data analysis to the field of 
marriage and family therapy; and (6) supervised clinical practice which consists of a minimum of 
500 face-to-face contact hours with clients (conducted over a period of one calendar year). Of those 
500 hours, 250 hours must be with couples or families, and 250 hours must be completed at the 
University Clinic for Family Therapy. Students will receive one hour of supervision for every five 
hours of client contact for a minimum of 100 hours. Due to the professional nature of the marriage 
and family therapy program, student performance is evaluated at the following major transition 
points: (1) entry into the clinical component of the program, and (2) advancement through each step 
of a four-level practicum program. Movement through each transition point requires an endorsement 
by a majority of the marriage and family therapy faculty. Graduates of the program are prepared 
to fill family therapy leadership roles in both public and private human services agencies, public 
and private psychiatric hospitals, and in mental health services to industry. Comprehensive exam is 
required. 

Special Program Requirements 

In addition to requirements for admission to the school, the marriage and family therapy program 
requires a personal interview with the program director and the clinical faculty, and emotional 
stability and maturity, as evidenced through at least three letters of recommendation from previous 
professors or employers. Students wishing to apply to the marriage and family therapy program 
are encouraged to turn in their application at any time prior to March 1 for priority consideration. 
Interviews begin in March to select students to be admitted to the program each year. 



College of Education and Psychology | 111 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Requirements for Master of Science in Marriage and Family Therapy 

(60-hour minimum) 

Hours 

FAM 610 Marital Therapy 3 

FAM 615 Gender and Culture in the Family 3 

FAM 600 Prepracticum in Marriage and Family Therapy 3 

FAM 650 Individual and Family Life Cycle Development 3 

FAM 651 Parents and Children: Problem Resolution 3 

FAM 655 Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy 1 3 

FAM 656 Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy II 3 

FAM 659 Ethics and Professional Issues in Marriage and Family Therapy 3 

FAM 660 Assessment in Marriage and Family Therapy 3 

FAM 663 Professional Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy 3 

FAM 665 Sex Therapy 3 

FAM 675 Practice of Family Research 3 

FAM 692 Special Problems in Family Relations 3 

FAM 790 Supervised Practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy (4 semesters min.) 21 

*Student must complete the following minimum practicum requirements prior to graduation: 

1) 500 hours of face-to-face client contact 

2) 250 hours of the client contact must be relational therapy (couples or families) 

3) 100 hours of supervision, comprising both group and individual supervision 

4) 50 hours of supervision must be based on raw data (live, videotape, or audiotape) 

5) 250 client contact hours must be completed at the University Clinic for Family Therapy 
Electives 3 

Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and 
Special Education 

Dana G. Thames, Ph.D., Chair 
118 College Drive #5057 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-6987 



Bowles, Daves, Filce, Foxworth, Hillman, Jones, Karnes, Lowrey, Reeves-Kazelskis, McDowell, Morgan, 
Richmond, Samblis, Shirvani, Sylvest, Thames, Walker, York 

Education Code of Ethics and Standards for Professional Practice: Each student will be given 
a copy of the Code of Ethics and the Standards for Professional Practices. Students are expected 
to abide by these standards at all times. Breaches of this code and/or of the standards may result in 
disciplinary action through the department or the university. 

The Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education offers graduate degrees in the 
areas of early childhood education, elementary education, reading education, secondary education, 
and special education. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 



112 | College of Education and Psychology 



m. 



i 



Master of Education or Master of Science 
Major 

Education: Curriculum and Instruction 
Emphasis Areas 
Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Reading Education 
Secondary Education 

Specialization Areas (Secondary) 

Art Foreign Language 

Biology Mathematics 

Chemistry Music Education 

English Physical Education 



Physics 

Science 

Social Studies 

Speech Communication 



Master of Education or Master of Science 

Major 

Special Education 
Emphasis Area 

Behavior Disorders 

Gifted Education 

Learning Disabilities 

Mental Retardation: Mild/Moderate 

Mental Retardation: Severe/Profound 

Master of Science 

Major 

Early Intervention 

Graduate degrees in the content areas of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education are 
contingent on satisfaction of lower-level program requirements. Students seeking a master's degree 
in the content area of curriculum and instruction or in special education must have or be eligible for 
a Mississippi Class-A standard license, or its equivalent, in the area of study; applicants not meeting 
Class-A licensure standards in the proposed area of study will be required to take prescribed 
prerequisite coursework. Students entering the curriculum and instruction or the special education 
master's program who desire AA-level Mississippi licensure must meet all A-level requirements 
prior to seeking advanced licensure. Individuals who are matriculating at Southern Miss should 
become aware of the licensure requirements of those states where they wish to be licensed and 
should work with the department to see that those requirements are met. 

Teaching Experience Requirement 

The department strongly recommends that a student gain at least one year of teaching experience 
before entering the master's degree program. Students must have two (2) years of teaching 
experience prior to completion of the master's degree. 



Master's Programs for Curriculum and Instruction Content Area 

The Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education offers a Master of Education degree 
with a major in curriculum and instruction and emphasis areas in early childhood education, elementary 
education, reading education, and secondary education. The Master of Science degree is offered with 
a major in curriculum and instruction with emphasis areas in early childhood education, elementary 
education, reading education, and secondary education. The program of study at the master's degree 
level is designed to increase the professional competency of the classroom teacher and to provide the 
coursework necessary to meet standards of teaching licensure at this advanced level. The master's degree 
programs require admission to a particular program, appointment with the department, completion and 
submission of four copies of the application form for a master's degree at least one semester in advance 
of the date of graduation, successful completion of the comprehensive examination, and completion of all 
coursework requirements. 



College of Education and Psychology | 113 



Admission Requirements 

Admission to master's programs offered in the content area of curriculum and instruction is selective. 
To be considered for regular admission to a master's degree program, an applicant must have 

(a) an academic record reflecting a superior undergraduate grade point average. Recently, students 
regularly admitted to master's programs in curriculum and instruction have obtained average GPAs 
of 3.40 (4 scale) for the last two years of undergraduate study; 

(b) results from a national standardized achievement/aptitude test predictive of the ability to complete 
a graduate program successfully. These include the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the 
Miller Analogies Test (MAT), 

(c) three letters of recommendation sent to the department from professionals in die field of education 
who are qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study; 

(d) a letter of intent (describe reasons for pursuing a master's degree); also serves as a writing sample, 

(e) a professional resume; and 
(0 a copy of educator license. 



Admission 

The department reviews qualified applicants for graduate work throughout the academic year. 
Applications adhering to these dates will receive notification on the specified date as mentioned. 



Semester 



Application Deadline 



Notification Date 



Fall 

Spring 

Summer 



First Monday in April 
First Monday in September 
First Monday in March 



First Monday in May 
First Monday in October 
First Monday in April 



Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Admission to master's programs is contingent on the approval of the Departmental Graduate 
Committee, department chair, and die dean of the college. An applicant who fails to meet the above 
criteria for regular admission may be considered for conditional admission on an individual basis. 
Students accepted on a conditional basis MUST obtain grades of B or better on the first nine (9) 
hours of specified coursework 500-level or higher or all coursework taken while completing this 
nine hour requirement. It is the responsibility of the student to inform the department chair or the 
graduate coordinator when conditional status is to be removed. Additional requirements may be 
specified based on the applicant's deficiencies. 

Applicants seeking a graduate degree in the content area of curriculum and instruction who do not 
have a bachelor's degree in education must first fulfill all requirements for a bachelor's degree in 
education. Applicants holding a bachelor's degree in education who are seeking a master's degree in 
an education area other than the area in which the education bachelor's degree was received must, 
in addition to the thirty (33 for thesis programs) hours required for a master's degree, complete an 
additional 12 hours of curriculum or methods coursework at the graduate or undergraduate level. 
This coursework shall be prescribed by the department chair or graduate coordinator. In the event 
that the applicant has not previously completed student teaching requirements, 14 hours of student 
teaching must be completed. 

All graduate programs require a 3.0 GPA or better for graduation. No course with a grade lower than 
"C" will count toward the degree. 

Substitutions for required courses must be approved in advance and in writing by the graduate 
coordinator or the department chair. Transfer credit (see general master's degree requirements) 
must have prior approval by the graduate coordinator or department chair. In addition to the above 
requirements, the individual must pass comprehensive examinations. Each student is allowed 
only two attempts to pass comprehensive examinations. Each student should register with the 
department's graduate secretary for comprehensive examinations one to three months prior to the 
examination. It is the responsibility of the student to keep abreast of the dates and times of the 
comprehensive exams. Comprehensive exams are administered over each semester: the fourth 
Friday of October, February, and June. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



mm 



114 j| College of Education and Psychology 



Master's Degrees 

Master of Science and Master of Education in Education with Emphasis in Early 
Childhood Education 

Plan I (M.S. degree) 

REF 601, 607 , 6 

CIE 606, 770, 772, 776, 777, 778 18 

Elective 3 

CIE698 '. 6 

Hours 33 
Plan II (M.Ed, degree) 

REF 601, 607 6 

CIE 606, 770, 772, 776, 777, 778 18 

Elective 3 

CIE 728 3 

Hours 30 

Master of Science and Master of Education in Education with Emphasis in 
Elementary Education 

Plan I (M.S. degree) 

REF 601, 607 6 

CIE 606, 724, 725, 776 12 

CIR705 3 

Electives (Select 2 courses from the following: 

CIE 691, 728, 768, 778, CIR 691, 706, 729, 

EDA 600; GHY 617; REF 604, 660; SME 730, 731, 732, 733) 6 

CIE 698 6 

Hours 33 
Plan II (M.Ed, degree) 

REF 601, 607 6 

CIE 606, 724, 725, 776 12 

CIR 705 3 

Electives (Select 2 courses from the following: 

CIE 691, 768, 778; CIR 706, 729; EDA 600; 

GHY617, REF 604, 660; SME 730, 731, 732, 733) 6 

CIE 728 3 

Hours 30 

Master of Science and Master of Education in Education with Emphasis in Reading 

Plan I (M.S. degree) 

REF 601, 607 6 

CIR 691, 705, 706, 713, 721, 729, 733, 754 24 

CIE 698, 728 9 

Hours 39 

Plan II (M.Ed, degree) 

REF 601, 607 6 

CIR 691, 705, 706, 713, 721, 729, 733, 736, 754 27 

CIE 728 3 

Hours 36 

Master of Science and Master of Education in Education with Emphasis in 
Secondary Education 

Plan I (M.S. degree) 

REF 601, 607 6 

CIS 700 3 

CIR 754 3 

Specialization 15 

CIS 698 6 

Hours 33 



College of Education and Psychology | 115 

Plan II (M.Ed, degree) 

REF601.607 6 

CIS 700 3 

CIR754 3 

Specialization 15 

CIS 708 3 

Hours 30 
The course requirements of Plan I and Plan II require a specialization of at least fifteen (15) 
semester hours that must be taken in one of the following areas: 

Art Music Education 

Biology Physical Education 

Chemistry Physics 

English Science** 

Foreign Language Social Studies*** 
Mathematics* 

*The student selecting mathematics as a specialization area may not use any mathematics course 
designated as a mathematics refresher course, and courses with the MAT prefix must be approved by 
the mathematics department and die Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education. 

**The student selecting science as a specialization area may use, with the approval of his or her 
adviser, a combination of biological and physical science courses; however, a minimum of nine 
(9) semester hours of graduate credit must be taken in an area of science for which the student 
holds a Class-A endorsement. A student who holds Class-A endorsements in two or more areas of 
science may qualify for Class- AA licensure in two areas by completing nine (9) semester hours of 
graduate credit in one of the endorsement areas and six (6) semester hours of graduate credit in the 
other endorsement area. No more than three (3) hours of science and mathematics education (SME) 
courses may be used. To be used in an endorsement area, the SME course must be in that area. 

***The student selecting social studies as a specialization area may take courses in any one or a combination 
of die following disciplines: history, geography, political science, sociology, and economics. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Master's Programs for Special Education Content Area 

The Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education offers several options to the 
student for a Master's of Education degree program. This program is open only to teachers who 
have already obtained licensure. 

Teachers who have gained special education licensure through alternative routes will be required 
to take a program of at least thirty-six (36) hours and may need to take additional courses to fulfill 
deficiencies. In all areas of emphasis, an additional practicum may be required for teachers with 
little or no experience in working with the specific population of students being emphasized. 
Licensure resulting from the master's degree is the responsibility of the student obtaining the degree. 
Clarification of licensure outcomes should be confirmed prior to beginning the program. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the 
front section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Master of Education in Special Education with Emphasis in Behavior Disorders 

For students who are presently certified in Mississippi at the bachelor's level in special 
education, not by alternative route or add-on licensure: The student must provide evidence that 
the following prerequisites have been successfully completed: SPE 400 or equivalent coursework 
and professionally appropriate experience with behavior disorders. 

Non-Thesis/Thesis Program 

REF601.607 6 

SPE 709, 770 6 

Behavioral Disorders Emphasis Area (SPE 631, 632, 641, 650, 651, 652, 654) 21 

Minimum Hours 33 
Students who wish to pursue a non-thesis track will prepare and defend a professional portfolio (i.e., 
comprehensive examination). 



"Wii 



Ifl^fc:-' 



mfsM-?- 



lib 



116 I College of Education and Psychology 

Master of Education in Special Education with Emphasis in Gifted Education 

For students who are presently certified in Mississippi at the bachelor's level in special 
education, not by alternative route or add-on licensure: The student must provide evidence that 
the following prerequisites have been successfully completed: SPE 400 or equivalent coursework 
and professionally appropriate experience with gifted education. 

Non-Thesis/Thesis Program 

REF601,607 6 

SPE 709, 770 6 

Gifted Education Emphasis Area (SPE 560, 661, 662, 663, 664) 

(SPE Electives) 18 

Minimum Hours 30 

Master of Education in Special Education with Emphasis in Mental Retardation 
(Mild/Moderate) 

For students who are presently certified in Mississippi at the bachelor's level in special 
education, not by alternative route or add-on licensure: The student must provide evidence that 
the following prerequisites have been successfully completed: SPE 400 or equivalent coursework 
and appropriate professional experience with students with mild/moderate disabilities. 

Non-Thesis/Thesis Program 

REF 601, 607; SPE 709, 770 12 

Select One Area of Emphasis (Mental Retardation or Specific Learning Disabilities) 
Mental Retardation (SPE 630, 640, 641, 643, 651) 
and select one of the two LD courses (SPE 631, 632) 

Specific Learning Disabilities (SPE 630, 63 1,632, 640, 64 1,651) 18 

Minimum Hours 30 

Master of Education in Special Education with Emphasis in Mental Retardation 
(Severe/Profound) 

For students who are presently certified in Mississippi at the bachelor's level in special 



itpsp-y education, not by alternative route or add-on licensure: The student must provide evidence that 

OB tne following prerequisites have been successfully completed: SPE 400 or equivalent coursework 
and appropriate professional experience with students with severe/profound disabilities. 



Non-Thesis/Thesis Program 

REF 601, 607 6 

SPE 709, 770 6 

Severe/Profound Disabilities Emphasis Area 

Developmental Disabilities (SPE 578, 688) 

Mental Retardation (SPE 641, 643, 645) 

Behavior Management (SPE 651) 18 

Elective (Select one, three (3)-hour elective from the following: SPE 597, 598, 640, 650) 3 

Minimum Hours 33 

Substitutions for required courses must be approved in advance and in writing by the graduate 
coordinator or the department chair. Transfer credit must have prior approval by the graduate 
coordinator or department chair. In addition to the above requirements, the individual must 
pass comprehensive examinations. Each student is allowed two attempts to pass comprehensive 
examinations. Each student should register with the department's graduate secretary for 
comprehensive examinations, one to three months prior to the examination. It is the responsibility of 
the student to keep abreast of the dates and times of the comprehensive exams. 



Master of Science in Early Intervention 

The Master of Science degree in early intervention is an interdisciplinary program between the 
School of Family and Consumer Sciences and the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and 
Special Education. This thirty-six (36)-hour degree program is designed to prepare students to work 
in state- and community-based service systems serving infants and toddlers with disabilities (ages 
birth through five (5) years). 



117 j| College of Education and Psychology 

Non-Thesis/Thesis Program 

Prerequisite Courses: SPE 400/500 and CD 451/551 (does not count toward degree program) 

REF601 3 

SPE 598, 628, 629, 688, 692, 770 18 

SHS730 3 

CD 650, 652 6 

Elective (Select two, three (3) hour electives) (CIP) 6 

Minimum Hours 36 

Specialist Programs for Curriculum, Instruction, and Special 
Education 



It is strongly recommended that students who anticipate eventually entering into a doctoral program 
at Southern Miss or any other institution NOT apply for admission to the specialist program. The 
specialist degree may be considered by some institutions as a terminal degree, and as such could 
become an impediment to advanced study. 

The Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education offers the Specialist in Education 
degree with a major in education: curriculum and instruction, with the option of the selection of an 
emphasis in early childhood education, elementary education, reading education, special education, 
or secondary education. Students pursuing a specialist's degree with emphasis in secondary 
education may choose a specialization from a number of teaching (subject) areas. 

Entrance into a particular specialist's degree program presupposes that the student has completed, 
or is willing to complete, the coursework required for that program at the master's degree level, and 
holds or will obtain a Class-AA Mississippi license or equivalent. 

All specialist's degree programs require a minimum of thirty-four (34) graduate semester hours 
beyond the master's degree. 

The specialist's degree program requires admission to a particular program; submission of an 
approved program of studies; completion of all required coursework, to include die completion of 
one full-time semester/term of residence taking all nine (9) semester hours on either the Hattiesburg 
campus or the Gulf Park campus; successful completion of the specialist's comprehensive 
examination; or completion and defense of an approved thesis or field problem. Students must have 
a 3.0 GPA to graduate. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to specialist's programs offered in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and 
Special Education is selective. To be considered for regular admission to a specialist's degree 
program, an applicant must have 

(a) an academic record reflecting a superior grade point average on previous graduate work. Recently, 
students regularly admitted to specialist's programs in curriculum, instruction, and special 
education have obtained average GPAs of 3.50 (4.0 scale) on previous graduate coursework; 
(b)results from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) a national standardized achievement/aptitude 
test predictive of the ability to complete a specialist's program successfully, 

(c) three letters of recommendation sent to the department from professionals in the field of education 
who are qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study; 

(d) a letter of intent (describe reasons for pursuing a specialist's degree); also serves as a writing 
sample; 

(e) a professional resume; and 

(f) a copy of educator license. 

Admission Deadlines 

The department reviews qualified applicants for graduate work throughout the academic year. 
Applications adhering to these dates will receive notification on the specified date as mentioned. 



Semester 



Application Deadline 



Notification Date 



Fall First Monday in April First Monday in May 

Spring First Monday in September First Monday in October 

Summer First Monday in March First Monday in April 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 






m 






118 I College of Education and Psychology 



Admission to specialist's programs offered in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and 
Special Education is contingent on the approval of the Departmental Graduate Committee, 
department chair, and the dean of the college. An applicant who fails to meet the above criteria for 
regular admission may be considered for conditional admission on an individual basis. Additional 
requirements may be specified based on the applicant's deficiencies. 

Students accepted on a conditional basis MUST obtain a 3.40 GPA or better on their first nine (9) 
hours of specified coursework 600 level or higher on all coursework taken while completing this 9- 
hour requirement. It is the responsibility of the student to inform the department chair, or graduate 
coordinator when conditional status is to be removed. 

Teaching Experience Requirement 

No student will be eligible to receive a specialist's or doctoral degree until he or she has completed at 
least three years of teaching experience at a grade or in the area of disability appropriate for the degree. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Specialist's Degree 

Specialist in Education with Emphasis in Early Childhood Education 

REF602 3 

EDA 620 3 

CIR705or729 3 

CIE 762, 790, 798 9 

Elective (one three (3) hour elective) 3 

Early Childhood Education 

Coursework Emphasis Area (Select 12 hours of 

additional coursework in the cognate area of Early Childhood) 12 

Hours 33 

The specialist's program with an emphasis in early childhood education consists of a minimum of 
thirty-three (33) semester hours beyond the master's degree. Substitutions for required courses must 
be approved in advance and in writing by the graduate coordinator or the department chair. Transfer 
credit must have prior approval by the graduate coordinator or department chair. In addition to 
the above requirements, the individual must plan, conduct, and report the results of a research- 
based field problem. The comprehensive examination requirement for this degree will be met by 
presenting the results of the study to a committee of no fewer than three (3) faculty members in 
the department. A chair will be assigned to direct the research by the graduate coordinator and the 
department chair. 

Specialist in Education with Emphasis in Elementary Education 

REF602 3 

EDA 620 3 

CIR705or729 3 

CIE 762, 790, 798 9 

Elective (one three (3) hour elective) 3 

Elementary Education - 

Coursework Emphasis Area (Select 12 hours of 

additional coursework in one subject area of Elementary Education) 12 

Hours 33 



College of Education and Psychology | 119 



The specialist's program with an emphasis in elementary education consists of a minimum of thirty- 
three (33) semester hours beyond the master's degree. Substitutions for required courses must be 
approved in advance and in writing by the graduate coordinator or the department chair. Transfer 
credit must have prior approval by the graduate coordinator or department chair. In addition to 
the above requirements, the individual must plan, conduct, and report the results of a research- 
based field problem. The comprehensive examination requirement for this degree will be met by 
presenting the results of the study to a committee of no fewer than three (3) faculty members in 
the department. A chair will be assigned to direct the research by the graduate coordinator and the 
department chair. 

Specialist in Education with Emphasis in Reading Education 

REF602 3 

CIE762, 790 6 

EDA 620 3 

CIE/CIS798 3 

Elective (one three (3) hour elective) 3 

Reading Emphasis Area or Collateral Field 18 

Hours 36 

The specialist's program with an emphasis in reading education consists of a minimum of thirty- 
three (33) semester hours beyond the master's degree. Substitutions for required courses must be 
approved in advance and in writing by the graduate coordinator or the department chair. Transfer 
credit must have prior approval by the graduate coordinator or department chair. In addition to 
the above requirements, the individual must plan, conduct, and report the results of a research- 
based field problem. The comprehensive examination requirement for this degree will be met by 
presenting the results of the study to a committee of no fewer than three (3) faculty members in 
the department. A chair will be assigned to direct the research by the graduate coordinator and the 
department chair. 

Specialist in Education with Emphasis in Secondary Education 

REF602 3 

EDA 620 or REF 81 8 3 

CIS 790 3 

CIR 754 or CIS 708 3 

Elective (one three (3) hour elective) 3 

CIS 798 : 3 

,"MwS 
Secondary Education Emphasis Areas (a specialization of at least fifteen ( 1 5) semester hours) &i jfj -". 

must be taken in one of the following areas: Art, Biology, Chemistry, English, Mathematics*, H ?-l 

Music Education, Physical Education, Physics, Science**, 

Social Studies***, Speech Communication 15 

Hours 33 

The specialist's program in secondary education consists of a minimum of thirty-three (33) semester 
hours beyond the master's degree. Substitutions for required courses must be approved in advance 
and in writing by the graduate coordinator or the department chair. Transfer credit must have prior 
approval by the graduate coordinator or department chair. In addition to the above requirements, 
the individual must plan, conduct, and report the results of a research-based field problem. The 
comprehensive examination requirement for this degree will be met by presenting the results of the 
study to a committee of no less than three (3) faculty members in the department. A chair will be 
assigned to direct the research by the graduate coordinator and the department chair. 

*The student selecting mathematics as a specialization area may not use any mathematics course 
designated as a mathematics refresher course, and courses with MAT prefix must be approved by 
the mathematics department and the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education. 

**The student selecting science as a specialization area may use, with the approval of his or her 
adviser, a combination of biological and physical science courses; however, a minimum of nine (9) 
semester hours of graduate credit must be taken in each area of science endorsement for which the 
individual holds a Class-AA endorsement. The student must meet the requirements for a Class AAA 
endorsement in at least one science area. No more than three (3) hours of science and mathematics 
education (SME) courses may be used. To be used in an endorsement area, the SME course must be 
in that area. 



-:.; ; - : .'j'< 



120 



College of Education and Psychology 



***The student selecting social studies as a specialization area may take courses in any one or 
a combination of the following disciplines: history, geography, political science, sociology, and 



economics. 






III*- 



Specialist in Special Education 

The specialist's degree is granted upon completion of a specifically planned program of study 
leading to competency in an area of special education. The purpose of this program is to train 
highly qualified personnel in the education of exceptional children and adults. The program consists 
of a minimum of thirty-three (33) semester hours in a planned sequence to include the major 
area, cognates, research, and practicum. A thesis (SPE 798) is required. A 3.0 GPA is required for 
graduation. 

The specialist's program in special education consists of a minimum of thirty-three (33) semester 
hours beyond the master's degree. 

Substitutions for required courses must be approved in advance and in writing by the graduate 
coordinator or the department chair. Transfer credit must have prior approval by the graduate 
coordinator or department chair. In addition to the above requirements, die individual must plan, 
conduct, and report the results of a research-based field problem. The comprehensive examination 
requirement for this degree will be met by presenting the results of the study to a committee of 
no fewer than three (3) faculty members in the department. A chair will be assigned to direct the 
research by the graduate coordinator and the department chair. 

Doctoral Programs for Curriculum and Instruction Content Area 

The Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education offers Doctor of Education and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees with a major in education with an emphasis in elementary education 
or secondary education. If a student desires to receive a Doctor of Philosophy degree, he or she 
should follow one of the doctoral programs outlined in this section and, in addition, gain proficiency 
in a foreign language. 



The doctoral program with an emphasis in elementary education provides for specialization in either 
early childhood education or in reading. A student choosing an emphasis in elementary education, 
with or without a specialization in either early childhood education or in reading, must complete the 
requisite coursework in that area prior to beginning doctoral study. 

The doctoral program with an emphasis in secondary education provides for specialization in 
various teaching (subject) areas as well as in reading. A student specializing in a particular area must 
complete the requisite coursework in that area prior to beginning doctoral study. 

All doctoral programs consist of a minimum of seventy-five (75) graduate semester hours beyond 
the master's degree. More than seventy-five (75) hours may be required in order to satisfy 
deficiencies which may exist in the student's background and preparation. Doctoral comprehensive 
exam is required. 

Students should consult the departmental guidelines, Admission Requirements, Procedures Section, 
and the General Academic Requirements section of the Graduate Bulletin. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to doctoral programs offered in the content areas of curriculum and instruction is selective. 
To be considered for regular admission to a doctoral degree program, an applicant must have 

(a) an academic record reflecting a superior undergraduate and graduate grade point average. Recently, 
students regularly admitted to doctoral programs in Curriculum and Instruction have obtained 
average GPAs of 3.65 or better (4.0 scale) for the last two years of undergraduate study and GPAs 
of 3.5 on previous graduate work; 
(b)results from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), a national standardized achievement/aptitude 
test predictive of the ability to complete a graduate program successfully; 

(c) three letters of recommendation sent to the department from professionals in the field of education 
who are qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study; 

(d) a letter of intent (describe reasons for pursuing a doctoral degree); also serves as a writing sample; 

(e) a professional resume; and 

(f) a copy of educator license. 



College of Education and Psychology | 121 



Admission Deadlines 

The department reviews qualified applicants for graduate work throughout the academic year. 
Applications adhering to tnese dates will receive notification on the specified date as mentioned. 

Semester Application Deadline Notification Date 



Fall 

Spring 

Summer 



First Monday in April 
First Monday in September 
First Monday in March 



First Monday in May 
First Monday in October 
First Monday in April 



Individuals who have submitted applications which qualified for admission, but who were not 
selected for enrollment in a given semester, are encouraged to request that their application remain 
active for future consideration. 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Admission to doctoral programs offered in the content area of curriculum and instruction is 
contingent on the approval of the Departmental Graduate Committee, the department chair, and the 
dean of the college. An applicant who fails to meet the above criteria for regular admission may be 
considered for conditional admission on an individual basis. 

Students accepted on a conditional basis MUST obtain a 3.50 GPA or better on their first nine (9) 
hours of specified coursework 600 level or higher or on all coursework taken while completing this 
9-hour requirement. It is the responsibility of the student to inform the department chair or graduate 
coordinator when conditional status is to be removed; additional requirements may be enforced 
based on deficiencies. 

All students must register for and complete the doctoral qualifying examination prior to the 
completion of their first twelve (12) hours of doctoral coursework. Based on the outcome of the 
qualifiers, students may have additional coursework assigned to their plan of study. Students must 
have a 3.0 GPA to graduate. 

Research Tool(s) 

For the Doctor of Education degree, proficiency in one language is required. In all cases, that 
language requirement shall be satisfied by successful completion of REF 761 and REF 762. The 
6 hours for REF 761 and REF 762 shall not be considered part of the 75-hour requirement for the 
doctorate. 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, proficiency in two languages, other than English (except in the 
case of students for whom English is not their native language), is required. In all cases, satisfaction 
of one of die two language requirements shall be met by successful completion of REF 761 and 
REF 762. An additional language proficiency must be demonstrated (see department graduate 
coordinator). The hours for REF 761 and REF 762 and other courses taken to satisfy the language 
proficiency requirement shall not be considered part of the 75-hour requirement for the doctorate. 

Graduate Core 

For die Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy degrees, all candidates enrolled in doctoral 
degree programs in curriculum, instruction, and special education are required to enroll in twenty- 
one (21) hours of core graduate coursework during the first two years of graduate coursework. 
These courses are identified as follows: CISE 800, CTSE 802, CISE 806, CISE 807, CISE 808, and 
CISE 809. 

Teaching Experience Requirement 

No student will be eligible to receive a doctoral degree until he or she has completed at least three 
years of teaching experience at a grade or in the area of disability appropriate for the degree. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 






, V : 



M 



122 J] College of Education and Psychology 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. The doctoral residency 
requirement for curriculum, instruction, and special education content requires twenty-four (24) 
continuous hours of graduate study on campus within two consecutive semesters (fall, spring), 
excluding summer. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Doctoral Degrees 

Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy in Education with Emphasis in 
Elementary Education 

Graduate Core: CISE 800, 802, 806, 807, 808, 809 

REF893* 3 

Elective (Select from CIE 600, 606, 704, 724, 725, 768 or CIR 705) 9 

CIE898 12 

CISE 800 3 

CISE 802 3 

CISE 806 3 

CISE 807 3 

CISE 808 3 

CISE 809 3 

*REF 761 and 762 are prerequisites for this course. 



Emphasis Requirements : 

In addition to the forty-two (42) semester hour core requirement listed above, students pursuing the 
IB?? doctoral degree with an emphasis in elementary education must complete at least twenty-one (21) 
Ipfcj hours beyond the master's degree in elementary education and a minimum of nine (9) hours in a 
jpllll related field(s) outside the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education. 

IplB Students desiring specialization in early childhood education must complete at least twenty-one (21) 
jp^lfl hours beyond the master's degree in early childhood and elementary education and a minimum of 
*« nine (9) hours in a related field(s) outside the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special 
Education. 

y§y Students desiring a specialization in reading must complete at least twenty-one (21) hours beyond 
the master's degree in reading and a minimum of nine (9) hours in a related field(s) outside of the 
Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education. 

Students seeking an emphasis in elementary education, with or without a specialization in either 
early childhood education or in reading, are to choose electives to complete a program consisting of 
a minimum of seventy-five (75) graduate semester hours beyond the master's degree. 

More than seventy-five (75) hours may be required in order to satisfy deficiencies which may exist 
in the student's background and preparation. 

Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy in Education with Emphasis in 
Secondary Education 

REF893* 3 

Elective (Select from CIS 542, 600, 707, 710, or CIR 754) 9 

cis 898 : :...: : :.: 12 

CISE 800 ! 3 

CISE 802 3 

CISE 806 3 

CISE 807 3 

CISE 808 3 

CISE 809 3 

*REF 761 and 762 are prerequisites for this course. 



College of Education and Psychology | 123 



Emphasis Requirements : 

The forty-two (42) semester hours of required coursework listed above serve as a core program for 
students pursuing a doctoial degree with an emphasis in secondary' education. The doctoral program 
consists of a minimum of seventy-five (75) graduate semester hours beyond the master's degree. 
More than seventy-five (75) hours may be required in order to satisfy deficiencies which may exist 
in the student's background and preparation. 

Of the total number of hours required for a doctoral degree with an emphasis in secondary 
education, thirty-three (33) semester hours of graduate credit must be taken in one of the following 
specialization or content areas: 



Biology 
Chemistry 
English 
Mathematics 



Reading 
Science 
Social Studies 



Doctoral Programs for Education with Emphasis in Special 
Education 



The doctoral program is comprehensive and places emphasis on teacher education, administration, 
research, and community services (with an internship required in at least one of these areas). The 
candidate is expected to develop competency in each of the above areas; the program will be 
based upon these as well as experience, background, and information gathered from written and 
oral qualifying examinations. Individualized program plans are formalized by candidates and the 
graduate coordinator following the successful completion of the qualifying examinations. 

The doctoral program requires a minimum of 54 hours past the master's degree and a residency 
which requires 12 semester hours to be completed during each of two consecutive semesters of fall 
and spring. Students may earn a Doctor of Education or a Doctor of Philosphy degree. 



Required courses include 
Teacher Education 
Administration 
Research 
Community Service 



CISE 800, 802, 806, 807, 808, 809 
SPE 770, 772 
SPE 791 
SPE 792 



Students should consult the departmental guidelines and the Admission Requirement Procedures 
section and the General Academic Requirements section of this Graduate Bulletin. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to doctoral programs offered in the Department of Curriculum, Instruction, and Special 
Education is selective. To be considered for regular admission to a doctoral degree program, an 
applicant must have 

(a) an academic record reflecting a superior graduate grade point average. Recently, students regularly 
admitted to doctoral programs in Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education have obtained 
average GPAs of 3.65 (4 scale) on previous graduate coursework; 

(b) results from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); 

(c) a writing sample consisting of a major paper, article, report, etc. 

(d) a letter of intent; 

(e) three letters of recommendation sent to the department from professionals in the field of education 
who are qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study; 

(f) a professional resume; and 

(g) a copy of license. 






H 



124 ]| College of Education and Psychology 



Admission Deadlines 

Semester Application Deadline Notification Date 

Fall First Monday in April First Monday in May 

Spring First Monday in September First Monday in October 

Summer First Monday in March First Monday in April 

Individuals who have submitted applications which qualified for admission, but who were not 
selected for enrollment in a given semester, are encouraged to request that their application remain 
active for future consideration. 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Admission to doctoral programs offered in the content area of curriculum, instruction, and special 
education is contingent on the approval of the Departmental Graduate Committee, the department 
chair, and the dean of the college. An applicant who fails to meet the above criteria for regular 
admission may be considered for conditional admission on an individual basis. Students accepted 
on a conditional basis MUST obtain a 3.50 GPA or better on their first nine (9) hours of specified 
coursework 600 level or higher on all coursework taken while completing this 9-hour requirement. 
It is the responsibility of the student to inform the department chair or graduate coordinator 
when conditional status is to be removed; additional requirements may be specified based on the 
applicant's deficiencies. 

All students must register for and complete the doctoral qualifying examination. Based on the 
outcome of the qualifiers, students may have additional coursework assigned to their plan of study. 
Students must have a 3.0 GPA to graduate. 

Research Tool(s) 

For the Doctor of Education degree, proficiency in one language is required. In all cases that 
language requirement shall be satisfied by. successful completion of REF 761 and REF 762. The 
six hours for REF 761 and REF 762 shall not be considered part of the 54-hour requirement for the 
doctorate. 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree, proficiency in two languages, other than English (except in the 
case of students for whom English is not their native language), is required. In all cases, satisfaction 
of one of the two language requirements shall be met by successful completion of REF 761 and 
REF 762. An additional language proficiency must be demonstrated (see department graduate 
coordinator). The hours for REF 761 and REF 762 and other courses taken to satisfy the language 
proficiency requirement shall not be considered part of the 54-hour requirement for the doctorate. 

In addition, each candidate will be expected to include intensive study in their area of emphasis, 
and a minimum of nine (9) semester hours of coursework from a department outside of curriculum, 
instruction, and special education. Twelve (12) hours of academic credit are designated for the 
dissertation (SPE 898). 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Stud}' Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at wAvw.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Residency 

Students must meet die residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. The doctoral residency 
requirement for special education content requires two (2) consecutive regular semesters (fall, spring) 
of graduate study on campus of (12) twelve hours each. 



College of Education and Psychology | 125 



Department of Educational Leadership and Research 

Gaylynn Parker, Ed.D., Intesim Chair 

118 College Drive #5027 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-5027 

(601) 266-4579 

Anderson, Hill, Kazelskis, Lee, Lipscomb, Lucas, Moulding, McNeese, Parker, Paul, Peters, Pierce, Rachal, 

Roberson, Shelley, Styron, Ward 

The Department of Educational Leadership and Research comprises courses and degree programs 
in educational administration and supervision, higher education, research and foundations, and 
adult education, and counseling. The programs in educational administration and supervision 
encompass the full range of administrative positions and lead to the master's degree, the specialist's 
degree, and the doctorate in education with an emphasis in educational administration. Programs at 
the master's degree level provide entry-level preparation in school principalship. Programs at the 
specialist's level provide entry level preparation in the school principalship and/or preparation for 
the superintendency, central administrative staff positions, and leadership roles in other institutional 
settings. In addition, the program at the doctoral level provides preparation for college teachers in 
educational administration. 

The research and foundations components of the Department of Educational Leadership and 
Research provide supportive services in teacher education. At the graduate level, these services 
are provided in the areas of educational foundations, and educational research. Also offered are the 
specialist's degree and the doctoral minor emphasizing educational research. 

The adult education component of the Department of Educational Leadership and Research offers 
programs of study which lead to four degrees in adult education: Master of Education (M.Ed.), 
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.), Doctor of Education (Ed.D.), and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) 
Through the completion of courses and degrees in those programs, students may enhance their 
understanding of adults as learners as well as the many means by which educational services are 
developed and delivered to adults. Academic preparation in adult education is dependent not only 
upon knowledge of adult education theory and practice but also upon knowledge from related areas 
of study, such as psychology, sociology, administration, and management. Consequently, the courses 
and degree programs often follow an interdisciplinary approach in preparing persons for roles of 
professional service to adults. Adult education majors are encouraged to enroll in professionally 
relevant courses in cognate fields. Students from other departments frequently find adult education 
courses to be valuable as electives or academic minors. 

The Counseling and Personnel Services component of the Department of Educational Leadership 
and Research consists of a Master of Education Degree in Counseling and Personnel Services. The 
Master of Education in Counseling and Personnel Services includes two Emphases, College Student 
Personnel Services and School Counseling for Licensed or Certified Teachers. The College Student 
Personnel Services Emphasis is designed to prepare graduates for college student personnel career 
opportunities in colleges, community colleges and universities. The School Counseling Emphasis 
for Licensed or Certified Teachers is designed to prepare graduates for K-12 school counselor 
employment opportunities. 

The following course patterns for the different levels set forth only the minimum core requirements, 
and the electives selected to suit individual needs and objectives must be chosen with the advice 
and approval of the student's major professor. Therefore, it is mandatory that the student consult 
early in his or her program, and frequently thereafter, with his or her major professor concerning the 
selection of courses and sequence in which these courses will be taken. 

Department Policies 

The following departmental policies are supplementary to the rules and regulations of the university 
and the Graduate School as set forth elsewhere in this Bulletin: 






126 College of Education and Psychology 



Programs and Courses in Educational Administration 
Master's Degree 

Master of Education Degree in Educational Administration 

The Master of Education program is a cohort structure beginning each summer. 

Contact the chair of the Department of Educational Leadership and Research for further details. 

Admission 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in educational leadership 
and research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college 
or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency. In addition, the Graduate 
Admissions Committees of the department recommend admittance only for those applicants whose 
academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and communication skills meet 
the challenging demands of graduate programs in educational leadership and research. In evaluating 
applications, the admission committees utilize separate criteria in each degree program offered. 
Admission to the Master of Education program in educational administration is further limited by 
the minimum and maximum number of students who can be accommodated in each cohort. 

Applications for admission to the master's program will be considered on an annual basis. Students 
will be admitted at the beginning of each summer session. Courses are taken in sequence, and no 
additional people will be admitted to a particular cohort after the beginning of the first term of the 
required curriculum. Individuals who drop out of a cohort to which they have been admitted will be 
considered for admission at the beginning of the next new cohort cycle. 

Prospective students are encouraged to apply as early as possible and are requested to apply prior to 
March 1. 



Required Criteria 



wM 






Supplementary Criteria 

other standardized test scores 



certification in a standard teaching field 
documentation of a minimum of three years 

of successful teaching experience 
letter of recommendation from immediate supervisor 

plus two additional letters from persons qualified 

to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study 
GPA on last 60 hours of undergraduate work; GPA in major 
GRE 

writing examination 
resume 
portfolio 
interview 
letter of intent 
reference checks 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

* Supplementary criteria may be submitted at the student's discretion or may be requested by the 
admissions committee. 

Application for Graduation 

Graduation is based upon 

1 . completion of an approved program of studies and required internship; 

2. satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination and portfolio; and 

3. a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA. • 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Education and Psychology | 127 



Curriculum 

Contact the Department of Educational Leadership and Research for academic requirements for the 
Master of Education in educational administration. 

Hours 

Block #1 The Landscape of Leadership 12 

Block #2 The Principal as Instructional Leader 12 

Block #3 The Pnncipal as Manager 12 

Internship 

EDA 636 8 



Specialist's Degrees 



Specialist in Education with Emphasis in Educational Administration and Higher 
Education Administration 

Admission 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in educational leadership 
and research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated with a master's 
degree from a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency. In 
addition, the Graduate Admissions Committees of the department recommend admittance only 
for those applicants whose academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and 
communication skills meet the challenging demands of graduate programs in educational leadership 
and research. In evaluating applications, the admission committees utilize separate criteria in each 
degree program offered. 

Required Criteria 

GRE other standardized test scores 

GPA on previous graduate GPA on last two years of 

work undergraduate work 

three letters of recommendation professional experience 

from persons qualified to assess the 

applicant's readiness for graduate 

study 
vita/resume 
portfolio 
interview 
writing sample 
letter of intent 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply 

Application for Graduation 

Graduation is based upon 

1. completion of an approved program of studies as determined by the student's committee which 
will consist of 36-39 semester hours of credit; 

2. satisfactory completion of the comprehensive examination; 

3. successful defense of the research project or completion of the field problem; and 

4. a minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/praduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 






128 



College of Education and Psychology 



Programs 

The specialist's degree students must complete the appropriate program depending on their 
certification in the K- 12 program. If not certified in administration, the building level program must 
be followed. If certified in administration, the district level program must be completed. 

Curriculum 

Building Level - Non-Administration Certified 

EDA 600, 620, 628, 700, 704, 706, 
708,710,736 



REF 602 

REF791AandREF791B 

District Level - Administration Certified 

Educational Administration (36-39 hrs) 

EDA 700, 702, 704, 706, 708,71 0, 

738, 755, 742, 800 
REF 791 A and REF 79 IB 
REF 602 



Higher Education Administration (36-39 hrs) 

EDA 71 1,712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 717, 719, 

736 
EDA 794 or EDA 798 
Electives — 6 or 9 hours in cognate areas 



Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 



Doctoral Degrees 

Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy in Education 

with Emphasis in Educational Administration 

Doctor of Education and Doctor of Philosophy in Higher Education Administration 

Admission 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in educational leadership 
and research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college 
or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency. In addition, the graduate 
admissions committees of the department recommend admittance only for those applicants whose 
academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and communication skills meet 
the challenging demands of graduate programs in educational leadership and research. In evaluating 
applications, the admission committees utilize separate criteria in each degree program offered. 

Required Criteria 



other standardized test scores 

interview 

GPA on last two years of undergraduate 

work 
professional experience 



GRE scores 

GPA on previous graduate work 

three letters of recommendation 

from people qualified to assess the 

applicant's readiness for graduate study 
vita/resume 
portfolio 
letter of intent 
writing sample 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Plan of Study 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Education and Psychology | 129 



Research Tool(s) 

Research tool(s) are required. Check with department chair for specific requirements. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Admission to candidacy should be submitted one semester prior to graduation and will be approved 
by die student's graduate committee upon 

1 . completion of an approved program of studies; 

2. satisfaction of the research tools/statistics requirement; 

3 . completion of an approved dissertation prospectus, 

4. completion of the comprehensive examination; and 

5. completion of the residency requirement. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Application for Graduation 

Graduation is based upon 

1 . meeting the departmental and college deadlines for receiving the completed dissertation; 

2. successful defense of the completed dissertation; 

3. a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA; and 

4. completion of residency requirement. 

Programs 

At the doctoral level, programs are provided in (1) educational administration and (2) higher 
education administration. The doctoral program requires a minimum of seventy-eight (78) semester 
hours beyond the master's degree inclusive of the dissertation and proficiency in statistics. The 
student's doctoral committee, appointed by the department, will approve the selection of required 
courses and electives and, in order to secure breadth and depth in the student's preparation program, 
may require more than the minimum number of hours of graduate credit. Each doctoral student will 
be required to participate in a variety of laboratory and field experiences. 

Curriculum 

Educational Administration Courses (Required/Recommended) Ed.D./Ph.D. 

EDA 600/700, 620/702, 628/704, 706/736/738, 710, 628/755/701, 708, 794, 791, 742, 708, 800, REF 

604 and REF791 A and REF 79 IB 
REF 602 
Plus Research/Statistics Courses and Cognates 

Students obtaining a doctoral degree in higher education administration may obtain an emphasis in 
the community college by taking the following 12 hour sequence: EDA 712, 717, 719, and 736. 

Higher Education Administration Courses (Required/Recommended) 

EDA 711, 712, 713, 714, 715, 716, 717, 718, 719, 736, 738, 777, 800, 814, 816 

REF 709, 889, SPE 803 

Plus Research/Statistics Courses and Cognates 



mm 



Master of Education in Counseling and Personnel Services 

Detailed programming brochures/guides may be located at the Department's Web site, http://www.usm. 
edu/edleadership/counselinghtm . 

Admission 

Admission to the graduate Program Emphases in Counseling and Personnel Services is selective, 
and multiple criteria are utilized. Criteria are specified below for each of the respective emphases. 



130 J! College of Education and Psychology 



College Student Personnel Services Emphasis 

Students are strongly encouraged to begin the program during the fall semester to start with a new 
cohort and follow the correct sequence of classes being offered. New admission for spring is limited. 
There are no new admits for the summer term. 

Required Criteria: 

1 . GRE General Test including writing section 

2. cumulative undergraduate GPA 

3. Three references from persons qualified to assess the applicant's academic ability 

4. completion of a personal portfolio (see departmental Web site for more details about portfolio) 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements: 

This emphasis requires thirty-three (33) hours of graduate coursework (no thesis is required for this 
degree). Twenty-seven (27) hours of coursework are required, and six (6) are electives. Successful 
completion of a comprehensive exam, and a 3.0 GPA are required to graduate. 

Hours 

Required courses: 

CPS 612, 615, 619, 639, 654, 739, 743, HE 716 or CPS 740, REF 601 27 

Electives 6 

Total Requirements 33 hours 

School Counseling for Licensed or Certified Teachers Emphasis 

Admission is for a summer cohort. Most courses are offered summer term only. 

Required Criteria: 

1 . A Class A Standard Teaching License Certificate and at least one year of fulltime teaching 
experience in any of grades K-12 (copy of teaching license required) 

2. GRE General Test 

Hpl 3 . GPA on last two years of undergraduate work 

fefel 4 - Three references from persons qualified to assess the applicant's academic ability 

5. Personal statement (essay) 

INI^f 6. Evidence of practicum site availability 

Hpl Hours 

Si 

frlO Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
fSfpfill Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

This emphasis requires 33-36 semester hours of prescribed coursework. Successful completion of a 
comprehensive exam and a 3.0 GPA are required for graduation. 

Required Courses 

CPS 610, 611, 612, 616, 617, 618, 651, 653 (6 hours), 711, REF 601 33 

Mississippi Residents Only:REF 607 3 

Total Requirements 33-36 hours 

Application for Graduation 

Graduation is based upon 

1 . completion of required coursework in respective program; 

2. satisfactory completion of comprehensive examination; 

3. satisfactory performance in the counseling practica; and 

4. a 3.0 GPA. 






mim 



College of Education and Psychology [ 131 



Programs in Educational Research 

Specialist's in Education: Educational Research Emphasis 

The program leading to the specialist's degree in education (Ed.S.) is designed to meet those 
goals listed under the master's degree program. The program is intended to serve as (1) a terminal 
program at the specialist's level for individuals not pursuing the doctoral degree and as (2) an 
advanced research program for individuals desiring specialization in research in addition to their 
major areas at the doctoral level. 

Admission 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in Educational Leadership 
and Research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college 
or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency. In addition, the Graduate 
Admissions Committees of the department recommend admittance only for those applicants whose 
academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and communication skills meet 
the challenging demands of graduate programs in educational leadership and research. In evaluating 
applications, the admission committees utilize separate criteria in each degree program offered. 



Required Criteria 

GRE scores 

GPA on previous graduate 
work 

three letters of recommendation 
from people qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study 



Supplementary Criteria* 

other standardized test scores 
interview 
vita/resume 
writing sample 
GPA on last two years of 
undergraduate work 



Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

* Supplementary materials may be submitted at the student's discretion or may be requested by the 
admissions committee. 



Application for Graduation 

Graduation is based upon 

1 . completion of required coursework; 

2. satisfactoiy completion of written and/or comprehensive examination; 

3. satisfactory completion of thesis or research problem; 

4. a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA; and 

5. completion of residency requirement 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 






Curriculum Requirements 

A student desiring to obtain a specialist's degree in educational research must possess a master's 
degree and complete a minimum of tliirty (30) semester hours of course work. Thirty (30) hours are 
required for the student who writes a thesis (REF 798) and thirty-three (33) hours for the student 
who conducts a field problem (REF 794). The student must have also completed, or be willing to 
complete, the following prerequisites or their equivalents: REF 601 and 602. 

The following eight courses (twenty-four (24) semester hours) are required Of each student: 

Hours 

REF 712, 720, 761, 762, 824, 830, 791-1, 791-2 24 

A student who chooses to write a thesis will complete two courses (six (6) semester hours) from 
among the following. A student who conducts a field problem will complete three courses (nine (9) 
semester hours). 
REF 770, 792, 893 6 or 9 

Each student must complete either REF 794 (Field Problems — 3 semester hours) or REF 798 
(Specialist Thesis— 6 semester hours). All REF 792 courses require advisors consent. 



132 i] College of Education and Psychology 



Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 
Doctoral Minor in Educational Research [Optional] 

Students majoring in a particular field or area at the doctoral level may also wish to pursue a doctoral 
minor in educational research. The objectives of the doctoral minor are to prepare persons to 

1. initiate or direct applied or institutional research in college, private or public agencies, and school 
systems; 

2. teach applied statistics and research methodology in institutions of higher learning; 

3. advise graduate and undergraduate students relative to the research process involved in theses, 
dissertations, and projects; 

4. utilize available computer packages for statistical and information processing; 

5. serve as consultants to agencies involved in research or evaluation. 

A minimum of twelve (12) semester hours is necessary in addition to REF 761 and REF 762 which 
are required for basic proficiency of all doctoral students in education. 

The six (6) graduate courses (eighteen (18) semester hours) from the following represent the 
requirements for the doctoral minor: 

Hours 

REF 712, 720, 761, 762, 824, 830 18 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin or by the department. 



Programs in Adult Education 



The adult education program, a component of the Department of Educational Leadership and 
Research, offers degrees in adult education at the master's, specialist's, and doctoral levels. 

Adult education programs, by nature interdisciplinary and flexible, offer individuals from diverse 
backgrounds opportunities for upgrading and building on professional experience. Such agencies 
include vocational-technical centers, the armed forces, health services, criminal justice and law 
enforcement programs, public school systems, junior and senior colleges, human service agencies, 
the Cooperative Extension Service, business and industrial organizations, and others. 

Admission to degree programs will be conducted in accordance with college and university policies 
(please refer to the Admissions Requirements and Procedures section of the Graduate Bulletin). In 
general, these procedures include the submission of application and credentials to the director of 
graduate admissions. Additionally, all degree applicants should send the program coordinator (a) 
a letter explaining the applicant's interest in and reasons for pursuing the degree and (b) a resume 
of academic and job-related experiences. The Admissions Review Committee will review all 
applications and recommend the appropriate actions. 

Admitted students will be assigned a temporary adviser until the student, with the concurrence of the 
program coordinator, selects a permanent adult education adviser. Doctoral students will also select 
a doctoral advisory committee composed of three additional faculty members, at least one of whom 
must be a member of the adult education faculty. Then, in accordance with departmental policy, 
students, in collaboration with their appointed advisers, will design programs of study which reflect 
their long term goals and interests. Basic admissions eligibility and graduation criteria are discussed 
in the sections which follow. 

Public School Teacher Certification 

The state of Mississippi does not offer certification for public school teachers in the area of adult 
education. Therefore, a Master of Education, Specialist in Education, Doctor of Education, or Doctor 
of Philosophy completed with a major in adult education will not result in meeting certification or 
recertification requirements for public school teaching at any level in Mississippi. 



College of Education and Psychology | 133 



Master of Education in Adult Education 

Admission 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in educational leadership 
and research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college 
or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency. In addition, the graduate 
admissions committees of the department recommend admittance only for those applicants whose 
academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and communication skills 
meet die challenging demands of graduate programs in Educational Leadership and Research. In 
evaluating applications, the admission committee utilizes separate criteria in each degree program 
offered. 

Required Criteria Supplementary Criteria* 

letter of application other standardized test scores 

GRE or MAT scores interview 

GPA on last two years of writing sample 

undergraduate work professional experience 

GPA on previous graduate work 
three letters of recommendation 
from people qualified to assess the 
applicant's academic ability 
vita/resume 
Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatesrudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Curriculum Requirements 

The Master of Education degree requires thirty (30) semester hours of graduate course work (no 
thesis is required for this degree). In addition to die eighteen (18) hours of courses specified below, 
twelve (12) hours of electives must also be taken. Eighteen (18) hours must be 600 level or higher. 

Required Courses 

Hours 

ADE 540, 576, 601, and 607 (ADE core) 12 

REF 601 (Introduction to Research) 3 

Electives 

Five ADE courses (may substitute REF 604 for one ADE) 15 

30 

To graduate, students must complete an approved thirty (30)-hour program of study with a 3.25 GPA 
and successfully complete a written comprehensive examination. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet die requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Specialist in Education in Adult Education 

Admission 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in Educational Leadership 
and Research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college 
or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency with both baccalaureate and 
master's degrees. In addition, the Graduate Admissions Committees of the department recommend 
admittance only for those applicants whose academic background, work experience, demonstrated 
leadership, and communication skills meet the challenging demands of graduate programs in 
Educational Leadership and Research. In evaluating applications, die admission committees utilize 
separate criteria in each degree program offered. 



134 || College of Education and Psychology 

Required Criteria Supplementary Criteria* 

letter of application other standardized test scores 

GRE or MAT scores interview 

GPA on previous master's degree writing sample 

three letters of recommendation GPA on last two years of undergraduate 
from people qualified to assess the work 

applicant's academic ability professional experience 

vita/resume 

*Supplementary material may be submitted at the student's discretion or may be 
requested by the admissions committee. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Curriculum Requirements 

This Specialist in Education degree requires thirty-three (33) semester hours of graduate work beyond 
the master's degree. Adult education specialist students must complete all ADE and REF courses (or 
their equivalents) specified for the Master of Education in Adult Education. Students are also required 
to complete an appropriate field study (ADE 794 or ADE 737). Altogether, students should complete 
twenty-one hours of adult education courses, six hours of REF courses, and six hours of graduate 
electives from relevant content areas related to the goals of the student. All courses must be approved 
by the student's adviser. A 3.25 GPA is required for graduation. 

To graduate, students must complete an approved thirty-three (33)-hour program of studies with a 
minimum 3.25 GPA, successfully complete a written comprehensive examination, and successfully 
complete an acceptable field study. 

Required Courses 

Hours 

ADE 540, 576, 601, 607 and either 737 or 794 15 

REF 601 (Introduction to Research) 3 

REF 604, or an eighth course in adult education 3 

Electives 

Two additional ADE courses 6 

Courses in degree-related areas 6 

33 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin or by die deparunent. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 



Doctor of Education (Ed.D) Education: Adult Education 
Emphasis 

The Ed.D. is designed for practitioners whose studies are applied to their field of practice. 
The Ed.D. is focused on the preparation of adult education professionals whose interests lie 
in practical application and effective practice. Thus the Ed.D allows students 12 hours of 
electives in a content area(s) of their choosing. 

Admission 



Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in Educational Leadership 
and Research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college or 
university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency and submission of the criteria 
indicated below. In addition, the graduate admissions committees of the department recommend 
admittance only for those applicants whose academic background, work experience, demonstrated 
leadership, and communication skills meet the challenging demands of graduate programs in 
Educational Leadership and Research. In evaluating applications, the admissions committees utilize 
separate criteria in each degree program offered. 



College of Education and Psychology | 135 



Required Criteria Supplementary Criteria* 

GRE scores other standardized test scores 

GPA on previous graduate interview 

work writing sample 

three letters of recommendation professional experience 

from persons qualified to assess the GPA on last two years of undergraduate 

applicant's readiness for graduate study work 
a letter of interst and professional goals 
vita/resume 

*Supplementary materials may be submitted at the student's discretion or may be 
requested by the admissions committee. Doctoral students in adult education will 
complete a number of required courses and electives, but the program is designed to 
allow intensive pursuit of other areas in which adult educators may have interest or 
professional goals. Accordingly, there are several possible tracks students may pursue 
in addition to the requirements common for all students. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Ed.D. Requirements 

Hours 

ADE Core: 540, 576, 601, 607 12 

ADE electives: ADE prefixed courses (May substitute REF 604 for 3 hours) 

(ONLY ONE FROM ADE 590, 692, 791, or 792; CANNOT INCLUDE ADE 797) 21 

REF Core: REF 601, 602, 761, 762, 889 15 

Open Electives: ADE electives encouraged 12 

Dissertation: ADE 898 12 

Total - 72 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 
These may be met through one of the following: 

• Two consecutive semesters of 12 hours each (12-12). 

• Three consecutive semesters of 9 hours each (9-9-9). 

• Four consecutive semesters of a minimum of 6 hours each, none arranged (6-6-6-6); or 
two semesters, one of which may be a summer semester, within a three-year period in which 
a minimum of 12 hours is taken in each of the two semesters and a minimum of 3 hours in 
each of the intervening semesters. 

• A comprehensive examination will be given near the end of course work. 

• A final GPA of 3.5 or higher is required 

Within this program, students may pursue related areas in which to specialize, or tracks. Students 
are not required to be in a track; they are not prescriptive. They are, however, suggestive of possible 
plans for individual doctoral programs. 

• Administrative and Managerial: For those interested in public sector and private 
sector administration. In addition to ADE 602 and 603, recommended course areas 
would include Business, Management, Marketing, and Educational Administration. 

• Adult Basic Education: For those interested in teaching and administering adult basic 
and secondary education. Recommended courses include ADE 541, 542, 545, 602, and 
related courses in Reading and English composition. 

• Career Specialization: For those interested in using their elective courses to pursue 
specific career interests, such as nursing, criminal justice, fine arts, liberal arts, 
business, technical fields, library services, etc. Many people in this track might 

be teachers or trainers in post-secondary institutions, health-related organizations, or 
business organizations. 



136 ji College of Education and Psychology 



• Gerontology: For those interested in the older adult. In addition to ADE 580 and 750, 
germane courses in psychology, sociology, social work, and counseling are 
recommended. 

The Dissertation 

Dissertation (12 hours): During the dissertation process, all students must complete twelve 
(12) hours of ADE 898, Dissertation. A minimum of three (3) credit hours of ADE 898 must be 
completed during the semester in which the dissertation is defended. The student submits three 
documents to a doctoral committee of four faculty: a pre-proposal, a proposal, and a completed 
dissertation. The last two are defended orally. A student applies for candidacy only after all degree 
requirements except the oral defense of the dissertation are completed . 

Program Planning 

During the first term, the student will schedule a program planning meeting with the Adult 
Education faculty. Comprehensive written examinations are prepared by doctoral committee 
members and are taken at or near the conclusion of course work. They are based on material from 
the overall program, including the books on the doctoral reading list. The committee may require 
an additional oral examination at its discretion. The Graduate Studies Office requires that doctoral 
degrees be completed within eight years. 

Graduation 

To complete the Ed.D. degree in Education- Adult Education emphasis, students must acheive 
a minimum 3.5 cumulative grade point average, complete all coursework, pass comprehensive 
examinations, and successfully complete and defend a dissertation. 



mP 

|ifeli v 

Hlfefa 



Doctor of Philosophy Education: Adult Education Emphasis 

The Ph.D. in adult education is a research-intensive degree designed for individuals who 
intend to pursue careers in which quantitative and qualitative research are expected. 



rr n •".:* ,t« Admission 



Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's graduate programs in Educational Leadership 
and Research is selective. Regular admission is contingent on having graduated from a college or 
university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting agency and submission of the criteria 
indicated below. In addition, the graduate admissions committees of the department recommend 
admittance only for those applicants whose academic background, work experience, demonstrated 
leadership, and communication skills meet the challenging demands of graduate programs in 
Educational Leadership and Research. In evaluating applications, the admissions committees utilize 
separate criteria in each degree program offered. 

Required Criteria Supplementary Criteria* 



GRE scores 

GPA on previous graduate 
work 

three letters of recommendation 
from persons qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study 

a letter of interst and professional goals 

vita/resume 



other standardized test scores 
interview 
writing sample 
professional experience 
GPA on last two years of undergraduate 
work 



* Supplementary materials may be submitted at the student's discretion or may be requested by the 
admissions committee. Doctoral students in adult education will complete a number of required 
courses and electives, but the program is designed to allow intensive pursuit of other areas in which 
adult educators may have interest or professional goals. Accordingly, there are several possible 
tracks students may pursue in addition to the requirements common for all students. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Education and Psychology | 137 

Ph.D. Requirements 

Hours 

ADE Core: 540,576,601,607 12 

ADE electives: ADE prefixed courses (May substitute REF 604 for 3 hours) 

(ONLY ONE FROM ADE 590, 692, 791, or 792; CANNOT INCLUDE ADE 797) 21 

REF Core: REF 601, 602, 761, 762, 824, 830, and 889 21 

REF Electives: REF 792* (Requires ADE instructor approval), 712, 720, 770 6 

Dissertation: ADE 898 12 

Total - 72 



Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 
These may be met through one of the following: 

• Two consecutive semesters of 12 hours each (12-12). 

• Three consecutive semesters of 9 hours each (9-9-9). 

• Four consecutive semesters of a minimum of 6 hours each, none arranged (6-6-6-6), or 
two semesters, one of which may be a summer semester, within a three-year period in which 
a minimum of 12 hours is taken in each of the two semesters and a minimum of 3 hours in 
each of the intervening semesters. 

• A comprehensive examination will be given near the end of course work. 

• A final GPA of 3.5 or higher is required. 

The Dissertation 

During the dissertation process, all students must complete twelve (12) hours of ADE 898, 
Dissertation. A minimum of three (3) credit hours of ADE 898 must be completed during the 
semester in which the dissertation is defended. The student submits three documents to a doctoral 
committee of four faculty: a pre-proposal, a proposal, and a completed dissertation. The last two are 
defended orally. A student applies for candidacy only after all degree requirements except the oral 
defense of the dissertation are completed . 

Program Planning 

During the first term, the student will schedule a program planning meeting with the Adult 
Education faculty. Comprehensive written examinations are prepared by doctoral committee 
members and are taken at or near the conclusion of course work. They are based on material from 
the overall program, including the books on the doctoral reading list. The committee may require 
an additional oral examination at its discretion. The Graduate Studies Office requires that doctoral 
degrees be completed within eight years. 

Graduation 

To complete the Ph.D. degree in Education: Adult Education emphasis, students must acheive 
a minimum 3.5 cumulative grade point average, complete all coursework, pass comprehensive 
examinations, and successfully complete and defend a dissertation. 



138 I College of Education and Psychology 



|sfc 



School of Library and Information Science 

Melanie J. Norton, Ph.D., Director 

118 College Drive #5146 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-5146 

(601) 266-4228 

Bomhold, Cissell, Haynes, Higgins, Norton, Rodriguez-Buckingham, Welsh 

The School of Library and Information Science offers a course of study leading to a Master of 
Library and Information Science degree. Since the first master's degree in library science was 
awarded in 1965, the program has continued to grow and develop into a comprehensive instructional 
program for all students who plan to become information professionals. The program prepares 
professional librarians in public, school, academic, or special libraries as well as other information 
environments. For the general university graduate student, the school offers a variety of courses 
for acquiring skills in the use of library and other information resources as research tools. Finally, 
the school performs a vital role in the continuing development and expansion of library services at 
all levels in the state of Mississippi as well as providing continuing education for state practicing 
librarians. The school provides various forms of instructional delivery in order to serve the entire 
state and students in other areas: face-to-face instruction, Internet-based courses, hybrid modes, and 
interactive video. 

The graduate curriculum in library and information science provides instruction in the following 
areas of librarianship: information science; reference; cataloging and classification; selection and 
acquisition; administration; bibliography; nonprint media; history of the book, libraries, printing and 
publishing; and library programs for children and youth. 

Providing prospective librarians with professional knowledge and skills for effective library service, 
however, is not the only objective of the school. The faculty believes that professional education 
should also be concerned with fostering those attitudes and understandings which will help students 
develop an appreciation of the changing role of the library in society. The library profession will 
flourish only as students are prepared to participate intelligently in the process of relating library 
services to the larger social and cultural needs of contemporary society. 

Accreditation 

The Master of Library and Information Science degree is accredited by the American Library 
Association. The school is also an institutional member of the American Library Association and 
the Association for Library and Information Science Education. The school is active in the Special 
Libraries Association, the Southeastern Library Association, the Mississippi Library Association, 
and the Society of Mississippi Archivists. 

Mission of the Master's Program in Library and Information Science 

The mission of the master's of library and information science program is to prepare qualified 
individuals for professional roles in libraries and other information environments with appropriate 
knowledge and skills to serve the information needs of their communities. 



Admission Requirements 

A graduate student in the School of Library and Information Science must meet the general 
requirements for admission to the university graduate program as outlined elsewhere in this Bulletin. 
Application forms for admission to the graduate program must be submitted to the Graduate 
Admissions Office of the university. 

Applications for admission are evaluated by a combination of the following criteria: 

Undergraduate Record - Recently, students qualifying for regular admission to the master's 
program have had a 3.0 (4.0 scale) grade point average for the last two years of undergraduate 
study. For conditional admission, die School of Library and Information Science adheres to the 
policies of die Graduate School as stated in this Bulletin. 

Graduate Record Examination - The student must submit GRE scores. 

Letters of Recommendation - Three letters of recommendation by professionals in the field 
assessing the readiness of the applicant for graduate work must be submitted to the School of 
Library and Information Science. 



College of Education and Psychology j 139 



Personal Questionnaire - The school requires the submission of a personal questionnaire/ 
application 

Personal Interviews - Personal interviews with applicants will be conducted whenever possible. 

Letter of Application - Letter of application discussing the development of the student's interest 
in library and information science, the types of libraries they are interested in and statements 
about the student's potential contributions to the field; a minimum of 1 ,000 words are required. 

Resume 

Forms for the letters of recommendation and the personal questionnaire may be obtained by request 
from the School of Library and Information Science and are available on the school's Web site. 

Master of Library and Information Science Degree Program 

Candidates for the Master of Library and Information Science (M.L.I.S.) degree must earn a 
minimum of thirty-nine (39) semester hours of credit with a 3.0 cumulative GPA. Eighteen (18) of 
these hours must be at the 600 level of courses. As many as six (6) hours may be selected from the 
offerings of other departments within the university with approval of the director. A total of no more 
than six (6) semester hours of transfer work may be applied toward the degree. A total of no more 
than nine (9) semester hours of combined transfer work and nondegree work may be applied toward 
the degree. Students must pass a comprehensive exam and complete a master's proposal and project 
(LIS 695) and have a 3.0 GPA with no more than one "C" or lower to graduate. 

The program of study for students will be individualized, taking into consideration previous 
academic backgrounds, experience, and career objectives. All programs of study must be planned 
with the counsel of a faculty adviser and approved by the director of the School of Library and 
Information Science. Visit the SLIS Graduate Handbook and Policy manual on the SLIS Web site. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

I. Master of Library and Information Science Degree Requirements 

Required courses (21 hours: LIS 501, 505, 511, 605, 636, 651, 668) 
Electives (15 hours) at least 3 hours at 600 level 
Comprehensive Exam 
Master's project (3 hours: LIS 695) 

If near equivalences of any of the above required courses were taken on the graduate level at an 
ALA accredited institution with a grade of B or above, other electives may be substituted with 
permission of the director. 



II. Course Requirements for School Library-Media Specialist Licensure at the 
Master's Level 

Students who plan to use the master's degree in library and information science for Class-AA 
licensure should complete the following courses in addition to the required courses, master's project 
and comprehensive exam listed above: 
LIS 508, 516, 517, 518, 525, 591 

The following professional education courses must be completed to satisfy licensure requirements in 
the state of Mississippi: REF 601 and REF 607. 

Students seeking licensure at the master's level are also advised that they will be required to 
complete more than 39 hours to meet all degree and licensure requirements, especially if they do 
not hold Class-A licensure in library and information science. Students should see their adviser or 
the director of the School of Library and Information Science for further information concerning 
licensure requirements. 



140 (| College of Education and Psychology 



III. Dual Master's Degree in History and Library and Information Science 

The History Department and the School of Library and Information Science offer a dual master's 
degree program leading to the Master of Arts in History and the Master of Library and Information 
Science degrees. Students must be admitted separately to each program. The total number of hours 
required for bodi programs is 60 - 30 for the Master of Library and Information Science and 30 for 
the Master of Arts in History. 

Students in the combined program must complete the following requirements: 

1 . thirty (30) hours in history ( 1 8 hours at the 600 level) 

2. thirty (30) hours in library and information science ( 1 8 hours at the 600 level) 

The following are required courses: 
LIS 501, 505, 51 1,605, and 636; 
LIS 651 or LIS 647; 
LIS 631 or 638 or 646 or 649 or 666; 
LIS electives (6 hours); and 
LIS 691 which will confer three (3) of the 6 hour thesis requirement 

3. a reading knowledge of one foreign language 

4. a thesis that confers six (6) hours of the minimum hourly requirement for the history component 

5. a 3.0 GPA to graduate 

A comprehensive oral examination, administered by a three-member committee representing both 
disciplines, is given after satisfactory completion of the coursework and thesis. 

The history requirements in this program are covered in the Department of History section of this 
Bulletin. 

IV. Dual Master's Degree in Anthropology and Library and Information Science 

|p||fe The Department of Anthropology and Sociology and the School of Library and Information Science 
||||H offer a dual master's degree program leading to the Master of Arts in Anthropology and the Master 
jjf§f~j of Library and Information Science degrees. Students must be admitted separately to each program. 

The total number of hours required for both programs is 60; 30 for the Master of Library and 

Information Science and 30 for the Master of Arts in Anthropology. 



im 



:».¥:-■-■ , 

m 



-■■■■ 



Students in the combined program must complete the following requirements: 



4f~f 1 . thirty (30) hours in anthropology ( 1 8 hours at the 600 level) 

2. thirty (30) hours in library and information science (1 8 hours at the 600 level); the following are 
required courses: LIS 501, 505, 511, 605, 636, 651, 666, and 691 (3 hours) 

3. proficiency in one foreign language (see this Bulletin) or two semesters (6 hours) of graduate-level 
quantitative research methods 

4. a comprehensive exam in anthropology 

5. a thesis (3 hrs of 698 in anthropology) 

6. a 3.0 GPA to graduate 

The anthropology requirements in this program are covered in the Department of Anthropology and 
Sociology section of this Bulletin. 

V. Dual Master's Degree in Political Science and Library and Information Science 

The Department of Political Science and the School of Library and Information Science offer a 
dual master's program leading to the Master of Arts in Political Science and the Master of Library 
and Information Science degrees. Students must be admitted separately to each program. The total 
number of hours required for both programs is 60, including 3 hours of thesis in each program - 30 
hours for the Master of Library and Information Science and 30 hours for the Master of Arts in 
Political Science. Students must satisfy the requirements of both degrees before the degrees will be 
awarded and have a 3.0 GPA to graduate. 



College of Education and Psychology j 141 

Students in the combined program must complete the following requirements: 

Library and Information Science 

Required: 

LIS 501 Reference Resources and Services (3 hrs) 

LIS 505 Cataloging and Classification (3 hrs) 

LIS 511 Collection Development and Management (3 hrs) 

LIS 540 Information Etiiics (3 hrs) 

LIS 605 Library Management (3 hrs) 

LIS 636 Information: The Library and Society (3 hrs) 

LIS 651 Introduction to Information Science (3 hrs) 

LIS 691 Research in Library Science (3 hrs) 

Electives: 2 courses in LIS, 3 hours each, chosen in consultation with an academic adviser 
Strongly recommended is at least one practicum (LIS 689, 3 hours). 
Comprehensive Exam 

Political Science 

PS 511 Research in Political Science (3 hrs) 

PS 698 Thesis (3 hrs) 

24 hours in political science, chosen in consultation with the director of graduate studies in three of 

the following areas: 

Public Administration- PS 571, 572, 573, 574, 770 

Public Law- PS 580, 581 , 582, 584, 585, 588, 589, 781 

Political Theory and Methodology- PS 511, 512, 520, 521, 526, 721 

American Government and Politics- PS 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, 509, 700 

International Relations- PS 531, 532, 535, 730, 731 

Comparative Government and Politics- PS 550, 552, 556, 557, 558, 750 

Specialist in Library and Information Science Degree Program 

The Specialist in Library and Information Science (S.L.I.S.) advanced degree will provide the 
opportunity for practitioners to meet specific requirements in their professional areas, earn AAA w^^g 
school library media licensure, participate in continuing education activities, and specialize in I 
particular areas of librarianship. Library and information science courses will include information F 
technologies in a variety of information environments, advanced management seminars, and H 
advanced research design. Specific courses of study are planned to meet the needs of individual p 
students in consultation with faculty advisers and the director. All students in the Specialist in 
Library and Information Science program are required to complete a six-hour specialist field 
problem (LIS 794) or specialist thesis (LIS 798). All students must pass an oral defense of their 
proposal and the completed field problem or thesis before a committee. Students completing 
the specialist thesis (LIS 798) must present a thesis that conforms to the policies, format, and 
conventions described in the Graduate Studies Office Student Manual for Preparing Theses and !.' 
Dissertations. Copies of the manual may be obtained in the Office of Graduate Studies or from the 
Graduate Studies Web site. 

Summer term and transfer credit information that applies to the master's program also applies to the 
specialist's program. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the general requirements for admission to the university's specialist's degree 
programs as outlined in this Bulletin. Eligibility requirements for applicants to the specialist's degree 
program in library and information science are as follows: 

Applicant must have a master's degree in library and information science, a master's degree in 
library and information science with an AA license, or a Master of Education degree with an 
AAlieense. (For students with a Master of Education degree with an AA license, additional 
coursework is required). 

Applicant must have two (2) years of professional employment after earning the master's degree. 
(This requirement will be considered for waiver under specific circumstances. Contact the director 
of the School of Library and Information Science.) 



: 



142 | College of Education and Psychology 



Applications for admission to the Specialist in Library and Information Science degree program are 
evaluated by a combination of the following factors: 

Graduate record - minimum 3.25 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) on all graduate work 

Graduate Record Examination scores 

Letters of Recommendation - Three letters of recommendation by professionals in the field or from 
the applicant's college instructors assessing the applicant's readiness for advanced graduate work 
must be submitted to the School of Library and Information Science. 

Personal Questionnaire - The school requires the submission of a personal questionnaire/ 
application. 

Letter of Application - Letter of application explaining interest in the program and area of focus for 
research, minimum of 1,000 words 

Personal Interviews - Personal interviews with applicants will be conducted whenever possible. 

Resume 

The director of the School of Library and Information Science, the dean of the College of Education 
and Psychology and the Office of Graduate Studies must be satisfied that the applicant shows 
promise of satisfying advanced graduate degree requirements. 

Degree Requirements: Specialist in Library and Information Science 

Students entering the specialist's program with a Master of Library and Information Science degree 
must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Thirty-six (36) semester hours in library and information science, with the option to include twelve 
(12) hours from related departments, such as public administration, political science, educational 
leadership, communications, and marketing: 

Thirtv (30) hours selected from the following recommended courses: 

LIS 506, 508, 516, 517, 518, 525, 540, 545, 557, 558, 560, 591, 641, 653, 654, 655, 656 

670,and 675 

Six (6) hours of a specialist field project (LIS 794) or thesis (LIS 798) 

2. Oral defense of the proposal and the completed specialist field project or thesis to a committee and 
comprehensive exam. 

3 Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

4. A 3.0 GPA to graduate. 

Degree Requirements for Specialist in Library and Information Science with Emphasis in 
School Library Media Specialist Licensure at the AAA Level 

Students entering the specialist's program with a Master of Library and Information Science degree 
with an AA license must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Thirty-six (36) semester hours of coursework: 

Eighteen (18) hours of elective courses in library and information science 
Twelve (12) hours of recommended education courses (consult adviser) 
Six (6) hours of a specialist field project (LIS 794) or thesis (LIS 798) 

2. Oral defense of the proposal; and of the completed specialist field project or thesis to a committee; 
and comprehensive exam 

3. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

4. A 3.0 GPA to graduate. 



College of Education and Psychology | 143 



Students entering the specialist's program with a Master of Education degree with an AA license 
must complete the following requirements: 

1 . Forty- five (45) semester hours of coursework: 

Twenty-one (21) hours of prerequisite courses: LIS 501, 505, 511, 605, 636, 651, 668 

Eighteen (18) hours of elective courses in library and information science, with an option to 
substitute twelve (12) hours of education courses for the recommended LIS courses (consult 
adviser) 

Six (6) hours of a specialist field project (LIS 794) or thesis (LIS 798) 

2. Oral defense of the proposal; and of the completed specialist field project or thesis to a committee, 
and comprehensive exam 

3. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

4. A 3.0 to graduate. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usni.edu/graduatcstudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



Department of Psychology 



Stan A. Kuczaj, H, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5025 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-5025 

(601)266-4177 

Agler-Lin, Alford, Amau, A ten, C. Barry, T. Barry, Berman, Bullock, Dahlen, Dufrene, Echevarria, Goggin, 

Green, Greer, Harsh, Jordan, Koeppel, Kuczaj, Leach, Lyddon, Madson, Marcus, Marsee, McCoy, Nicholson, 

Olmi, Sterling-Turner, Stretch, Tingstrom, Vonk, Wagner, Watson, Wesley, Zeigler-Hill 

The Department of Psychology offers graduate programs at the master's and doctoral level. Except 
for the master's degree in counseling psychology (see below), the department admits to its graduate 
programs only those students interested in continuing through to the doctorate. Students desiring a 
master's in psychology only need not apply as we do not offer a terminal master's degree. 

The master's degree in counseling psychology (M.S.) prepares entry-level counselor personnel for 
service delivery roles in community agency settings. The Master of Science program in counseling 
psychology also provides a track for students who wish to pursue advanced graduate study. 

The department's Doctor of Philosophy programs in clinical, counseling, and school psychology 
are based on the scientist-practitioner training model which integrates scientific and professional 
components at all stages of training, preparing graduates for teaching, research, and practice roles in 
health service, governmental, educational, business/industrial, and academic settings. The Doctor of 
Philosophy program in experimental psychology prepares graduates for teaching and research roles 
in academic institutions and specialized research programs. 

At the doctoral level, programs in clinical, counseling, and school psychology are fully accredited 
by the American Psychological Association (APA). In addition, the doctoral program in school 
psychology is accredited by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). At the 
master's level, the program in counseling psychology is accredited by the Council for Accreditation 
of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) by the American Counseling 
Association. Since program requirements, application material, and curricula may vary from one 
program to the next, program brochures should be accessed online or requested from the department 
if detailed information is needed. 




144 j| College of Education and Psychology 



■»m& 



Master's Degree Programs 

Students are admitted into one of four specialty tracks leading to the doctorate (clinical, counseling, 
experimental, school) based on an assessment of their potential to successfully complete a doctoral 
program. Hence, admissions requirements are essentially the same as those as listed for the Doctor 
of Philosophy in psychology (see description under Doctor of Philosophy in psychology). Some 
students initially seek a doctoral degree but may, at some point, opt to terminate with a master's 
degree and typically complete a program leading to a Master of Science degree in Psychology. 
Regardless, the completion of any master's degree does not guarantee admission to advanced 
doctoral study in one of the Doctor of Philosophy programs offered by the department. 

Students are admitted to the Master of Science in counseling psychology based upon the student's 
previous academic record, scores on admission tests, and recommendations. Admission is selective; 
the faculty selects the best candidates from the applicant pool. The following tests are required for 
the respective master's programs: 

Master of Science in Counseling Psychology - Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

The admissions committee takes into account factors such as test scores, undergraduate grade point 
average, and letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for 
graduate study in making admissions decisions. 

Members of underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
Avww.usm.edu/graduatestudics - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 



Curricula: Master of Arts and Master of Science in Psychology 

Common Requirements for the Master of Arts and Master of Science Degrees 

with a Major in Psychology 

Hours 

Departmental Courses: 

Research Design & Analysis area: PSY661, 662,663 9 

Psychological Foundations area: completion of 3 of the following 4 content areas 9 

Biological area: PSY 624 or PSY 726 

Cognitive area: PSY 621 or PSY 722 

Social area: PSY 750 or PSY 655 

Individual Differences and Life Span Development area: PSY 635 or PSY 679 
Electives 14 

All choices between core courses as well as selection of elective courses must be approved by the 
student's major adviser and emphasis area director. 

Master's comprehensive examination requirements are described in the General Academic 
Requirements section of this Bulletin. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Additional Requirements for the Master of Arts 

Hours 

Departmental Courses: 

Master's Thesis: PSY 698 6 

A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Note: Students completing the Master of Science degree in preparation for doctoral study must 
complete a master's thesis in addition to the requirements listed under Common Requirements 
for Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees. Completion of the Master of Arts or Master of 
Science degree with thesis does not guarantee admission to the doctoral degree program. 



College of Education and Psychology | 145 



Curriculum: Master of Science in Counseling Psychology: Community Counseling 
Emphasis (Hattiesburg campus only) 

The Master of Science in Counseling Psychology is designed to accommodate the needs of students 
who plan to seek employment in human services agencies. Research and statistics courses are 
available for those students who may wish to prepare for doctoral study. The program is accredited 
under the Community Counseling area by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related 
Educational Programs. The program is offered only on a full-time enrollment basis. New students 
are admitted for the fall semester only. Applications received by March 1st will receive a full 
review. 

Master's comprehensive examination requirements are described in the General Academic 
Requirements section of this Bulletin. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Hours 

Required Core Courses and Practica 

Foundations: PSY 613 and 679 or 717 >, 6 

PSY614, 630, 650, 652, 710, 712, 713, 714, 720, 727, 738, 762 36 

Research Tools: PS Y 659 3 

Internship: PSY 796 6 

Environmental/Specialized Studies 9 

Total Requirements 60 hours 

Note: Course planning is undertaken with (he backgrounds and needs of students in mind. The curriculum may be 
slightly modified to meet individual needs of students (with approval of adviser). Detailed curriculum guides are 
available upon request. 

Doctoral Degree Programs 

Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology 

The department offers the Doctor of Philosophy in psychology in four emphasis areas: clinical, 
counseling, experimental, and school psychology. 

These doctoral emphasis areas are designed to ensure that students receive strong preparation in the 
research and theoretical literature of psychology as an experimental behavioral science. 

Students are admitted to one of these programs after completing a master's degree (M.A.) in psychology 
as described in the section on master's degrees. Students who apply to a doctoral program and have not 
completed such a master's degree must do so at Southern Miss en route toward their doctorate. As stated 
in the master's degree program section, completion of a master's degree does not guarantee admission 
to one of the doctoral programs. Admission to a doctoral program requires completion of the master's 
degree AND approval by the program faculty and the department chair. Applicants are judged on the 
basis of prior academic record, GRE scores, three letters of recommendation from persons qualified 
to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study, and evidence of creative scholarship. Applicants 
are expected to have completed appropriate undergraduate foundation courses in psychology (e.g., 
statistics, experimental, and history and systems). A student may be invited to come to campus for a 
personal interview as part of the application process. The department typically receives applications 
from a larger number of qualified applicants than it can enroll. Prospective students should specify their 
intended emphasis area at time of application. Brochures describing each of these are available from 
the department or online. New students are admitted only for fall semester. Applications received by 
January 15 will receive a full review. All students interested in applying for admission to the program 
are encouraged to contact the department prior to submitting their applications. 

The Department of Psychology values diversity, and members of underrepresented groups are 
strongly encouraged to apply. Additionally, whereas participation in on-campus admissions seminars 
and interviews is highly recommended for applicants who enter the final selection pool, alternative 
arrangements may be requested through the director of training for those individuals who are unable 
to travel to Hattiesburg. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



146 || College of Education and Psychology 

Common Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology 
Research Tool(s) 

Research tool(s) are required. Check with department chair for specific requirements. 

Doctoral qualifying exams may be required. Doctoral comprehensive exams are required. Check 
with training directors for information on these exams. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 
Departmental Courses: 

PSY718 3 

PSY898 12 

Psychological Foundations: completion of the remaining 1 of the following 

4 content areas: (3 content areas are required for Southern Miss master's degree; students who enter 
Southern Miss with a master's degree must complete all 4 content areas for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree 3 

Biological area: PSY 624 or PSY 726 

Cognitive area: PSY 621 or PSY 722 

Social area: PSY 750 or PSY 655 

Individual Differences and Life Span Development area: PSY 635 or PSY 679 
NOTE: All choices between core courses as well as selection of elective courses must be approved by the 
student's major adviser and the emphasis area director of training. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Experimental Psychology 

In addition to the requirements listed under common requirements for the doctor of philosophy 
degree, the student must take the following. 

Hours 

Departmental Courses: 

PSY 701 (1 hour), 702; 728 (9 hours) 13 

Electives 27 



n 



NOTE: All electives must be approved by the student's major adviser and emphasis area director of training. 
Requirements for an Emphasis in Clinical Psychology 

In addition to the requirements listed under common requirements for the doctor of philosophy 
degree, the student must take the following: 

Psychological Foundations: Hours 

Departmental Master's Core 
Professional Core: 

PSY 607, 613, 701 7 

Additional Research Design and Analysis 

PSY 768, 794 (3 hours) 6 

Clinical Core: 
PSY 640 or 740, 641, 736, 748, 780, 734, 742, 777 24 

Practica, Extemships, and Internship: 

PSY 782 (minimum 5 semesters and 14 hours), 881 (3 hours) 17 

Electives 13 



NOTE We offer generalist training in clinical psychology with elective concentrations. Regardless of 
concentration, students in the clinical track are required to take PSY 621, 624, 679, 722, and 750. Upon 
admission to the program, students choose a concentration in either Adult Clinical or Child Clinical. Adult 
Clinical : Students electing the Adult Clinical concentration will be assigned an Adult Clinical research mentor, 
have a minimum 3 semesters of Adult Clinical practicum training, and complete Adult Clinical coursework 
earlier in sequence. They are also required to complete PSY 635, PSY 740, and relevant electives. Child . 
Clinical : Students electing the Child Clinical concentration will be assigned a Child Clinical research mentor, 
have a minimum 3 semesters of Child Clinical practicum training, complete Child Clinical coursework earlier 
in sequence, complete PSY 640, and relevant electives. 



College of Education and Psychology | 147 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Counseling Psychology 

In addition to the requirements listed under common requirements for the doctor of philosophy 
degree, the student must take the following: 

Hours 

Psychological Foundations: 

Departmental master's core and PSY 613 
Professional Core: 

PSY 607; 614, 641, 701, 710, 712 or 780, 713, 714, 740 or 835, 81 1, 

836, and 870 (6 credit hours) 39 

Practica, Externships, and Internship: 

PSY 650, 652, 762, 763, 786 or 835, 796 or 840, 835 or 840, 860 or 835, 883 (3 hours) 24-27 

Research Design and Analysis. 

Department master's core and PSY 791 and 850 or REF 893 13-16 

NOTE: Elective areas include courses in child/family interventions, behavioral medicine/health 
psychology,and gerontology. Electives must be approved by die student's major adviser and the emphasis 
area director of training. 

Requirements for an Emphasis in School Psychology 

In addition to the requirements listed under common requirements for the doctor of philosophy 
degree, the student must take the following: 

Hours 

Departmental Courses: 
PSY 607, 613, 635 or 679 (choose the one not taken at master's level), 
642, 643, 671 (3 hours), 691 (9 hours), 693 (2 hours), 621 or 722 (choose the one 
not taken at master's level). 750 or 655, 771 (24 hours); 791 (6 hours), 772, 773, 
774, 775, 777, 793 (6 hours), 880 (3 hours) 89 

Electives 12 



NOTE: All electives must be approved by the student's major adviser and the emphasis area director of 
training. The selection of an internship must conform to NASP and CDSPP standards. 

Note: Students completing the doctoral degree program with an emphasis in School Psychology 
will be eligible to apply for Mississippi AAAA school psychologist licensure. Each student, in 
consultation with the major professor, should identify any additional requirements necessary for 
licensure in the state in which the student plans to work. 

Department of Technology Education 

Edward C. Maim, D.Ed., Chair 

118 College Drive #5036 

Hattiesburg MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4446 

Beedle, Davis, Fisher, Hartseil, Juneau, Mann, Rouse, Wang, Yuen 

The Department of Technology Education offers graduate programs leading to the master of science 
degree: Master of Science in Technology Education with an emphasis in Business Technology 
Education or Technical and Occupational Education and a Master of Science in Instructional 
Technology. 

The purpose of the Master of Science in Technology Education is to provide teachers of business, 
industrial, technical, and vocational subjects with post-baccalaureate coursework designed to serve 
as a foundation for professional development, career advancement, or further graduate study. 

The purpose of the Master of Science in Instructional Technology is to provide students with a strong 
theoretical base and practical hands-on experience in the design, development, implementation, 
management, and evaluation of leading-edge educational technologies. 

Mississippi teachers holding the appropriate Class-A teaching license may qualify for a Class-AA 
license upon successful completion of one of these programs and approval of the Office of Educator 
Licensure, Mississippi Department of Education. 



•cm 
m 

pip 
SpsSL 



148 j College of Education and Psychology 



Master's Programs 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the master's programs offered in the Department of Technology Education is selective. 
Applications for admission to the master's programs will be considered on a semester basis. To be 
considered for regular admission to one of the master's degree programs, an applicant must submit 
the following: 

( 1 ) A completed application to the Office of Graduate Studies; 

(2) Evidence of graduation from a college or university accredited by a recognized regional 
accrediting agency with an undergraduate grade point average reflecting the ability to do graduate 
work. Official transcripts are to be forwarded to the Office of Graduate Studies; 

(3) Scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT) predictive 
of the ability to successfully complete the graduate program. Test scores are to be forwarded to the 
Office of Graduate Studies; 

(4) A letter of intent describing reasons for pursuing a master's degree in the specific program area. 
The letter of intent is to be forwarded directly to the Chair of the Department of Technology 
Education; 

(5) A professional resume. The resume is to be forwarded directly to the Chair of the Department of 
Technology Education, 

(6) A minimum of three letters of recommendation from individuals qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness to successfully complete the specific graduate program to which the applicant is applying. 
The letters of recommendation are to be forwarded directly to die Chair of the Department of 
Technology Education; 

(7) Please check the department Web site at http://www.usm. edu/technologyeduation/ for any 
program specific admission requirements. 

The Graduate Admissions Committee for each program will recommend regular admittance only for 
those applicants whose academic backgrounds, career experiences, professional dispositions, and 
communication skills meet the challenging demands of graduate education. 

An applicant who fails to meet the criteria for regular admission may be considered for and gain 
conditional admission upon the recommendation of the department chair and dean of the college. 
Such students must make grades of B or better on the first nine (9) hours of graduate program 
coursework in order to qualify for regular admission. It is the responsibility of the student to inform 
his/her advisor which additional requirements have been met. 

Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. 

Degree Requirements 

The appropriate master's degree will be conferred upon candidates who have 

(1) completed an approved program of study; 

(2) obtained a 3.0 cumulative GPA; and 

(3) passed a comprehensive examination. 



Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirements specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin for continuous enrollment. 

Attendance/Closed Class Policy 

The Department of Technology Education makes every attempt possible to provide students with 
access to classes offered through the department. For this reason, the following policy has been 
adopted for classes offered through the department. 

Students must attend the first class meeting. If a student does not attend the first class meeting of 
the semester, if the class is "closed", and if another student(s) is requesting enrollment in that section 
of the class, then the student not attending the first class meeting will forfeit his. her seat in the 
class, and the seat will be given to the student(s) requesting enrollment. The student(s) requesting 
enrollment must be present at the beginning of the first class meeting. 



College of Education and Psychology | 149 



The student who forfeited his/her seat will be responsible for completing the official procedures to 
"drop" the class. The Department will not automatically "drop" the student from the class. If the 
student fails to drop the class, and his.her name is on the grade roster, the student will receive an F 
for die course. 

The student awarded the seat in the class will be responsible for completing the official procedures 
to "add" the class. The Department will not automatically "add" the student to the class. 

Priority for requesting enrollment in the class will be given to graduating seniors, then to other 
students on a "first-come-first serve" basis. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester in which they are enrolled as a regular admit student. The Plan 
of Study Forms are available at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and 
then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Master of Science Degree in Technology Education 
with an Emphasis in Business Technology Education 

All students pursuing an emphasis in business technology education must complete the following 
requirements: 

Hours 

BTE 651, 652, 653, 608, 692 15 

REF601,607 6 

Electives — Nine (9) semester hours. Subject to the approval of the student's adviser 

or department chair; elective hours may be selected to structure a graduate minor or to 

cluster courses in support of specific certification requirements or other professional goals 9 

IK) 
Master of Science Degree in Technology Education 
with an Emphasis in Technical and Occupational Education 

All students pursuing an emphasis in technical and occupational education must complete the "\, 
following requirements: 



TOE605, 607, 611,692 12 L 

' - 



Hours E 

12 

REF60L607 6 












Electives — Twelve (12) semester hours. Subject to the approval of the student's adviser 

or department chair, elective hours are to be taken as follows: PI!P^.» 

1 . Three (3) elective hours must be taken in Technical and Occupational Education or I3|s!;: 
Instructional Technology %$tp; 

2. The remaining nine (9) semester hours may be selected to structure a graduate minor, or to 

cluster courses in support of specific certification requirements or other professional goals 12 

1*0 
Curriculum for Coordinators of Cooperative Vocational Education 
(Includes D.O. Co-Op) 

Prerequisite: Standard license in trade and technical education, business technology education, 
vocational home economics or vocational agriculture. 

Add-On Licensure Requirement 

Six (6) semester hours as follows: 

Hours 

BTE or TOE 552 History and Philosophy of Vocational Education 3 

BTE or TOE 553 Techniques/Problems of Coordination 3 

OR 

A Master of Science degree in Technology Education with an emphasis in Technical and 
Occupational Education or Business Technology Education which includes the above six (6) hours 
in lieu of "electives." 



150 | College of Education and Psychology 




Master of Science Degree in Instructional Technology 

All students pursuing the Master of Science degree in Instructional Technology must complete the 
requirements for one of the following options: 

Capstone/Thesis Option: 

Hours 

IT 636, 644, 645, 648, 698 or 699, 709, and 755 21 

REF601 and IT 601 6 

Electives — Six (6) semester hours. Subject to the approval of the student's adviser 

or department chair __6 

33 

Comprehensive Examination Option- 
Hours 

IT 636, 644, 645, 648, 709, and 755 18 

REF601 and IT 601 6 

Electives — Nine (9) semester hours. Subject to the approval of the student's adviser 

or department chair _9 

33 

Graduate Minors in Instructional Technology 

Master's/Specialist's Level Minor Requirements 

Six (6) semester hours of computer application coursework (minimum 2.50 GPA) at the 
undergraduate level or significant practical experience in computer applications. 

Three of the following IT core courses: IT 601, 636, 644, 645, 648, 709, 755 (9 hours) 

One of the following IT elective courses: IT 567, 569, 610, 625, 640, 650, 658, 662, 742, 780 (3 hours) 

Doctoral Level Minor Requirements 

Six (6) semester hours of computer application coursework (minimum 2.50 GPA) at the 
undergraduate level or significant practical experience in computer applications. 

Three of the following IT core courses: IT 601, 636, 644, 645, 648, 709, 755 (9 hours) 

Two of the following IT elective courses: IT 567, 610, 625, 640, 650, 658, 662, 742, 780 (6 hours) 



College of Health I 151 



College of Health 

Graduate Degrees 
2007-2008 



Department/School 



Major 



Degree 



Master's Level 

Community Health 



Human Performance 
and Recreation 



Public Health Master of Publ ic Health 

Epidemiology and Biostatistics Emphasis 
Health Education Emphasis 
Health Policy and Administration 

Emphasis 
Health Services Administration Emphasis 

(executive format) 
Occupational Health and Safety Emphasis 
Public Health Nutrition Emphasis 
MPH/MBA Dual Degree 





Human Performance 


Master of Science 






Exercise Science Emphasis 








Physical Education Emphasis 








Interscholastic Athletic 








Administration 


Master of Science 






Recreation and Leisure 








Administration 


Master of Science 






Sport Coaching Education 


Master of Science 






Sports and High Performance 








Materials 


Master of Science 






Sport Management 


Master of Science 






Dual Degrees 


Master of Science 






Sport Management/Business 








Administration (MBA) 






Medical Technology 


Medical Technology 


Master of Science 


ppp 


Nursing 


Nursing 


Master of Science in 


w&mb 



Nursing 
Adult Health Nursing Emphasis 
Community Health Nursing Emphasis 
Family Nurse Practitioner Emphasis 
Nurse Executive Emphasis 
Psychiatric Nursing Emphasis 
Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Emphasis 



Nutrition and Food Systems 
Social Work 



Nutrition and Food Systems 



Social Work 



Master of Science 



Master of Social Work 




152 || College of Health 



Department/School 



Major 



Degree 



Speech and Hearing Sciences 



Speech and Hearing Sciences 
Speech-Language Pathology 
Emphasis 
Education of the Deaf Emphasis 



Master of Arts 
Master of Science 



Doctoral Level 

Human Performance 
and Recreation 



Human Performance 
Administration and 
Teaching Emphasis 
Exercise Physiology Emphasis 
Sports and High Performance 
Materials 



Doctor of Education 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 



Nursing 

Nutrition and Food Systems 
Speech and Hearing Sciences 



Nursing 

Ethics Emphasis 
Leadership Emphasis 
Policy Analysis Emphasis 

Nutrition and Food Systems 
Audiology 



interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology 

**Graduate Certificate in Gerontology 

*** Graduate Certificate in Management of Child Nutrition Programs 

* Minor offered through all units. 

^Certificate in Gerontology offered through all units. 



Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Audiology 



College of Health I 153 



College of Health 

Peter J. Fos, D.D.S., Ph.D., Dean 
Vafa Kamali, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
Katherine Nugent, Ph.D., Associate Dean 
118 College Drive #10075 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5253 
www.usm.edu/colleges/coh 

Mission 

The mission of the College of Health is to create, apply, and transmit expert knowledge, within and 
across the domains of its constituent disciplines, for the well-being and betterment of individuals, 
community, state, nation, and world. 



Vision 

The vision of the College of Health is advancing health and well-being through excellence and 
innovation in teaching, research and service. 

Requirements for Admission 

Admission to the College of Health requires applicants to meet minimum grade point average 
(GPA) requirements as specified by the Graduate Studies Office for master's or doctoral study and 
submit acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). A minimum TOEFL score of 550 is 
required of all non-English speaking applicants. Applicants must also have at least three (3) letters 
of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study sent 
to the department or school. 

Applicants must also meet all additional requirements for admission to a particular program of 
study See the program description for additional admission criteria. The College of Health adheres 
to the university policies with regard to admission of graduate students on a conditional basis. The 
university regulations concerning conditional admissions for full or part-time students are stated 
in this Bulletin under Admission Requirements and Procedures. Members of all underrepresented 
groups are encouraged to apply. 

Requirements for Graduation 

In the College of Health, the minimum requirements for the master's and doctoral degrees are 
determined by the individual graduate programs within the seven units. Most programs offer both 
the thesis and nonthesis option, with the doctoral programs mandating a dissertation. All general 
requirements outlined earlier in this Bulletin must be satisfied for students to progress successfully 
toward degrees. While it is the student's responsibility to know what the degree requirements 
are, the major professor may assist the student with requirements of the Graduate Studies Office, 
department, or school. Comprehensive exams are required for graduate degrees. The specific degree 
program will determine whether the exam will be written or oral or both. Consult the specific degree 
programs for their requirements. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Residency is required for 
doctoral students. 

Certain programs require clinical experiences. Clinical experiences generally require a criminal 
background check. A felony conviction may disqualify a student from the clinical experience 
thereby making the student unable to complete the degree. For additional information, contact the 
academic unit that houses the program. 



i 

;■' 

'■ ■ 



Interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology 

The college offers an interdisciplinary minor in gerontology through each unit within the college. 
More detailed information on specific program requirements and assistance with program planning 
is available from the designated faculty adviser in each of the college units. A student who has been 
admitted for graduate study may earn an interdisciplinary minor in gerontology by completing a 
minimum of twelve (12) semester hours of graduate-level courses selected from the course list 
below. 



154 [ College of Health 



Graduate Certificate in Gerontology 

The college offers a graduate certificate in gerontology for those who need additional or specialized 
training, but do not wish to pursue a master's degree, or for current Southern Miss graduate students who 
wish to receive more than a minor degree. A graduate certificate in gerontology will provide students and 
professionals an opportunity to broaden their theoretical knowledge of aging, the aged, and the policy- 
making process; keep abreast of changes in the field, meet new educational requirements for their jobs; 
or prepare for a new position. More detailed information is available in the dean's office. 

Admission Requirements for the Certificate Program 

All applications for the graduate certificate program must be submitted to the Graduate Studies 
Office. In addition, all nondegree seeking students must submit the "Approval for Non-Degree 
Enrollment in a Graduate Course" form to the gerontology program coordinator. 

The gerontology program coordinator and the Gerontology Faculty Advisory Committee make 
admission recommendations to the College of Health dean and Southern Miss Graduate School 
based on evidence of holding, at a minimum, a baccalaureate degree from an institution approved by 
a recognized accrediting agency, and being in good standing at the last institution attended. 

Admission Deadline: Admission shall be on an ongoing basis. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudics - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Program Requirements 

• The student shall complete at least 18 semester hours with B or better in each course from the approved 
course list (see below). 

• The student may repeat a class only one time if he/she received less than a B. 

• Curriculum requirements consist of one core three-hour course (Seminar in Critical Issues of the Aged) 
and three hours of a gerontology practicum or supervised research in an approved field of study (to be 
determined with the gerontology program coordinator), with the remaining 1 2 hours selected from the 
course list below. 

• The student admitted within the College of Health or School of Nursing shall work with a designated 
gerontology adviser from the department of their discipline. If the student is from another college, the 
gerontology program coordinator will serve as the adviser for the certificate program. 

• The student shall complete requirements within four years. 

• The student may transfer as many as six (6) credit hours of graduate credit in gerontology from other 
accredited institutions with the approval of the gerontology program coordinator and the graduate 
dean, provided that the coursework falls within the four-year period allowed for the program. 

• No more than nine credits from the certificate program may be used towards a subsequent master's 
degree. 



wmmm mm 


Course List 




K!?-**s;t 


ADE 


580 




ADE 


750 




CHS 


611 


^§t 


CHS 


620 




CHS 


660 


m&iK 


CHS 


792 


tifrsife 


FAM 


553 


. . ' . :/, 


FAM 


598 


r**C??$? A 


FAM 


653 


,39 


FAM 


654 




FAM 


690 




FAM 


691 




FAM 


692 




HPR 


552 




HPR 


691 




HPR 


696 




NFS 


720 




NSG 


536 




NSG 


550 




NSG 


593 



Applied Educational Gerontology 

Education and the Older Adult 

Internship in Community Health* 

Chronic Disease Epidemiology 

Long Term Care Policy and Administration 

Special Problems in Health** 

The Family in Later Life 

British Studies Program: Aging and the Family 

Aging and the Family 

Special Topics in Gerontology 

Practicum in Family and Consumer Studies* 

Research in Family and Consumer Studies*** 

Special Problems in Family Relations** 

Gerontology and Therapeutic Recreation 

Research** 

Practicum* 

Nutrition and Aging 

Hospice: Concepts and Application 

Health Care of the Aged 

Health Care of the Elderly 



College of Health I 155 



British Studies: Hospice 

Death and Bereavement 

Special Problems in Gerontology 

Psychology of Aging and Death 

Communication Problems of the Aged 

Sociology of Aging 

Social Work Field Education Practicum* 

Social Work Practice with Persons in Middle and Late Life 

Special Problems** 

* Only practica placements in the field of gerontology can be used to satisfy requirements of this minor 
or the certificate. 



NSG 


599 


NSG 


606 


NSG 


692 


PSY 


556 


SHS 


642 


SOC 


524 


SWK 


673 


SWK 


675 


SWK 


692 



**Research or special problems must be related to gerontology. 

Department of Community Health Sciences 

James G. McGuire, Ph.D., Chair 
118 College Drive #5122 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5437 
www.usm.edu/chs 

Ahua, Anderson-Lewis, Carver, Exline, Fos, Hall, Hinton, Kamali, McGuire, Mcllwain, Mitra, Wliyte 

Unit Description 

The Department of Community Health Sciences was created as an organizational focus for expanded 
activities in community health. The department offers a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree 
and a MPH/MBA dual degree in conjunction with the College of Business. Emphasis areas include 
epidemiology and biostatistics, health education, health policy and administration, health services 
administration (executive format only). Faculty and staff are involved in interdisciplinary research 
and demonstration activities in areas such as health care access, health promotion, community 
health workers, impact studies, health care provider utilization, rural health, cancer control, and 
occupational health and safety. The Master of Public Health program seeks to prepare students for 
leadership responsibilities in public and private health settings that focus on improving quality of 
life through instruction, research, and community service. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. The 
MPH program is accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health. 

Interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology: The department participates in the interdisciplinary minor 
in gerontology and the graduate certificate in gerontology. Specific requirements and courses available 
for the minor and certificate can be found under the Interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology and 
Graduate Certificate in Gerontology headings in the College of Health section of this Bulletin. 



Offerings for Non-Majors 

A number of courses offered within the Department of Community Health Sciences do not have 
prerequisites and are excellent choices for electives: 

CHS 622 Epidemiology 

CHS 623 Biostatistics 

CHS 625 Health Administration 

CHS 655 Environmental Health 

CHS 656 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health 

CHS 685 Contemporary Issues in Health 

Degree Descriptions/Career Opportunities 

Epidemiology and Biostatistics: This emphasis area provides knowledge about the distribution and 
determinants of disease and other health-related conditions in human populations and develops 
methodological and analytical skills for study design and biostatistical analysis of data. Graduates 
are qualified for health service or research positions in local health departments, hospitals, nursing 
homes, academic institutions, industries, and government agencies such as the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 



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156 |j College of Health 






Health Education: Health education is concerned with the health-related behaviors of people. 
It focuses on the forces that affect those behaviors and the role they play in the maintenance, 
promotion, and improvement of health. Health education majors are eligible to take a certifying 
examination for entry-level health educators, qualifying them as Certified Health Education 
Specialists (CHES). 

Health Policy and Administration: Health administrators are charged with coordinating a wide 
variety of activities crucial to the effective and efficient delivery of health services and programs. 
The health administrator plans, organizes, coordinates, and supervises the delivery of services 
within health care organizations, including hospitals, mental health clinics, long-term care facilities, 
rehabilitation centers, insurance companies, and multidisciplinary physician groups. Students 
earning the MPH/MBA degree find positions in the above areas as well as with consulting firms. 

Occupational Health and Safety: Admissions in this emphasis area are suspended for this academic 
year. 

Public Health Nutrition: Admissions in this emphasis area are suspended for this academic year. 

Program Requirements 

1 . MPH students must complete the 45 hours of coursework, unless the 9 hours of internship is waived. 

2. MPH/MBA students must complete a minimum of 60 hours. 

3. Pass a comprehensive exam. 

4. Students must have a 3.0 GPA in all course work to graduate. 

Executive Master of Public Health in Health Services Administration: An MPH program designed 
for individuals who have completed an undergraduate degree and have at least three years of full- 
time work experience in a health care/service setting. The degree can be completed in 14 months 
using a rigorous, concentrated format that includes three classes each semester that meet on Friday 
and Saturday from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Five weekends are required each semester. For information on 
this degree program, contact Dr. Gordon Whyte in the Department of Community Health Sciences 
at 266-5435. 

The Health Services Administration emphasis (executive format) requires 42 hours of coursework, 3 
hours is a culminating experience practical application course. 

Internship 

Students must complete a nine-credit hour (400 clock hours) internship at an approved site. Those 
with at least three years of experience or a terminal degree in a relevant area may apply for a waiver 
of the internship requirement. 

Admission Requirements 

Application for admission to the MPH program is made through the Graduate Studies Office of the 
university and through the Department of Community Health Sciences. 

Applications are reviewed three times a year and are due July 15 for fall semester, October 15 for 
spring semester, and April 15 for summer term. 

A complete application consists of the Graduate Studies Office application, the Department of 
Community Health Sciences application and essay, GRE or GMAT scores, transcripts and three 
letters of reference from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study. 
International applicants also must submit TOEFL scores. 

Minimum GPA is 2.75 on the last 60 hours of coursework. 

Minimum TOEFL score is 550 for international applicants. 

Applications are evaluated by the department's Graduate Admissions Committee. Enrollment 
priority is given to Mississippi residents. Other factors in the decision for admission include the 
GPA, GRE or GMAT. scores, writing skills demonstrated in the essay, and the reference letters. 

Students applying to the MPH/MBA program must also apply to the MBA program and take the 
GMAT exam. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



College of Health I 157 

Masters in Public Health Core Requirements (18-24 hrs.) 

Hours 

CHS 622 Epidemiology .....3 

CHS 623 Biostatistics 3 

CHS 625 Health Administration 3 

CHS 655 Environmental Health 3 

CHS 656 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health 3 

CHS 611 Internship 3-9 

Requirements for Emphasis in Epidemiology and Biostatistics (21 hrs.) 

CHS 620 Chronic Disease Epidemiology 3 

CHS 680 Research Methods 3 

CHS 685 Contemporary Issues in Health or approved elective 3 

CHS 722 Infectious Disease Epidemiology 3 

CHS 723 Biostatistics II 3 

CHS 785 Data Management And Analysis in Public Health 3 

CHSElectives 3 

Requirements for Emphasis in Health Education (21 hrs.) 

CHS 508 Health Education Methods 3 

CHS 609 Community Health Education Planning 3 

CHS 512 Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education 3 

CHS 720 Community Organization for Health Education 3 

Approved Health Education Electives 9 

Requirements for Emphasis in Health Policy and Administration (21 hrs.) 

CHS 627 Health Policy 3 

CHS 657 Health Care Accounting for Managers 3 

CHS 670 Health Law and Justice 3 

CHS 710 Seminar 3 

CHS 757 Health Care Financial Management 3 

CHS 792 Special Problems in Health or CHS Electives 6 

The Occupational Health and Safety and the Public Health Nutrition 
emphasis areas are not currently accepting applicants. 

Masters in Public Health/Masters in Business Administration Dual Degree 
Foundation Courses (60 hrs. total) 

Students without undergraduate training in business may need to take the following foundation courses: 

MBA 500 Organizational Behavior 3 M 

MBA 511 Financial Accounting 3 I C 

MBA 520 Managerial Economics 3 Egf 

MBA 550 Marketing Foundations 

MBA 570 Managerial Finance 3 ; 









158 | College of Health 

Masters in Business Administration/Masters in Public Health Dual Degree 
Core Courses (60 hrs. total) 

MBA 600 Business and Society 3 

MBA 605 Marketing Management 3 

MBA 640 Problems in Corporate Finance 3 

MBA 645 Communication Skills for Managers 3 

MBA 650 Business Modeling 3 

MBA 660 Managerial Strategy and Planning 3 

CHS 601 Community Health Practice 3 

CHS 622 Epidemiology 3 

CHS 623 Biostatistics 3 

CHS 625 Health Administration 3 

CHS 655 Environmental Health 3 

CHS 656 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health 3 

CHS 627 Health Policy 3 

CHS 657 Financial Aspects of Health Care 1 3 

CHS 670 Health Law 3 

CHS 710 Seminar 3 

CHS 757 Financial Aspects of Health Care II 3 

CHS 792 Special Problems in Health 3 

Approved Elective 3 

CHS 61 1 Internship (unless waived) 3-9 

Executive Masters in Public Health in Health Services Administration 
(42 hrs) 

CHS 622 Epidemiology 3 

CHS 623 Biostatistics 3 

CHS 626 Introduction to Health Systems 3 

CHS 627 Health Policy 3 

CHS 655 Environmental Health 3 

CHS 656 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health 3 

CHS 657 Health Care Accounting for Managers 3 

CHS 670 Health Law and Justice 3 

CHS 716 Health Economics 3 

CHS 727 Health Care Strategic Planning 3 

CHS 737 Health Care Organizational Behavior/Human Resources 3 

CHS 747 Health Care Marketing 3 

CHS 757 Health Care Financial Management 3 

CHS 767 Case in Health Services Administration 3 

Requirements for Master's Minor in Public Health (18 hrs.) 

Approved electives 3 

CHS 622 Epidemiology 3 

CHS 623 Biostatistics 3 

CHS 625 Health Administration 3 

CHS 655 Environmental Health 3 

CHS 656 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health 3 



College of Health I 159 



School of Human Performance and Recreation 

Lou Marciani, Ed.D., Director 
118 College Drive #5142 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5386 
www.usm.edu.hpr 

Blom, Drane, Gould, Green, Hubble, Krebs, Maneval, Marciani, Phillips, Piland, Speed, Summar, Velasquez, 
Webster, Wolfe 

Unit Description 

The School of Human Performance and Recreation (HP&R) offers the Master of Science,the Doctor 
of Philosophy and the Doctor of Education degrees. Program development is oriented toward supply 
and demand in the professional job market and academic disciplinary definition. Flexibility of 
program requirements allows for academic fulfillment of individual career interests. 

Degree 

The following degree programs are offered within the School of HP&R: Master of Science degree 
in Human Performance, Master of Science in Recreation and Leisure Adminstration, Master of 
Science in Sport Management, Master of Science in Sport Coaching Education, Master of Science 
in Interscholastic Athletic Administration, Master of Science in Sports and High Performance 
Materials, dual degrees of Master of Science in Sport Management and Master of Science in Business 
Administration (MBA), Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Education in Human Performance, and 
Doctor of Philosophy in Sports and High Performance Materials. 

Emphases within the human performance master's degree program include: exercise science 
and physical education. The human perfonnance doctoral degree program includes two distinct 
emphases: administration and teaching, and exercise physiology. The administration and 
teaching emphasis (Ph.D. and Ed.D.) is accredited as an Advanced NCATE/NASPE educational/ 
administration studies program. The physical education emphasis (master's) program is approved 
by the National Association of Sport and Physical Education/National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education (NASPE/NCATE). 

Interdisciplinary Minor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology 

The school participates in the interdisciplinary minor in gerontology and the graduate certificate in 
gerontology. Specific requirements and courses available for the minor and the certificate can be 
found under the Interdisciplinary Minor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology headings in the 
College of Health and Human Sciences section of this Bulletin. 

Career Opportunities 

The doctoral degree program in human performance: administration and teaching emphasis is f 
designed for those who wish to pursue a further concentration in HP&R advanced teaching and 
research in administration or pedagogical areas. 

The doctoral degree program in human performance: exercise physiology is designed to prepare n\ 
students for advanced teaching and research careers in higher education and/or industry. " 

The doctoral degree program in sports and high performance materials is designed to create and p 
prepare multidisciplinary scientists who have specific advacned research skills in polymer science, |" 
exercise physiology and biomechanics and who are capable of developing new materials that I 
significantly improve athletic and human performance. 

si. 

Program Requirements 

The Master of Science degrees require a minimum of 36 semester hours beyond the bachelor's 
degree (with 18 hours of 600 level or higher). Some emphasis areas may require greater minimum 
hours beyond the bachelor's degree. The Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Education degrees 
require a minimum of seventy-two (72) semester hours beyond the master's degree, including the 
dissertation, research tools, and program course work. Comprehensive exams and a 3.0 GPA are 
required for graduation. 



160 | College of Health 



Admission Standards 

Admission to human performance and recreation degree programs is selective. Members of all 
underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. Regular admission is contingent on 
having graduated from a college or university with accreditation from appropriate, recognized 
national -level accrediting agencies. Admission to the program is contingent upon an applicant's 
academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and communication skills 
meeting the challenging demands of graduate programs in the fields of sport administration, 
human performance, or recreation. The School of Human Performance and Recreation adheres 
to university policies with regard to admission of graduate students on a conditional basis. In 
evaluating applications for program admission, the HP&R program admission committees utilize 
the following criteria: 

a. Academic record, a) a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.75 or higher based on 4.0 scale 
and calculated on the last 60 hours of the applicant's bachelor's degree program; b) bachelor's level 
major/minor in an appropriately related field of study or evidence of foundational and professional 
coursework in major which are deemed necessary or prerequisite for graduate-level course enrollment. 
Lack of evidence of work completed in foundational areas specific to particular program emphasis 
requirements will result in either a) prerequisite satisfaction prior to regular admission into specific 
programs or b) additional degree requirements identified as undergraduate deficiencies to be satisfied 
during the graduate degree program. Doctoral applicants must have achieved a GPA of 3.50 on all 
previous graduate work in order to be admitted under regular status. 

b. Graduate Record Examination. Applicants are required to submit the test results from the GRE as part 
of their application. The GMAT will also be acceptable for the Master of Science in Sport Management 
degree only . 

c. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applicants whose native language is not English 

must achieve a TOEFL score of 550 or more on the paper test or 250 or more on the computer test. 

d. Professional experience. While professional level work experience is not required for admission to the 
master's level program, two to three years of relevant work responsibilities strengthens support for an 
applicant's admission, particularly at the doctoral level. Doctoral applicants should submit a resume 
which indicates professional experiences and accomplishments as well as a one or two-page description 
of research interests and how this degree will support their career plans. Doctoral students should arrange 
for either an in-person or telephone interview with program faculty during the application process. 

e. Letters of recommendation. Each applicant should request a minimum of three letters of 
recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study, and 
these letters should be sent to the school. Two of the letters should address the applicant's academic 
preparation and capabilities. At the doctoral level, at least one letter should address professional 
competence. 

Academic Policies 

Prior to completion of the 12th semester hour in the HP&R graduate program (master's or doctoral), 
the student must request approval of an advisory committee through the director's office. Upon 
approval of committee membership by the graduate dean, the student must submit a proposed plan 
of study for advisory committee approval. This plan should include all degree requirements and 
specification of planned electives and options within the degree program. The approved plan should 
be forwarded to the director's office prior to the student's enrollment in his/her 13th graduate hour. 

Written and oral comprehensive examinations are required of all graduate students in the master's 
and doctoral programs. Requests to take these examinations must be made in the director's office. A 
3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

The student's graduate advisory committee shall be responsible for administration and evaluation of 
the student's comprehensive examination. The chair of the advisory committee shall be responsible 
for reporting the results of the examination to the director. At least three HP&R graduate faculty 
members within the degree emphasis area must comprise master's advisory committees. Doctoral 
advisory committees must include at least three eligible HP&R graduate faculty within the degree 
program area emphasized. 

Chairs of all advisory committees must be eligible HP&R graduate faculty. 



College of Health I 161 



A student's thesis or dissertation committee may be comprised of members of his/her advisory 
committee. It is expected that at least three (3) HP&R graduate faculty members from the advisory 
committee will be included on the student's thesis/dissertation committee. Additionally, an eligible 
HP&R graduate faculty member from the program emphasis area must serve as chair of the thesis/ 
dissertation committee. The student may request eligible members outside of the school to serve on 
the committee. All committee membership (advisory or thesis/dissertation) must be approved by 
the graduate dean. AH committee membership requests are submitted to the college dean upon the 
approval of the director of the school. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Master of Science Programs 
Human Performance 

Course requirements for the Master of Science degree in Human Performance include a minimum 
of thirty-six (36) semester hours of graduate work plus any undergraduate courses deemed necessary 
to correct deficiencies in the student's background. This degree program is designed to prepare 
professionals for leadership roles as physical educators or exercise specialists. This degree program 
prepares students for advanced graduate work or careers in the following emphasis areas: exercise 
science or physical education. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

These degree program emphases provide concentrations of graduate level courses which are 
designed to facilitate preparation for attainment of professional certifications in human performance 
fields. These include: American College of Sports Medicine certifications (exercise specialist and 
health fitness instructor); National Strength and Conditioning Association certifications (strength 
and conditioning specialists), and state of Mississippi AA teachers licensure for physical education. 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Exercise Science 

Career Opportunities 

This emphasis is specifically designed to prepare students as exercise physiologists or clinical 
exercise specialists. Career opportunities for the student choosing the exercise science emphasis 
exist in hospital, corporate, university, and wellness facilities. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

The exercise science emphasis offers several laboratory experiences designed to enhance the 
student's knowledge of metabolic testing, electrocardiography, graded exercise testing, exercise 
prescription, and blood collection/analysis. Courses with laboratory content include HPR 601, 602, 
701/701L, and 735. Each student may also enroll in six (6) hours of HPR 696 (Practicum). HPR 696 
provides the master's level student with opportunities for practical application of relevant theories in 
professional field setting. 

Special Program Requirements 

Students wishing to select the exercise science emphasis must have completed a baccalaureate 
degree in exercise science (or a related field), one course from either chemistry or biology, and 
additional undergraduate work in physiology and nutrition. 



Course Requirements (36-42-Hour minimum) „ 

BSC 551 Mammalian Physiology 3 

HPR 601 Exercise Physiology-... ; '.. 3 

HPR 602 Graded Exercise Testing 3 

HPR 680 Research Techniques 3 

HPR 701 Advanced Exercise Physiology 1 3 

HPR 701L Advanced Exercise Physiology I Laboratory 2 

HPR 706 Cardiovascular Physiology 3 

HPR 733 Nutrition in Human Performance 3 

HPR 735 Electrocardiography 3 

HPR 780 Graduate Seminar . 1 



162 I College of Health 

HPR 792 Speical Problems .3 

Select one course from REF 602, CHS 540, CSS 515, or PSY 660 3 

Students must select either thesis or nonthesis option. 

Thesis Option 

HPR 698: Thesis 6 

OR 

Nonthesis Option 

HPR 696: Practicum 6 

Elective 6 

Requirements for an Emphasis in Physical Education 

Career Opportunities 

Students wishing to pursue careers in the instruction of movement and fitness activities in school 
and nonschool settings should pursue this emphasis within the degree program. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

HPR 696 is designed to provide students with opportunities for practical applications of relevant 
theories in professional field settings. In this multihour course, each semester hour of credit requires 
40 clock hours of practicum. The student plans the practicum project and the instructor of record 
works with the student to develop a contract. The contract, mutually agreed upon by the student, 
the cooperating teacher or administrator, and the instructor of record, specifies the methods of 
accountability. 

Special Program Requirements 

Students seeking Mississippi AA teacher licensure must presently have an A Mississippi standard 
teacher licensure and must select this emphasis within the human performance degree. An 
undergraduate degree in physical education or a recognized teaching field from an NCATE 
accredited institution is required in the AA licensure program. 

Hours 

Course Requirements (36-hour minimum) 

REF 602: Introduction to Educational Statistics 3 

HPR 604: Advanced Motor Development 3 

HPR 677: Legal Aspects of Sport or EDA 710: School Law 3 

HPR 680: Research Techniques 3 

HPR 684: Sport Skill Analysis 3 

HPR 704: Tests and Measurement in Physical Education 3 

HPR 723: Adv. Methods of Teaching Physical Education 3 

HPR 742: Program Design in Human Performance 3 

HPR 744: Foundations & Trends in HP&R 3 

HPR 745: Analysis of Teaching & Supervision in Physical Education 3 

Core Requirements Total 30 

The student must choose from either the thesis or practicum/elective option listed below: 

Thesis Option 

HPR 698: Thesis 6 

Practicum/Elective Option 

HPR 696: Practicum (3-6 hrs.) or adviser-approved electives (3-6 hrs.) 6 



m 



Master of Science 
Sport Management 

The Master of Science in Sport Management degree program is to prepare professionals for 
advacned careers in the expanding sport industry by enhancing their critical thinking skills and 
exposing them to expert knowledge and research in the field of sport. The curriculum has been 
designed and developed to enable studenrs to aquire and demonstrate a set of management skills and 
an understanding of the sport industry through a combination of required core courses, electives, 
research and experiential components. 

This master's degree program is available fully online via Internet, in the classroom or a combination 
of online and traditional courses. 



College of Health I 163 



Career Opportunities 

The degree program is designed to prepare students for a career in interscholastic or intercollegiate 
athletic administration and coaching. The academic curriculum also serves students interested in 
pursuing job opportunities within the sport business industry, including facility/arena management 
club management, corporate sport operations, professional team management, and state and national 
governing agency administration. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

HPR 691 (Research) and HPR 694 (Field Problems) provide the student with an opportunity to 
perform applied research and problem solving under academic supervision in an area of career 
interest within the sport industry. 

HPR 696 (Practicum) offers the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in the actual 
work environment under the tutelage of an athletic administrator or sport industry professional. 
Each semester hour of academic credit requires a minimum of 50 clock hours of on-the-job training 
and is performed under the framework of a contract mutually agreed upon by the student, faculty 
supervisor, and agency personnel. 

Special Program Requirements 

A previous record of academic study in one of the areas of business administration is valuable and 
highly recommended in sport management. 

Core requirements (36 hrs. minimum) 

Hours 

HPR 612: Financial Management in Sport 3 

HPR 630: Socio-Ethical Issues in Sport 3 

HPR 642: Sport Venue and Event Management 3 

HPR 670: Organizational Leadership & Management in Sport 3 

HPR 677: Legal Aspects of Sport 3 

HPR 682: Applied Research Methods and Statistics in Sport 3 

HPR 696: Practicum 6 

HPR 715: Sport Marketing and Public Relations 3 

Electives: 

Nine (9) hours of electives to be approved by the student's advisor. 



Master of Science 

Sport Coaching Education 

The Master of Science in Sport Coaching Education is designed to train professionals in the 
most current and up-to-date coaching and technological skills. Training in methods for assessing, 
evaluating, coaching, and training a diverse range of athletes will prepare them for an advanced 
career opportunities in coaching fields within the intercollegiate, interscholastic, and youth 
sport areas. The curriculum has been designed and developed to enable students to aquire and 
demonstrate a set of coaching skills through a combination of required courses, electives, research, 
and experiential components. 

This master's degree program is available fully online via Internet, in the classroom or a combination 
of online and traditional courses. 



Career Opportunities 

The degree program is designed to prepare students for a career in interscholastic or intercollegiate 
coaching. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

HPR 691 (Research) and HPR 694 (Field Problems) provide the student with an opportunity to 
perform applied research and problem solving under academic supervision in an area of career 
interest within the sport industry. 

HPR 696 (Practicum) offers the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in the actual 
work environment under the tutelage of an athletic administrator, coach or sport professional. Each 
semester hour of academic credit requires a minimum of 50 clock hours of on-the-job training 
and is performed under the framework of a contract mutually agreed upon by the student, faculty 
supervisor, and agency personnel. 



164 | College of Health 



Special Program Requirements 

A previous record of academic study or previous experience in coaching is highly recommended for 
those interested in master coaching preparation. 

Course requirements (36 hrs minimum) 

Hours 

HPR 604 Advanced Motor Development 3 

HPR 605: Policy and Governance in Sport 3 

HPR 609 Sport Psychology 3 

HPR 670: Organizational Leadership & Management in Sport 3 

HPR 672 Advanced Development of Strength & Conditioning Programs 3 

HPR 675 Sport Coaching Methodology & Technology 3 

HPR 677: Legal Aspects of Sport » 3 

HPR 679 Care and Treatment of Athletic Injuries 3 

HPR 682: Applied Research Methods and Statistics in Sport 3 

HPR 684 Sport Skills Analysis 3 

HPR 696: Practicum 6 

Students must select either thesis or nonthesis option. 

Thesis Option 

HPR 698: Thesis 6 

OR 

Nonthesis Option 

HPR 696: Practicum 6 

Master of Science 

Interscholastic Athletic Administration 

Career Opportunities 

This program is targeted to individuals pursuing the position of high school athletic director. 

After completing the Master of Science in Interscholastic Administration, the graduate will be 
eligible for: 

• AA Licensure in Mississippi 

• Sit for Registered Athletic Administration (RAA) Certification 

• Sit for the Certified Athletic Administrator (CAA) national exam 

HPR 696 (Practicum) offers the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in the actual 
work environment under the tutelage of an athletic administrator coach or sport professional. Each 
semester hour of academic credit requires a minimum of 50 clock hours of on-the-job training 
and is performed under the framework of a contract mutually agreed upon by the student, faculty 
supervisor, and agency personnel. 

Special Program Requirements 

• Bachelor or master's degree 

• Current teaching license 

• GPA of 2.75 or higher on last 60 hours 

• Acceptable GRE score 

• TOEFL minimum score of 550 (internationals) 

• Three letters of recommendation with two of them being from supervising school 
administrators and one of the candidate's choice 

• Official transcripts from all higher learning institutions attended 

• Cover letter/staement of intent 



College of Health I 165 



• Professional portfolio 

• Writing sample 

• Successful interview with graduate committee 

• Minimum two years of successful teaching/coaching experience 

Course Requirements (36 hour minimum) Hours 

EDA 600 Introduction to Educational Leadership 3 

EDA 700 Public School Finance 3 

EDA 708 Developing and Managing Human Resources 3 

EDA 710 School Law 3 

HPR 630 Socio-Ethical Issues in Sport 3 

HPR 670 Organizational Leadership in Sport Administration 3 

HPR 677 Legal Aspects of Sport 3 

HPR 682 Applied Research Methods and Statistics 3 

HPR 715 Advanced Sport Administration Processes 3 

HPR 731 Administration of Interscholastic Athletic Programs 3 

HPR 696 Practicum 6 

All the HPR courses can be taken fully online or in the classroom. EDA courses must be taken on 
campus in a classroom. 

Master of Science 

Recreation and Leisure Administration 

The Master of Science in Recreation and Leisure Administration prepares students for professional 
careers in one of two areas: campus/community recreation or therapeutic recreation. The program 
is designed to provide students with additional academic preparation for work in administration of 
municipal, therapeutic or commercial programs. 

Career Opportunities 

The campus/community recreation administration emphasis prepares students who wish to pursue 
careers related to commercial recreation, outdoor recreation, community recreation, campus 
recreation, faith-based recreation, and park management. 

The therapeutic recreation emphasis prepares students who wish to pursue careers realted to the TR 
process (assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation) and practice of TR in community, 
educational, residential, and hospital settings.. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

HPR 691 (Research) and HPR 694 (Field Problems) provide the student with an opportunity to 
perform applied research and problem solving under academic supervision in an area of career 
interest within the sport industry. 

HPR 696 (Practicum) offers the student the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in the actual 
work environment under the tutelage of an athletic administrator, coach or sport professional. Each 
semester hour of academic credit requires a minimum of 50 clock hours of on-the-job training 
and is performed under the framework of a contract mutually agreed upon by the student, faculty 
supervisor, and agency personnel. 

Special Program Requirements 

Depending on the applicant's undergraduate preparation, the student may be required to take 
prerequisite courses in addition to the requirements of the graduate degree program. These 
prerequisites must be completed within the first semester of enrollment. 



Hill 






fWJf 



166 | College of Health 



Campus/Community Course Requirements (37 hour minimum) 

Core courses (13 hours) 

REF 602: Introduction to Educational Statistics 

HPR 680: Research Techniques 

HPR 694: Field Problems 

HPR 710: Problems and Emerging Trends in Recreation 

HPR 712: Philosophical Foundations in Recreation 

Professional Development (6 to 12 hours) 

Students will select one (1) of the following three (3) options: 
Option A: Thesis 
HPR 698: Thesis 

Option B: Internship 
HPR 696: Practicum 
HPR 691: Research (professional paper) 

Option C: Course Work 

Directed Electives 

HPR 691 : Research (professional paper) 

Electives: Select 12 to 18 hours with advisor's approval 

Upon graduation, the student may be eligible to sit for the Certified Parks and Recreation 
Professional (CPRP) exam. 

Therapeutic Recreation Course Requirements (37 hour minimum) 

Core courses (13 hours) 

HPR 680: Research Techniques 

HPR 694: Field Problems 

HPR 710: Problems and Emerging Trends in Recreation 

HPR 712: Philosophical Foundations in Recreation 

REF 602: Introduction to Educational Statistics 

Professional Development (6 to 12 hours) 

Students will select one (1) of the following three (3) options: 

Option A: Thesis 
HPR 698: Thesis 

Option B: Internship 
HPR 696: Practicum 
HPR 691: Research (professional paper) 

Option C: Course Work 

Directed Electives 

HPR 691: Research (professional paper) 

Electives: Select 12 to 18 hours with advisor's approval. 

Upon graduation, the student may be eligible to sit for the Certified Therapeutic Recreation 
Specialist (CTRS) exam. 

llliiilli 

Master of Science 

Sports and High Performance Materials 

The Sports and High Performance Materials research degree is a collaboration between two 
of the university's premier research schools, the School of Polymers and the School of Human 
Performance and Recreation. Educational objectives of the program are to create professional 
research scientists who have the specific multidisciplinary advanced research skills to develop and 
test new materials that significally improve athletic and human performance. 



College of Health I 167 



Career Opportunities 

Students graduating from this program will be research professionals who are specifically trained to 
study, understand, and improve the relationship between materials, safety and human performance 
throughout the sporting goods industry. Some of the areas where students will find employment are 
sport product management, sport product design, research, sport product development, sales and 
marketing and manufacturing. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

HPR 691 (Research) provides the student with an opportunity to perform applied research and 
problem solving under academic supervision in an area of career interest within the sport industry. 

Special Program Requirements 

Specific details of admission and program requirements are outlined in a separate handbook 
provided by the Sports and High Performance Materials Program. 

Course requirements (36 hrs minimum) 

Hours 

PSC 510 Safety Principles and Procedures in Chemical Sciences 1 

PSC701 Organic Polymer Chemistry 1 3 

PSC 710 Polymer Physical chemistry I. Solution Properties 3 

PSC 702 Organic Polymer Chemistry II or 

PSC 712 Polymer Physical Chemistry III: Solid State 3 

PSC 789 Polymer Science Seminar 1 

PSC 820 Advanced Composite Materials 3 

PSC 820L Advanced Composite Materials Laboratory 2 

HPR 701 Advanced Exercise Physiology 1 3 

HPR 701LAdvanced Exercise Physiology I Lab 2 

HPR 704 Test & Measurement in Human Performance 3 

HPR 734 Advanced Biomechanics 3 

HPR 734L Advanced Biomechanics Lab 3 

HPR 691 Research 1 to 12 

PSC or HPR 698 Thesis 1 to 6 

Dual Degree 

Master of Science in Sport Management and Master of 

Business Administration 

The Dual Master of Business Administration (MBA) and Master of Science Sport Management dual 
degree program is a collaboration between the College of Business and the College of Health. The 
MBA/Sport Management curriculum will be taught between the School of Human Performance 
and Recreation and the College of Business. This dual degree will afford gifted students a unique 
combination of sport industry experience and business knowledge, skills, and abilities relative to 
assuming an executive sport business person. A culminating internship experience with executives 
in professional and amateur sport organizations will give the student on-the-job training, networking |l§j| 
opportunities and access to a career within the sport industry. 

111113 

Students must meet requirements and prerequisites in BOTH programs in order to qualify for 
admission into this dual 60-semester-hour program. Upon completion of the program, the student 
will receive two graduate degrees: MBA and M.S. Sport Management. 

Career Opportunities 

Employment for the dual Master in Sport Management and Master of Business Administration 
graduate will be found in areas such as intercollegiate sports, professional sports, amateur sports, 
Olympics, event management, facilities management, sport fund raising, sport marketing, sports 
public relations, and corporate sports. 



«f 



1 



168 1 College of Health 

Course requirements (60 hour minimum) 

Hours 

MBA 610 Analytical Decision Making 3 

MBA 640 Problems in Corporate Finance 3 

HPR 670 Organizational Leadership & Management in Sport 3 

HPR 677 Legal Issues in Sport 3 

MBA 605 Problems in Marketing Management 3 

MBA 645 Communication Skills for Managers 3 

HPR 630 Socio-Ethical Issues in Sport . 3 

HPR 715 Advanced Sport Administration Processes 3 

MBA 600 Business and Society 3 

HPR 612 Financial Management in Sport 3 

MBA 650 Technology in Modern Organization 3 

MBA 660 Global Business Strategy 3 

HPR 682 Research Methods in Sport and Human Performance 3 

HPR 642 Sport Venue and Event Management 3 

Advisor Approved Electives 9 

HPR 696 Internship '. 9 



Doctoral Program 
Human Performance 









Career Opportunities 

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) emphasis in administration and teaching is designed not only 
to provide strong didactic disciplinary based curriculum, but to also provide strong research 
experiences for future careers in academia. 

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) emphasis in exercise physiology is specifically designed to 
prepare students as exercise physiologists leading to career opportunities in teaching and research in 
higher education and/or industry. 

Laboratories, Field Experiences, Internships, Practica 

HPR 796 (Practicum) is designed to provide students with opportunities for practical applications of 
relevant theories in professional field settings. In this multihour course, each semester hour of credit 
requires 50 clock hours of practicum. 

The student plans the practicum project and the instructor of record works with the student to 
develop a contract. The contract, mutually agreed upon by the student, the cooperating teacher or 
administrative supervisor, and the instructor of record, specifies the methods of accountability. 

A strong laboratory research emphasis is additionally integrated into doctoral studies in exercise 
physiology. Several laboratory experiences are designed to enhance the student's knowledge of 
metabolic testing, electrocardiography, graded exercise testing, exercise prescription, and blood 
collection/analysis. HPR 701/701L and HPR 805/805L are examples of courses widi laboratory content. 

Special Program Requirements 

1 . The student must complete a qualifying examination conducted by the student's graduate advisory 
commiitee during the student's first semester. Students should consult their program emphasis 
coordinator for the required examination process. 

2. A graduate degree and appropriate bachelor's preparation in the physical education, sport 
management, athletic training, or an appropriately related field is required for consideration for 
admission in the administration and teaching phases and exercise physiology of the doctoral 
programs. 

3. Programs of study, including all course requirements, independent research or field-based projects, 
and additional requirements specified by the university for proficiency in statistics, computer 
science or foreign language must be approved by each student's advisory committee. The general 
focus of dissertation research will be initially approved by the student's advisory committee. The 
specific nature and foci of the research must be approved by the student's dissertation committee. 

Research Tool(s) 

4. A Research tool(s) component is required of all doctoral students, and may be fulfilled in a variety 
of ways dependent upon the background, needs, and experience of the student. 

The following guidelines apply: 



College of Health I 169 



The Doctor of Philosophy degree requires nine (9) hours of statistics and either 

1) six (6) hours of a foreign language or 

2) six (6) hours of research electives. 

See program for specific course requirements. 
5. Upon the acceptance of the dissertation by the candidate's dissertation committee and at least six 
weeks prior to graduation, a final oral examination in defense of the candidate's dissertation will be 
administered by the student's dissertation committee. 
Residency 
Students must meet the residence requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudics - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Human Performance - Administration and 

Teaching Emphasis 

Hours 
Statistics/Research Component: (See program for specific course requirements) 9 

Foreign Language/Advanced Research Component: 

Committee-approved advanced research electives 6 

-or- 
Approved foreign language courses or demonstrated competency 
(See university foreign language guidelines in this Bulletin) 6 

Dissertation 12 

Course Requirements: 

HPR 677 Legal Aspects of Sport, or EDA 710 School Law 3 

HPR 680 Research Techniques in Human Performance & Recreation 3 

HPR 720 Administration of Human Performance Programs 3 

HPR 725 Facilities Management in Human Performance & Recreation 3 

HPR 742 Program Design in Human Performance 3 

HPR 744 Foundations and Trends in Human Performance & Recreation 3 

HPR 745 Analysis of Teaching and Supervision in Physical Education 3 

HPR 796 Practicum 3 

HPR 821 Advanced Administration of Human Performance Programs 3 

HPR 840 Professional Preparation in Human Performance 3 

HPR 845 Research in Teaching Physical Education 3 

Advisory committee-approved electives 12 

Total:— 72 

Doctor of Philosophy in Human Performance - Exercise Physiology 

Emphasis 

Hours 
Statistics/Research Component: (See program for specific course requirements) 9 

Foreign Language/Advanced Research Component: 

Committee-approved advanced research electives 6 

-or- 
Approved foreign language courses or demonstrated competency 
(See university foreign language guidelines in this Bulletin) 6 

Dissertation 12 

Co u rse Req ui rements : 

CHE 521 Biochemistry I „ 3 

CHE 522 Biochemistry II 3 

BSC 551 Mammalian Physiology 3 

HPR 701 Advanced Exercise Physiology 1 3 

HPR 701L Advanced Exercise Physiology I Lab 2 

HPR 706 Cardiovascular Physiology 3 

HPR 733 Nutrition and Human Performance 3 

HPR 780 Graduate Seminar 2 

HPR 791 Research 3 

HPR 792 Special Problems 6 

HPR 805 Advanced Exercise Physiology II 3 

HPR 805L Advanced Exercise Physiology II Laboratory 2 

Advisory committee-approved electives 9 

Total:— 72 



170 J College of Health 



Doctor of Philosophy 

Sports and High Performance Materials 

The Sports and High Performance Materials research degree is a collaboration between two of the 
university's premier research schools, the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials and 
the School of Human Performance and Recreation. Educational objectives of the program are to 
create professional research scientists who have the specific multidisciplinary advanced research 
skills to develop and test new materials that significally improve athletic and human performance. 

Admission Requirements 

Demonstrated excellence in course work, passing the cumulative examinations and passing of an 
oral examination that follows a written independent research proposal is necessary for a student to 
formally enter the doctoral program. Admission of students with previous graduate course work or 
master's degrees from other institutions will be considered on an individual basis. 

• The applicant must hold a master's degree from an institution approved by a recognized 
accrediting agency. 

• The applicant must be eligible to re-enter in good standing the last college or university 
attended. 

• The applicant must present evidence, by official transcipt, of a grade point average 
of no lower than 3.5 (calculated on a 4.0 scale) on previous graduate course work. 
Applicants must also submit official transcripts from all other institutions attended. 

• The applicant must have at least three letters of recommendation from persons qualified 
to assess the applicant's readiness for doctoral work. 

• Applicant's must have results from the general test of the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE) sent to Graduate Admissions. 

• International students should submit TOEFL scores. 
Admission to candidacy requires: 

• No more than 2 grades lower than a B in the first 27 hours of core courses; 

• A minimum GPA of 3.5 in at least 30 hours of graduate courses taken at USM, 
including the core courses and research; 

• Passing nine (9) of eighteen (18) cumulative examinations (comprehensive exam); 

• Passing an oral examination that follows the completion of a written independent 

research proposal; 

• Arrange for graduate advisor by the end of the first semester. 

Additional requirements for the Ph.D. degree dealing with residency, the research tools, the 
committee, the dissertation, the dissertation defense, application for candidacy and graduation are 
described elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Specific details of the admission and program requirements are outlined ina separate handbook 
provided by the Sports and High Performance Materials program. 

Career Opportunities 

Students graduating from this program will be research professionals who are specifically trained to 
study, understand, and improve the relationship between materials, safety and human performance 
throughout the sporting goods industry. Some of the areas where students will find employment are 
sport product management, sport product design, research, sport product development, sales and 
marketing and manufacturing. 

Doctoral students must take all core courses. 



College of Health j 171 



Course requirements (36 hrs minimum) 

Hours 

PSC 510 Safety Principles and Procedures in Chemical Sciences 1 

PSC 701 Organic Polymer Chemistry 1 3 

PSC 710 Polymer Physical chemistry I: Solution Properties 3 

PSC 702 Organic Polymer Chemistry II or 

PSC 712 Polymer Physical Chemistry III: Solid State 3 

PSC 789 Polymer Science Seminar 1 

PSC 820 Advanced Composite Materials 3 

PSC 820L Advanced Composite Materials Laboratory 2 

HPR 701 Advanced Exercise Physiology 1 3 

HPR 701LAdvanced Exercise Physiology I Lab 2 

HPR 704 Test & Measurement in Human Performance 3 

HPR 734 Advanced Biomechanics 3 

HPR 734L Advanced Biomechanics Lab 3 

HPR 691 Research 1 to 12 

PSC or HPR 698 Thesis 1 to 6 

In addition, the student is required to complete nine (9) hours of 800-level electives and twelve (12) 
hours of dissertation. 

Department of Medical Technology 

M. Jane Hudson, Ph.D., Chair 
118 College Drive #5134 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4908 
www.usm.edu/medtech 
Beck, Hall, Hudson, Lux 



Master of Science Program 



The Master of Science in Medical Technology degree programs seek to provide the student with 
skills and knowledge for professional enhancement. Graduates of the programs may be candidates 
for positions as laboratory managers, education coordinators, hospital or college/university medical 
technology faculty members, researchers, departmental supervisors, etc. The program is structured 
to provide the student with an area of emphasis. 

The Department of Medical Technology offers two programs leading to the master's degree in medical 
technology. One program is for the individual who possesses certification as a medical technologist 
from a recognized national certifying agency. This certification is an entrance requirement. 

The second program is for the individual who does not hold certification as a medical technologist 
from a recognized national certifying agency. This program includes a medical technology practicum 
that allows the individual to become eligible to take a national certification examination. To exit this 

program, the student must make a score on a nationally recognized certification examination that is | 
deemed satisfactory by the graduate medical technology faculty. 

I- ' - 
Admission Requirements '\ : 

SKtp 

For both programs, in addition to meeting the general requirements of the Graduate School and 
university as stated in this Bulletin,, the applicant must submit scores from the GRE and three letters I ' 
of recommendation. Letters of recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department or school. Students 
admitted will receive either regular or conditional admission, as described earlier in this Bulletin. 
Students admitted on conditional basis must make a grade point average of at least 3.0 the first 
semester on specific courses designated by the department faculty (specifically on the first nine 
(9) hours of coursework numbered 500 or above or on all coursework taken while completing this 
nine (9)-hour requirement). Regardless of previous college experience, if English is not the native 
language of any student, evidence of English proficiency must be provided prior to admission into 
the graduate program. The MTELP (Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency) requirement is 
"Proficiency II" and is preferred by the department. Alternatively a TOEFL of 550 may be accepted. 
In addition, a score of 4 ("functional language skills") must be earned on a fluency test administered 
by the English Language Institute. This fluency test is specifically designed to determine listening 
and speaking skills with respect to situations and language expected during the practicum phase of 
the program. 



«#-», 



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172 || College of Health 



To receive maximum consideration, graduate applications for the fall semester should be received 
by the department by April 15, and applications for the spring semester should be received by 
November 1. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/gradnatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of thirty (30) semester hours of coursework, excluding hours awarded for thesis, 
is required for the thesis option. A minimum of thirty-six (36) semester hours of coursework is 
required for the nonthesis option. In addition, individuals who do not hold certification at admission 
must complete a practicum of forty-six (46) hours. If a student has a felony conviction, the student 
may not be able to complete this degree because the student may not be able to perform the clinical 
experience. A minimum of eighteen (18) semester hours must be in courses numbered 600 or above. 
The courses should interrelate and be directed toward an area of emphasis. An area of emphasis such 
as microbiology, chemistry, hematology, immunology, management, or education will be chosen by 
the student. All coursework will be designated and approved by the student's graduate committee 
during the first semester of the program. Students selecting the thesis option are required to write a 
thesis under the direction of a medical technology department faculty member on a subject approved 
by the student's graduate committee. The student's graduate committee is composed of a chair 
and two members recommended by the department chair and appointed by the Graduate Studies 
Office. Courses in which a student receives less than a C will not be counted toward the degree. 
A student may not have more than two practicum courses and two other courses with a grade of C 
or below. Upon completion of coursework, all students must pass oral and written comprehensive 
examinations. Additionally, a student selecting the thesis option must successfully present an oral 
defense of the master's thesis. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA to graduate. 

Nonmajor master's students must obtain permission from the instructor to register for MTC 502, 
502L, 504, 504L, 506, 506L, 515. Registration for practicum-level courses is limited as described in 
this Bulletin. 

The Center for Science and Mathematics Education offers a program leading to the Doctor of 
Philosophy or Doctor of Education degree in Science Education with an emphasis in medical 
technology. Graduates of this program may be candidates for faculty positions in a variety of 
educational settings. See entry for Science and Mathematics Education for further information. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



School of Nursing 



Katherine Nugent, Ph.D., Director 

Anna Brock, Associate Director for Graduate Programs 

118 College Drive #5095 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-5500 

www.usm.edu/nursing 

Anderson, Brock, Butts, Chatham, Coyne, Harbaugh, James, Lundy, Luther, Masters, Mitchell, Nugent, 
Reinert, Rich 

Unit Description 

The School of Nursing offers programs at three sites - Hattiesburg, the Gulf Coast, and Meridian. 
The director is responsible for the implementation of programs on all sites. There are campus 
coordinators at Meridian and the Gulf Coast who coordinate scheduling and student admission and 
advisement at these sites. The associate director of graduate programs is responsible for admission 
and advisement of graduate students on the Hattiesburg campus. 

Master of Science in Nursing Degree Program 

The School of Nursing offers the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree with specialization 
in adult health nursing, community health nursing, family nurse practitioner, nursing executive, 
psychiatric nursing, and psychiatric nurse practitioner. 



College of Health I 173 



The puiposes of the master's program in nursing are to provide study in advanced nursing practice 
and role development, and to provide a foundation for doctoral study. 

Admission Requirements 

The School of Nursing adheres to the university policies with regard to the admission of graduate 
students. In a limited number of cases, conditional admission may be granted to applicants who 
do not meet the minimum requirements. Members of all underrepresented groups are strongly 
encouraged to apply. In addition to meeting the university requirements for admission to graduate 
study, the master's program applicant must have: 

1 . graduated from a baccalaureate program accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting 
Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education; 

2. a 3.0 grade point average (GPA) in undergraduate nursing courses and a minimum 2.75 GPA on the 
last 60 hours; 

3. completed an introductory course in statistics; 

4. physical assessment skills, 

5. submitted scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); 

6. unencumbered registered nurse (RN) license; 

7 . proof of immunization against the Hepatitis B virus; 

8. current cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certificate; 

9. a yearly tuberculosis (TB) skin test; 

10. proof of a recent health examination; and 

1 1 . submission of three letters of reference from employers, supervisors, teachers, or others who are 
qualified to assess the student's academic ability and readiness for graduate study The letters should 
be sent to Graduate Programs in the School of Nursing. 

Exceptions to the above criteria must be approved by the coordinator for the Graduate Program, the 
director of the School of Nursing, and the Office of Graduate Studies. 



Academic Progression 

A student must maintain a 3.0 grade point average each semester and may not earn more than 6 
hours with a grade of C in the program of study. Failure to meet this requirement will result in 
denial of progression in the graduate nursing program. 

Additional Requirements 

Students enrolled in any laboratory course must adhere to agency guidelines and must maintain 
their nursing license to practice throughout the program of study. Students must purchase liability 
insurance through the university. The insurance fee will be charged for each semester the student 
is enrolled in a clinical course at the time of registration. NP students will be expected to purchase 
physical assessment equipment. 

Students must remain current in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA) 
training. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudics - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Program Requirements 

Forty-five (45) to fifty-four (54) credit hours are required to complete the program: 21 hours in the 
core and 24 to 33 hours in the area of emphasis, including clinical courses, guided electives, and 
support courses (18 hours at the 600 level). A comprehensive exam and a 3.0 GPA are required to 
graduate. 

Depending upon enrollment and resources, all nursing emphasis areas may not be available at 
the Hattiesburg, Gulf Park, and Meridian campuses. The master's programs on the Gulf Park and 
Meridian campuses are offered on alternate weekends. 

If a student has a felony conviction, the student may not be able to complete the degree because the 
student may not be able to perform the required clinical experience. 



I1MJ1 



lilt 

Sill 



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174 | College of Health 



Family nurse practitioner students must petition by October 1 to seek admission into the clinical 
course sequence that begins in the spring semester. Acceptance is contingent on students having 
completed prerequisite courses and facility and clinical availability. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Emphasis Areas 

Students may select from the following emphasis areas (required emphasis area courses are also 
listed): 

Adult Health Nursing** 

Required courses: NSG 646, 647, 648/648L, 640/640L, 641/641L, and electives 
Community Health Nursing** 

Required courses: NSG 621, 622/622L, 623/623L, and electives 
Family Nurse Practitioner* 

Required courses: NSG 646, 647, 648/648L, 661/661L, 662/662L, 663/663L, 664L, MTC 601 
Nursing Service Executive** 

Required courses: NSG 539, 612, 618/61 8L, 619, 679L, and electives 
Psychiatric Nursing** 

Required courses: NSG 630, 631/631L, 632/632L, 633/633L, and electives 
Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner* 

Required Courses: NSG 630, 631/631L, 632/632L, 633/633L, 634L, 646, 647, 648/648L 

*Upon graduation, students are eligible to sit for the national certification examinations. 

**Extra clinical experience may be built into these programs to meet eligibility requirements for 
national certification exams. 

Core Courses: Hours 

Graduate Level Statistics Course 3 

NSG 600 Policy, Organization and Financing of Health Care 3 

NSG 602 Ethics, Role, and Diversity in Advanced Nursing 3 

NSG 603 Nursing Research 1 3 

NSG 604 Nursing Research II 3 

NSG 698 Thesis or NSG 691 Project and Elective 6 

Master of Science in Nursing for 

Graduates of Diploma and Associate Degree Programs 

In keeping with its commitment to excellence and leadership in nursing, the School of Nursing 
offers a Master of Science in Nursing degree designed for nurses holding an Associate Degree 
(ADN) or a Diploma in Nursing. ADN or diploma nurses may complete the degree requirements in 
two to two-and one-half (2-2 1/2) years of fiill-time study. With this plan, students do not receive 
the baccalaureate degree, but after completing prerequisites they may proceed with the graduate- 
level courses. Students may elect to pursue the program of study on a part time basis. Students 
select an emphasis area on admission. 

Admission Requirements 

1 . an Associate Degree or Diploma in Nursing from a program accredited by the National League for 
Nursing Accreditation Commission 

2. evidence of an unencumbered registered nurse license 

3. an overall GPA of 2.75 

4. a minimum of a C grade in each course applicable to the nursing curriculum (only one natural science 
course may be repeated once) 

5. a GPA of 3.0 in every nursing course 

6. proof of immunization against the Hepatitis B virus 

7. proof of recent health examination 

8. tuberculosis skin test yearly 

9. current CPR certification 

1 0. submission of scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

1 1 . three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for 
graduate study sent to the School of Nursing 



College of Health I 175 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Program Requirements 

The generic Master of Science in Nursing degree requires a minimum of 94 undergraduate credit 
hours that include 30 hours of credit for lower-division nursing courses. The student must complete 
22 hours of upper division nursing courses with a GPA of 3.0 or better. Students declare their 
emphasis area at the time of admission to the program. All candidates for the degree must complete 
a minimum of 45 semester hours of coursework leading to the Master of Science in Nursing Degree. 
Students seeking admission to the Family Nurse Practitioner Program must meet the additional 
requirements for admission and complete a minimum of 52 semester hours of coursework. 
Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner students must complete a minimum of fifty-four (54) semester hours 
of coursework (18 hours at 600 level). Academic progression policies are the same for all master's 
degree students. A comprehensive exam is required. The students must complete the entire program 
of study and have a 3.0 GPA in order to receive a degree. 

If a student has a felony conviction, the student may not be able to complete the degree because the 
student may not be able to perform the clinical experience. 

Financial Assistance 

Traineeships/scholarships may be available from federal and state funding sources depending on 
the selected area of study and availability of funding in any given year. Financial assistance also is 
available from the Financial Aid Office of the university. Funding resources are subject to change, 
and payback clauses may be part of the funding agreement. 

Interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology 

The School of Nursing participates in the interdisciplinary gerontology minor offered with the 
College of Health. A designated faculty adviser in the school assists interested students in completing 
the requirements for that minor. Specific requirements and courses available for the minor can be 
found in the College of Health section of this Bulletin. 

Graduate Certificate in Gerontology 

The school collaborates with the College of Health offering a graduate certificate in gerontology for 
those who need additional or specialized training, but who do not wish to pursue a master's degree, 
or for current Southern Miss graduate students who wish to receive more than a minor degree. A 
graduate certificate in gerontology will provide students and professionals an opportunity to broaden 
their theoretical knowledge of aging, the aged, and the policy-making process, keep abreast of 
changes in the field, meet new educational requirements for their jobs, or prepare for a new position. 
Specific requirements and courses available for the certificate are in the College of Health section 
of this Bulletin. 



Graduate Certificate in Nursing 

The School of nursing offers graduate certificates in Nursing for MSN graduates who desire to 
obtain additional education in another clinical emphasis area (see emphasis areas listed on prior 
pages). These certificates will provide students and professionals an opportunity to gain expertise 
in another emphasis area to meet educational and role requirements for their present or future 
employment or to meet advanced clinical certification in specialty areas. 

Admission Requirements 

MSN degree from a program accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting 
Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (must submit official 
transcript) 

An unencumbered registered nurse (RN) license 

All other general requirements required by the Graduate Studies Office (see Bulletin) 



Pffe 



176 



College of Health 



Program Requirements 

a minimum of 1 8 credits hours is required 

Student will complete the required emphasis area core and clinical courses identified by 
the Associate Director of Nursing after reviewing the student's official MSN transcript. 

Student must earn a B or better in each course required for the certificate. 

Student may repeat one course only one time if he/she has received a grade of less 
than a B. 

Student shall complete the requirements for the Certificate within 4 years. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The purpose of the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Nursing is to prepare scholars with expertise 
in selected, substantive areas who will contribute to the science and practice of nursing through 
systematic inquiry and theory development. Graduates will be prepared to meet state, regional, and 
national needs for doctorally prepared faculty in schools of nursing and other leadership positions in 
health-related organizations. 

The school has a collaborative program with the University of Mississippi Medical Center School 
of Nursing. Each university grants its own degree, but there are common admission requirements 
and a common core of courses that may be taken on either campus. Each institution has different 
selected fields of study. 



Admission Criteria 

Application for admission to the program must be completed by March 1 of the year students seek 
fall admission. Admission to the doctoral program depends upon sufficient enrollment, university 
resources, and qualifications of applicants. A select number of students will be admitted to the 
program based on the following criteria: 

1 . graduation from a master's program in nursing with a practice focus accredited by the National 
League for Nursing Accreditation Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education 

2. evidence of current unencumbered licensure to practice professional nursing 

3. three letters of reference, including two from doctorally prepared nurses and one from a current or 
recent employer, that speak to the applicant's intellectual ability, academic potential, and professional 
achievement; the letters should be sent to the School of Nursing 

4. evidence of communication skills (portfolio of scholarly work) 

5. a 3.50 grade point average on all previous graduate work 

6. satisfactory scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) 

7. an interview (personal or telephone) with one or more faculty members 

8. congruency between student goals and interests and faculty/program emphasis areas 

Academic Progression 

A series of examinations and procedures mark the student's progression in the Ph.D. program. 

1 . selection of a Doctoral Program Committee and filing academic program of study 

2. a comprehensive examination administered after all major coursevvork has been completed 

3. selection of a dissertation committee which will oversee the student's work toward the degree 

4. a final oral examination (dissertation defense) which covers the dissertation research and related 
fields administered at the completion of the dissertation 

5. fulfillment of the residency requirement, which may be met by continuous enrollment of 
6 semester hours for each of 4 consecutive semesters 

9 semester hours for each of 3 consecutive semesters, or 
1 2 semester hours for each of 2 consecutive semesters 

6. fulfillment of Research Tool(s) requirements 

7. a 3.0 GPA is required for graduation 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



College of Health I 177 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



Curriculum-A total of 65-66 semester hours are required for graduation 
Common Core — 14-15 Semester hours 

Course Semester 

Hours 

NSG 701 -Philosophy of Science 3 

NSG 702-Theory Development 3 

NSG 7 1 0-Quantitative Research Designs 3 

NSG 71 1-Qualitative Research Designs 3 

Advanced Statistics 2-3 

Southern Miss College of Nursing Core 

(in addition to the common core) — 18 semester hours 

Course Semester 

Hours 

NSG 703-Theory Development II 3 

Advanced Statistics 3 

NSG 712-Instrument Development and Analysis 3 

NSG 720-Issues in Bioediics 3 

NSG 740-Issues in Leadership 3 

NSG 760-Introduction to Nursing and Health Policy 3 

Emphasis Areas and Support Courses — 21 semester hours 

Students may select one of the three major emphasis areas- ethics, leadership, or policy analysis- 
from which to complete 21 semester hours of study. Students will register for 9-12 semester hours 
in their fields of study, and 9-12 hours of courses that will support their emphasis areas from other 
schools and departments in the university (e.g. 12 hours of ethics and 9 hours of support courses to 
equal 21 semester hours). 

Emphasis Areas 

Students must take 9-12 semester hours in the selected emphasis area: 

Ethics 

NSG 721, 722, 723, 724 
Leadership 

NSG 741, 742, 743,744 
Policy Analysis 
NSG 761, 762, 763, 764 
Dissertation 

A total of 12 semester hours is allotted for the dissertation research. 

Research Tools Requirement 

The following courses meet the research tools requirements for the college: 

NSG710-3hrs. 
NSG 711 -3hrs. 
NSG712-3hrs. 
Advanced Statistics - 3 hrs. 



mm 



178 1 College of Health 



Department of Nutrition and Food Systems 

Kathy Yadrick, Ph.D., Chair 
118 College Drive #5172 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5377 
www.usm.edu/nfs 

Bounds, Brown, Connell, Molaison, Rushing, Yadrick, Zoellner 

Unit Description 

The Department of Nutrition and Food Systems offers the Master of Science degree and the Doctor 
of Philosophy degree in Nutrition and Food Systems, and a graduate certificate in Management of 
Child Nutrition Programs. 

Interdisciplinary Minor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology: The department participates in 
the interdisciplinary minor in gerontology and graduate certificate in gerontology. 

Specific requirements and courses available for the minor and the certificate can be found under the 
Interdisciplinary Minor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology headings in the College of Health 
section of this Bulletin. 

Graduate Certificate in Management of Child Nutrition 
Programs 

The Graduate Certificate in Management of Child Nutrition Programs is available for those who 
desire specialized training but do not wish to pursue a master's degree Courses are offered in an 
online format to meet professional requirements of individuals employed in or seeking employment 
in School Nutrition Programs. 

Master of Science in Nutrition and Food Systems 

Overview of Major 

The Master of Science degree in Nutrition and Food Systems offers graduates opportunities to 
pursue careers in dietetics, school food service and child nutrition program management, food and 
nutrition services management, and community nutrition. The curriculum is designed to provide 
students with an understanding of research design and advanced knowledge in applied nutrition, 
food systems management, or both. Students with appropriate prerequisites may also make 
application to complete requirements for credentialing as a registered dietitian through Southern 
Miss' Didactic Program in Dietetics and Dietetic Internship, both of which are accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association. 

Requirements for Admission 

Regular admission to the Department of Nutrition and Food Systems master of science degree 
program requires a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution, a grade point average (GPA) of 
at least 2.75 in the last 60 hours of coursework, a 3.0 GPA in major, submission of test scores from 
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and three letters of recommendation from professionals 
familiar with the applicant's work and qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study. 
The letters of recommendation should offer clear support for the applicant's ability and potential 
for success in the program and should be sent to the Department of Nutrition and Food Systems. 
Performance in specific courses related to the desired major will also be evaluated. Graduate work 
in the major and minor fields of specialization must be preceded by coursework sufficient to satisfy 
undergraduate requirements or enough related work to indicate the student's ability. to do graduate 
work in the major and minor fields. Students may correct academic deficiencies by taking or auditing 
recommended undergraduate courses. Members of all underrepresented groups are encouraged to 
apply. 

Requirements for Graduation 

In the Department of Nutrition and Food Systems, the minimum requirement for a master's degree 
is 36 semester hours (18 hours of 600 level or higher). The degree plan offers thesis and nonthesis 
options; the requirements for these options differ. All students will take comprehensive examinations 
as described in the departmental manual for graduate students. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 



College of Health I 179 



Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Requirements for the Master of Science in Nutrition and Food Systems 

Core Requirements (12-15 hours) Hours 

CHS 623 Introduction to Biostatistics 3 

NFS 703 Research Techniques for Nutrition and Food Systems 3 

NFS 715 Recent Developments in Applied Nutrition 3 

OR 

NFS 694 Current Topics in Food Systems Management 3 

NFS 698 Thesis (6 hours) 6 

OR 

NFS 692 Special Problems (professional project) 3 



For the remaining 21-24 hours, students can elect to pursue one of three tracks. Dietetics Practice, 
Food and Nutrition Programs Management, or Applied Nutrition. Students select coursework with 
guidance from their advisor, with a minimum of 15 hours from NFS courses. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must complete the Application for Admission for Graduate Studies, indicating Non- 
Degree under Academic Status, and submit the application to the Office of Graduate Studies, 118 
College Drive #10066, Hattiesburg, MS 39406. Applicants must submit a letter of application to 
the graduate coordinator, Department of Nutrition and Food Systems, 118 College Drive #5172, 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406. The letter should describe their professional goals and how this certificate 
program fits into those goals. The graduate program committee of the Department of Nutrition and 
Food Systems makes admission recommendations based on evidence of holding, at a minimum, a 
baccalaureate degree from an institution approved by a recognized accrediting agency, and being in 
good standing at the last institution attended. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Program Requirements 

1) The student must complete 18 semester hours of courses as specified below, with a grade of B or 

better in each course. 

2) The student may repeat a class only one time if he/she receives a grade less than a B. 

3) The student must complete requirements within four years. 

Courses 

NFS 545 Financial Management in Nutrition and Food Systems 

NFS 575 Food Production Management 

NFS 625 The Nutrition of Children 

NFS 673 Child Nutrition Program Management 

NFS 690 Current Topics in Child Nutrition Programs 

NFS 715 Recent Developments in Applied Nutrition 

Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition and Food Systems 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Nutrition and Food Systems will prepare students for leadership 
and research positions in nutrition or food systems. Career choices upon completion of the Doctor 
of Philosophy include teaching/research positions in institutions of higher learning, administrative 
positions in large food service programs including schools and medical and military facilities, 
and research positions in public and private sectors. Depending on selection of classes, students 
may emphasize applied nutrition, food systems management or both areas in their program. The 
curriculum requires 54 semester hours beyond the master's degree. Research tools proficiency, 
comprehensive exam, a dissertation, and a 3.0 GPA are also required for graduation. 



180 



J College of Health and Human Sciences 



Requirements for Admission 

In addition to meeting the university requirements for admission to the Graduate School, the 
doctoral program applicant must meet the following requirements for admission to the Nutrition and 
Food Systems program: 

1. Completion of a master's degree and prerequisite courses for the area of major emphasis is 
required. Food service management prerequisites include food service management, quantity 
foods, management, general/normal nutrition, life cycle nutrition, and univariate statistics. Applied 
nutrition prerequisites include general, organic, and biochemistry, advanced nutrition, anatomy and 
physiology, food service management, and univariate statistics. 

2. A minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale is required on previous graduate work. 

3. Submission of acceptable GRE scores is required. 

4. A minimum of two years of professional experience in nutrition, food service management, or a 
related area is recommended. 

5. A current vita and a letter of application should be submitted to the chair of the Department of 
Nutrition and Food Systems. The letter of application should include career goals and reasons for 
pursuing the Doctor of Philosophy, should state the intent to emphasize food service management, 
applied nutrition, or both, and should indicate how previous education and work experience have 
prepared the individual to pursue the Doctor of Philosophy. 

6. Three letters of recommendation addressing professional competence and readiness for doctoral 
work should be sent directly to the Department of Nutrition and Food Systems. 

7. An interview must be scheduled with the graduate faculty in Nutrition and Food Systems. 

8. Applicants whose native language is not English must present a minimum TOEFL score of 550. 

9. The application must be approved by the graduate faculty, the chair of the Department of Nutrition 
and Food Systems, and the dean of the College of Health. 

NOTE: Students not meeting the requirements for regular admission may be considered 
for conditional admission. 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



Requirements for a Doctor of Philosophy in Nutrition and Food Systems 
Research Tool(s). The student must demonstrate proficiency in statistical methods. 

Statistics Proficiency. The statistics requirement may be met by choosing three (3) of the following 

courses or by approval of the student's advisory committee. 

CHS 623: Biostatistics 

CHS 723: Biostatistics II 

PvEF 761 : Experimental Design 

REF 762: Advanced Regression Analysis 

REF 824: Advanced Experimental Design 

REF 830 Multivariate Analysis in Educational Research 

PSY764: Factor Analysis 

Core Requirements (15 hours) 

NFS 810 Food and Nutrition and Public Policy 

NFS 774 Management of Nutrition Services: A Behavioral Approach 

NFS 703 Research Techniques for Nutrition and Food Systems 

NFS 81 1 Doctoral Seminar (total of 3 credit hours) 

NFS 820 Theories in Nutrition and Food Systems Research 

Dissertation (12 hours) 

NFS 898 Dissertation 

Other Coursework (27 hours) 

Includes coursework from nutrition and food systems and other disciplines. Specific courses must 
be approved by the student's graduate committee. A minimum of six (6) hours must be taken from 
areas outside nutrition and food systems. A minimum of nine (9) hours must be taken from NFS 
courses. 



College of Health 181 



School of Social Work 

Michael D. Forster, Ph.D., Director 

Timothy Rehner, Ph.D., Assistant Director 

Joseph Bohanon, M.S.W., Coordinator of Field Instruction 

118 College Drive #5114 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4163 

www.usm.edu/socialwork 

Davis, Forster, Kolbo, Lee, Rehner, Scurfield 

Unit Description 

The primary purpose of the School of Social Work is to provide professional social work education 
to undergraduate and graduate students. The school offers the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) 
degree and the Master of Social Work (MSW) degree. 

The social work profession recognizes the BSW degree as preparing students for entry-level 
general ist social work practice in social service agency settings. The MSW degree prepares students 
for advanced practice in agency settings and in private practice. The school is accredited by the 
Council on Social Work Education. 

Interdisciplinary Minor in Gerontology 

The School of Social Work participates in the interdisciplinary minor in gerontology and the graduate 
certificate in gerontology. Specific requirements and courses available for the minor and the certificate 
can be found under the Interdisciplinary Minor and Graduate Certificate in Gerontology headings in the 
College of Health section of this Bulletin. 

Offerings for Non-Majors 

A number of courses offered within the School of Social Work do not have prerequisites and may be 
excellent choices for electives by non-majors. These courses include 

SWK 606 Social Justice and Social Policy 
S WK 663 Consultation and Supervision 

SWK 692 Special Problems (Grant Writing or Grief and Bereavement or Addictions or Social 
Development and Social Welfare in Jamaica) 

Degree Description 

Overview 

The MSW program, established in 1974 and the oldest graduate social work program in the state 
of Mississippi, features a 30-credit-hour advanced generalist concentration that builds upon a 30- 
credit-hour generalist foundation. An advanced standing MSW degree program exempts qualified 
and admitted applicants from taking foundation courses. 

Career Opportunities 

Career opportunities for well-prepared master 's-level social workers are extensive. Social workers 
provide social services to more people in Mississippi and across the United States than any other A .» 
professional group. Social work professionals use a wide variety of empirically based methods to 
help individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities solve a broad range of problems. 
Social work professionals are in demand in many human service arenas, including 

Home Health and Hospice Public Health 

Child and Family Welfare School Systems 

Mental Health . Early Childhood 

Substance Abuse Youth Services 

Family Violence Armed Forces 

Vocational Rehabilitation Gerontology 

Public Welfare Hospitals 

Corrections and Court Systems Employee Assistance 

Public Policy 



182 I College of Health 



iHf-'; 



Field Instruction 

Quality hands-on field instruction experiences (practica) are vital to graduate social work education. 
Students in the 60-credit-hour MSW program complete a minimum of 900 hours of field instruction. 
Students admitted to the advanced standing program complete a minimum of 450 hours of field 
instruction. Field placements are available to students in more than 130 social service agencies, 
located primarily in South Mississippi. While in field placement, students receive direct guidance 
and supervision from experienced field instructors who hold the MSW degree. Field placement 
courses include a required weekly seminar, and are graded on a pass/fail basis. 

Special Program Requirements 

Program Options. The school is offering four MSW program models at the Hattiesburg campus 
in academic year 2007-2008 for qualified applicants: a two-year, 60-credit-hour model, a three- 
year, 60-credit-hour model; a one-year, 30-credit-hour minimum advanced standing model; and an 
extended (four or five semester) 30-credit hour minimum advanced standing model. The three-year 
and extended advanced standing programs are designed primarily for employed practitioners. 

Semester of Admission. Two-year and three-year program students will only be admitted for fall 
semesters. Advanced standing students may be admitted in the summer or fall semesters. 

Application Deadline. Applications may be submitted any time. 

However, all admission requirements must be completed by March 15 to ensure application 
consideration for the following fall semester. 

Admission Criteria 

Applicants to the School of Social Work are evaluated and admitted without discrimination on the 
basis of age, gender, race, religion, color, creed, ethnic or national origin, disability, political, or 
sexual orientation. 

All applicants to the MSW program are evaluated and admitted on the basis of the following 
criteria: 

A. a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university 

B. a minimum of 12 semester hours of liberal arts coursework and a course in human biology 

C. the grade point average (GPA) on the last 60 hours of undergraduate coursework required by the 
Graduate School 

D. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores 

E. a written personal statement 

F. a written response to a case situation 

G. three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for 
graduate study 

Applications to the advanced standing program are evaluated on the basis of the additional criteria 
below: 

Advanced Standing. Qualified applicants to the MSW program who hold a BSW from an 
accredited program, or who have completed equivalent foundation curriculum coursework at an 
accredited school of social work, may be exempted from up to 30 credit hours of MSW foundation 
coursework. 

Applicants holding the BSW degree and applying for advanced standing must meet the following 
criteria: 

A. BSW degree from an accredited program conferred within the last five years 

B. minimum GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 hours of baccalaureate education 

C. minimum GPA of 3.5 in the undergraduate social work program overall, with a grade of B or better 
in all required social work courses 

D. GRE scores 

E. a passing score on a qualifying examination based on foundation curriculum content 

Eligibility of an applicant for advanced standing admission based on MSW foundation coursework 
completed at an accredited program other than Southern Miss is determined by the following: 

A. assessment of curriculum comparability by the MSW admissions committee 

B. a grade of B or better in all courses considered toward advanced standing 

C. a recommendation of the admissions committee and approval of the director 

D. compliance with other standard criteria for admission to the MSW program 

E. a passing score on the appropriate sections of a qualifying examination based on foundation 
curriculum content 



College of Health j 183 



Grade Point Average. For applicants to either the 60-credit-hour full-time or part-time MSW 
programs, the GPA on the last 60 hours of undergraduate coursework must be at least 2.5. For 
applicants to the 30-credit-hour advanced standing program, the GPA on the last 60 hours of 
undergraduate coursework must be at least 3.0 and the GPA for the undergraduate social work 
program must be at least 3.5. 

Graduate Record Examination. The GRE is required for admission. Applicants should schedule 
the exam so as to allow sufficient time for submission of exam scores by March 15; call l-(800)- 
473-2255, or access the GRE Web site at http://www.gre.org for details. 

Conditional Admission. The school adheres to university policies with regard to admission 
of graduate students on a conditional basis. The university regulations concerning conditional 
admission for full-time or part-time students are stated in this Bulletin under Admission 
Requirements and Procedures. 

Degree Progression Requirements. First-year students in the two-year 60-credit-hour model will 
be enrolled in classroom courses in each semester and in concurrent field instruction (practicum) in 
the spring and summer semesters of the first year. In the fall semester of the second year, students 
will take classroom courses only and in the spring semester will be placed in an advanced field 
practicum for four days each week. 

At least one classroom course will be taken during the spring semester concurrently with the 
advanced field practicum. All courses must be taken in accordance with a sequenced curriculum 
plan (see the model program below). 

Students in the 30-credit-hour advanced standing model will take classroom courses only during the 
fall semester. In the spring semester, students will be placed in an advanced field practicum for four 
days each week. Three classroom courses will be taken during the spring semester concurrently with 
the advanced field practicum. All courses must be taken in accordance with a sequenced curriculum 
plan (see model program below). 

Three-year program students are required to take nine hours each semester during the first year. 
All courses must be taken in accordance with a sequenced curriculum plan (see the model program 
below). A minimum of 60 credit hours is required for graduation. 

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and must achieve a grade of Pass in each field 
practicum. In compliance with university requirements, students are required to pass a written 
comprehensive examination in order to graduate; usually the examination is completed prior to 
taking advanced classes, and functions to qualify students for entrance to the advanced curriculum 
(second half of the program). A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Two- Year Program Model 
Semester I Fall 

SWK601 Human Behavior 1 3 

SWK 605 Social Welfare Policy 3 

SWK 608 Generalist Practice I 3 

SWK 610 Theoretical Bases 3 

SWK 617 Social Work Research I 3 

15 
Semester II Spring 

SWK 602 Human Behavior II 3 

SWK 609 Generalist Practice II '..' '. ..3 

SWK 634 Social Work Practice in a Diverse Society 3 

SWK 641 Field Education 1 3 

SWK Foundation Elective 3 

15 
Semester HI Summer 

SWK 642 Field Education II 3 

SWK 666 Community Development and Social Planning 3 

SWK Advanced Elective 3 

9 



m 



Pit' 



184 I College of Health 

Semester IV Fall 

SWK 635 Management and Administration 3 

SWK 653 Social Work Mental Health Assessment 3 

SWK 674 Social Work Practice with Families 3 

SWK 696 Social Work Practice with Groups 3 

12 
Semester V Spring 

SWK 658 Advanced Interactive Methods 3 

SWK 673 Field Education III 6 

9 

Minimum Total Credit Hours: 60 

Three- Year Program Model 
Semester I Fall 

SWK 601 Human Behavior 1 3 

SWK 605 Social Welfare Policy 3 

SWK 608 General ist Practice 1 3 

9 
Semester II Spring 

SWK 602 Human Behavior II 3 

SWK 609 Generalist Practice II 3 

SWK 634 Social Work Practice in a Diverse Society 3 

9 
Semester HI Summer 

SWK 617 Social Work Research 1 3 

SWK 641 Field Education 1 3 

6 
Semester IV Fall 

SWK 610 Theoretical Bases 3 

SWK 642 Field Education II 3 

6 
Semester V Spring 

SWK 666 Community Development and Social Planning 3 

SWK 674 Social Work Practice with Families 3 

SWK 696 Social Work Practice with Groups 3 

9 
Semester VI Summer 

SWK 635 Management and Administration 3 

SWK Electives 6 

9 
Semester VII Fall 

SWK 653 Social Work Mental Health Assessment 3 

SWK 673 Field Education III 3 

6 
Semester VIII Spring 

SWK 658 Advanced Interventive Methods 3 

SWK 673 Field Education III 3 

6 

Minimum Total Credit Hours 60 

One-Year Advanced Standing Program Model 
Semester I Fall 

SWK 635 Management and Administration 3 

SWK 653 Social Work Mental Health Assessment 3 

SWK 666 Community Development and Social Planning 3 

SWK 674 Social Work Practice with Families 3 

SWK 696 Social Work Practice with Groups ; .... .-... : ..3 

15 
Semester II Spring 

SWK 658 Advanced Interventive Methods 3 

SWK 673 Field Education III 6 

9 
Semester III Summer 
Electives 6 

6 



Minimum Total Credit Hours: 30 



College of Health |] 185 



Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences 

Brett E. Kemker, Interim Chair 

118 College Drive #5092 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-5216 

www.usm.edu/shs 

Berry, Buisson, Carlin, Cloud, Kemker, Muma, Oshrin, Schaub, Teller, Terrio 

The Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences offers programs leading to the Master of Arts, 
the Master of Science, and the Doctor of Audiology degrees. Master's degree emphases are in two 
principal areas: (1) speech-language pathology, and (2) education of the deaf. The doctoral degree 
is in Audiology. 

New graduate students are accepted by the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences in speech- 
language pathology or education of the deaf for the summer and fall semesters only. Audiology 
accepts students in the fall only Students must have regular admission status to register for 
practicum courses. 

Nondegree students are not permitted to register for courses in speech and hearing sciences without 
permission. 

Potential graduate students should refer to other sections of the Bulletin for information regarding 
admission requirements as set forth by the Graduate School. Regular admission to the master's and 
doctoral programs is based upon the previous academic records, submission of scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination, and three letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation should be 
from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the 
department. The size of the graduate program is limited by accreditation standards, and admission is 
made on a competitive basis. 

Students who do not qualify for regular admission may be admitted on conditional basis if space 
allows. Conditional students may be required to take additional coursework for graduation. In 
addition, a speech-language pathology student whose initial admission is on a conditional or 
nondegree basis may register for no more than one hour of clinical practicum during any semester of 
the graduate program. Conditional students whose grade point average is less than 3.0 after the first 
nine (9) hours or on all courses taken while meeting the nine (9) hour requirement will be dropped 
from the program. 

A major in speech-language pathology at the master's level requires a minimum of fifty-four (54) 
semester hours. The Master of Arts degree in Speech-Language Pathology requires a foreign language 
proficiency, thesis, four semester hours of clinical practicum, no less than 12 three-semester-hour 
courses, and the successful completion of a comprehensive examination. A 3.0 GPA is required for 
graduation. The master's comprehensive examination is the National Examination in Speech-Language 
Pathology and Audiology; the passing score for this year is 600. The Master of Science degree in 
Speech-Language Pathology requires four semester hours of clinical practicum, no less than 15 three- 
semester-hour courses, and the successful completion of a comprehensive examination. 

p,. ' * 
The Doctor of Audiology degree requires nine semesters of clinical practicum, a minimum of 24 three- \ 
semester-hour courses, completion of an extern residency successful completion of a doctoral research 
project, and the successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive examination. A 3.0 GPA is 



required for graduation. 

Residency 

Doctoral students must meet residency requirements in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study- Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Stud)' Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by tire end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
wivw.edu/giaduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



m 



itii 






186 I College of Health 



Master's Degree with Emphasis in Education of the Deaf 

The program leading to the master's degree with an emphasis in education of the deaf is 
individualized to the needs of the student. Specialization in education of the deaf may be pursued 
in a number of areas including pre-primary, elementary (grades 1-8), secondary, secondary special 
subject, or a specialty area. Selection of specialization areas is governed by the candidate's 
background, interests, and employment objectives. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

The master's degree program enables a student to qualify academically for a master's degree 
teaching certificate. However, some states may impose other requirements prior to an individual's 
obtaining compensation at the master's level. Mississippi requires a teacher to have two years 
of experience before being compensated at the master's degree level; thus, a person holding a 
master's degree but with no teaching experience must be paid at the bachelor's level until two 
years' experience has been obtained. The master's degree program with emphasis in education of 
the deaf is certified by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). This 
certification is reciprocal among approximately 40 states. 

Requirements differ from state to state, and it is the responsibility of the student to be aware of these 
differences. 

Master's Degree with Emphasis in Speech-Language Pathology 

The master's degree with emphasis in speech-language pathology is a clinical degree designed 
to meet the academic and practicum requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in 
Speech-Language Pathology awarded by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The 
following courses are to be taken by candidates for the master's degree in this emphasis area: SHS 
513, 516, 518, 519, 601, 642, 643, 644, 646, 648, 650, 687, 694, and/or 695, 702, 712, 716, 719. A 
3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Practicum Requirements 

A student in speech-language pathology or audiology must complete practicum in three different 
settings. Off-campus sites must be approved by the faculty adviser, and students must have a 
minimum grade point average of 3.0 before beginning off-campus practicum. 

Doctor of Audiology Degree 

The Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) degree is a clinical doctorate designed to meet the academic 
and practicum requirements for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology awarded by 
the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The following courses are to be taken by 
candidates for the Doctor of Audiology degree: SHS 528, 601, 621, 622, 623, 625, 688, 701, 703, 
706, 708, 709, 710, 718, 721, 722, 723, 724, 726, 730, 733, 743 and REF 602. Additional elective 
courses will be determined by the adviser and the department chair. A 3.0 GPA is required for 
graduation. 

Accreditation 

The master's degree program in speech-language pathology and the doctoral program in audiology 
are accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation of the American Speech-Language- 
Hearing Association, and are recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary Accreditation and the 
United States Office of Education. 

Admission Requirements for International Students 

In addition to meeting the requirements for admission stated in this Bulletin, international students 
are required to submit a TOEFL score of 560 and submission of scores from the GRE. 



College of Science and Technology 187 



College of Science and 
Technology 

Graduate Degrees 
2007-2008 



Department/School Major 



Degree 



Master's Level 

Administration of Justice 



Biological Sciences 



Administration of Justice 

Administration of Justice Emphasis 
Forensics Emphasis 
Juvenile Emphasis 

Biological Sciences 

Biological Sciences Emphasis 
Environmental Biology Emphasis 
Marine Biology Emphasis 
Microbiology Emphasis 
Molecular Biology Emphasis 



Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemistry 

Biochemistry Emphasis 
Chemistry Emphasis 



Master of Arts and 
Master of Science 



Master of Science 



Master of Science 



Coastal Sciences 



Computing 



Construction 



Economic and Workforce 
Development 

Geography and Geology 



Mathematics 
Marine Science 

Physics and Astronomy 



Coastal Sciences Master of Science 

Computer Science Master of Science 

Computational Science Emphasis 
Computer Science Emphasis 
Engineering Technology Emphasis 
Engineering Technology Master of Science 

Construction Management and 

Technology Emphasis 
Architecture Construction Visualization 

Emphasis 
Logistics Management and Technology 

Emphasis 



Economic Development 

Workforce Training and Development 



Geography 
Geology 

Geology Emphasis 

Professional Geology Emphasis 

Mathematics 

Marine Science 
Hydrographic Science 

Physics 

Computational Science Emphasis 
Physics Emphasis 
Polymer Physics Emphasis 



Master of Science 
Master of Science 



Master of Science 
Master of Science 



Master of Science 

Master of Science 
Master of Science 

Master of Science 



188 



College of Science and Technology 



Department/School Major 



Degree 



Polymers and High 
Performance Materials 



Science and 
Mathematics Education 



Doctoral Level 

Administration of Justice 

Biological Sciences 



Polymer Science 

Sports and High Performance 

Materials 



Master of Science 
Master of Science 



Science Education Master of Science 

Biology Emphasis 
Chemistry Emphasis 
Coastal Science Emphasis 
Earth and Environmental Science Emphasis 
Marine Science Emphasis 
Mathematics Emphasis 
Physics Emphasis 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Coastal Sciences 
Computing 

Economic and Workforce 
Development 

§j|il Geography and Geology 
Mathematics 

Marine Science 



Administration of Justice 

Biological Sciences 

Biological Sciences Emphasis 
Environmental Biology Emphasis 
Marine Biology Emphasis 
Microbiology Emphasis 
Molecular Biology Emphasis 

Chemistry 

Biochemistry Emphasis 
Chemistry Emphasis 

Coastal Sciences 

Computational Science 

Computer Science Emphasis 

Human Capital Development 
Geography 

Computational Science 
Mathematics Emphasis 

Marine Science 



Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Philosophy 

Doctor of Philosophy 



Physics and Astronomy 



Polymers and High 
Performance Materials 



Science and 
Mathematics Education 



Computational Science 
Physics Emphasis 



Polymer Science and Engineering 
Sports and High Performance 
Materials 



Doctor of Philosophy 



Doctor of Philosophy 
Doctor of Philosophy 



Science Education Doctor of Philosophy 

Biology Emphasis 
Chemistry Emphasis 
Coastal Science Emphasis 
Computer Science Emphasis 
Earth and Environmental Science Emphasis 
Marine Science Emphasis 
Mathematics Emphasis 
Medical Technology Emphasis 
Physics Emphasis 
Polymer Science Emphasis 



College of Science and Technology | 189 



College of Science and 
Technology 

Rex F. Gandy, Ph.D., Dean 

Joe B. Whitehead, Ph.D., Associate Dean 

118 College Drive #5165 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4883 

The College of Science and Technology offers degrees as outlined on the previous two pages. 
Please check each department/school section for specific admission, course, and graduation 
requirements as well as for descriptions of areas of specialization. In addition, present and 
prospective students should consult earlier sections of this Bulletin for the general Graduate School 
requirements and regulations that apply to all graduate programs and degrees. 

The Center for Science and Mathematics Education, in cooperation with the Departments 
of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Coastal Sciences, Computer Science 
and Statistics, Geology, Marine Sciences, Mathematics, Medical Technology, and Physics and 
Astronomy offers the M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in science and mathematics education with areas of 
specialization as indicated in the college's graduate degrees listing. These units also cooperate with 
the College of Education and Psychology to offer the coursework to support the MEd. and Ed.D. in 
secondary education with various science and mathematics specialization areas. 

The college offers the Ph.D. in Computational Science with emphasis in Computer Science, 
Computational Mathematics, and Computational Physics and an interdisciplinary minor in 
environmental science. Interested students may obtain a listing of the available courses from the 
chair of their department or graduate committee. 

The faculty members of the College of Science and Technology have organized numerous 
specialized centers and institutes, several of which address interdisciplinary issues. Brief 
descriptions of the principal ones follow. 

Gulf Coast Research Laboratory 

The Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) in Ocean Springs has offered summer courses in 
the marine sciences since 1947. More than 160 researchers, technical and support personnel, and 
students work on this campus; research emphasis areas include aquatic animal health, marine 
aquaculture, aquatic biodiversity, coastal ecology, fate and effects of environmental pollutants, and 
fisheries science. The GCRL is home to the Department of Coastal Sciences and the Center for 
Fisheries Research and Development. 



J. L. Scott Marine Education Center 

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina's destruction, the J. L. Scott Marine Education Center and 
Aquarium (Scott Aquarium) is now at an interim location at the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory in 
Ocean Springs, Mississippi. The suite of hands-on marine science education programs that earned 
the Scott Aquarium an international, award-winning reputation will continue to reach precollege 
teachers and students who participate in institutes, workshops, educational field programs, and day 
camps. 



Stennis Space Center 



The Stennis Space Center (SSC) is home to more oceanographers than any other location in 
the world. Students, staff, and faculty have the opportunity to interact with more than 1,000 
scientists, engineers, and technical personnel working at this site located near Bay St. Louis, 
Mississippi. Collaborations are possible with personnel at the Naval Research Laboratory, the Naval 
Oceanographic Office, the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration's National Data Buoy Center and National Marine Fisheries 
Service, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program, the U.S. Geological 



190 



College of Science and Technology 



Survey, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration laboratories, and other agencies. SSC is 
home to the Department of Marine Science, Center for Trace Analysis, and Hydrographic Science 
Research Center. 



Center for Molecular and Cellular Biosciences 

Gordon Cannon, Ph.D., Coordinator 
118 College Drive #5043 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601)266-4221 

This center is composed of scientists with expertise in the disciplines of biochemistry, microbiology, 
molecular biology, and molecular genetics. The center facilitates research in these areas by means 
of a weekly Journal Club, which reviews the current literature, and the Distinguished Scientists 
Seminar Series, which brings world-renowned researchers to the Hattiesburg campus. In addition, 
the center provides a forum for interaction among graduate and undergraduate students working in 
the laboratories of the participating faculty. Faculty currently associated with the center are members 
of the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Polymer Science, and 
Psychology. 



sllplp 



Innovation for Construction and Engineering 
Enhancement (ICEE) Center 

Tulio Sulbaran, Ph.D., Director 
118 College Drive #5137 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-6419 

The Innovation for Construction and Engineering Enhancement (ICEE) Center is a multi- 
disciplinary industrial, educational and research hub housed at The University of Southern 
Mississippi within the School of Engineering Technology The mission of ICEE is twofold: 

1) develop, implement and assess the latest educational technology for the 
architecture/engineering/construction community; and 

2) enhance the economic development of the construction industry through the use of the 
latest technologies and management tools. 

Individuals with background and/or interest in education, information technology or architecture/ 
engineering/construction are encouraged to contact the center to explore possible opportunities. 



Institute of Environmental Science 

Eyler Coates, Ph.D., Director 
118 College Drive #5137 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4896 

The Institute of Environmental Science assembles teams of researchers from all disciplines as 
needed to undertake applied research in the areas of environmental studies and renewable energy 
resources. Providing environmental expertise to the community is another major function of the 
institute. 



College of Science and Technology || 191 



Institute for Formulation Science 

Robert Y. Lochhead, Ph.D., Director 
118 College Drive #10076 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4868 

The Institute for Formulation Science supports and coordinates research in formulation science. The 
institute is an integral part of the College of Science and Technology' and functions in concert with 
the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. 

Institute for Justice Systems, Management, 
Research, and Training 

Lisa S. Nored, Interim Chair 
118 College Drive #5127 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4509 

The Institute provides consultation services for county jails, legal organizations, and law 
enforcement agencies. Additionally, the Institute serves as federally designated monitors/consultants 
and plans and sponsors statewide conferences for Youth Court judges and training school personnel. 



Mississippi Polymer Institute 

James Evans, Director 
118 College Drive #10003 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4607 

The Mississippi Polymer Institute was authorized by the Mississippi Legislature in 1983. The 
purpose of the institute is to conduct research designed to support the rapidly growing polymer 
industry in Mississippi by building the infrastructure and providing technical assistance. The 
institute is an integral part of the College of Science and Technology and functions in concert with 
the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. 

Department of Administration of Justice 

Lisa S. Nored, Interim Chair 

118 College Drive #5127 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4509 

Carlan, Lewis, Nored, Payne, Stevens 

The Department of Administration of Justice offers courses leading to a master of arts degree, a 
master of science degree, a doctor of philosophy degree, and a graduate minor in the master's and 
doctoral degree programs of other departments. 

Graduate Degree Programs 
Master of Arts Degree 

The Master of Arts in Administration of Justice consists of a minimum of thirty-three (33) hours 
of administration of justice coursework, or a minimum of twenty-four (24) hours of administration 
of justice coursework with nine (9) hours of additional coursework in an approved minor (with 18 
hours of 600 level or higher). Either sequence also requires six (6) hours of AJ 698, thesis, for a 
total of thirty-nine (39) hours. AJ 620 and AJ 625 are required. A foreign language competency is 
required. A comprehensive exam and a 3.0 GPA are required for graduation. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



■',;":. 



192 College of Science and Technology 



Master of Science Degree 

The Master of Science in Administration of Justice consists of a minimum of thirty-nine (39) hours 
of administration of justice coursework, or a minimum of thirty (30) hours of administration of 
justice coursework with nine (9) hours of additional coursework in an approved minor area, plus 
successful completion of a written comprehensive examination (with 18 hours at the 600 level or 
higher). The degree is designed to provide specialization in a designated emphasis area to meet 
professional needs. A J 620 and A J 625 are required in each emphasis area. A 3.0 GPA is required to 
graduate. 

Admission Requirements to the Master's Degrees/Programs 

1 . Admission decisions are based on a balancing of a variety of factors. These include scores on 
the verbal, quantitative, and analytical portions of the Graduate Record Examination's General Test 
and undergraduate grade point average (both overall and in administration of justice) and evidence 
of related field training and work experience. In addition, applicants are to submit for consideration 
three letters of recommendation from members of their undergraduate faculty and to have such 
faculty members forward examples of written work which they are able to identify as original 
work by the applicant submitted in their courses. The letters should be sent to the department. 

2. Applicants granted regular admission who have an undergraduate major in administration of 
justice, including nondegree graduate students, must have achieved a grade point average of 3.0 
overall and in their criminal justice courses. 

3. Applicants may be granted conditional admission in cases where other than grade point averages 
indicate. In these cases the department may, at its discretion, grant conditional admission to 
undergraduate administration of justice majors and nondegree graduate students in administration 
of justice with a GPA of less than 3.0 but more than 2.75 overall and in administration of justice 
courses. 

4. Applicants who are not administration of justice undergraduate majors, who meet all other 
criteria, may be granted conditional admission if the department is satisfied that their grade point 
average overall and in their particular major indicates the potential to perform acceptably in the 
program. Students should see the appropriate graduate adviser for requirements to achieve regular 
admission. 

5. All prospective students with other than an administration of justice undergraduate major or 
strong professional training in administration of justice will be admitted conditionally until after 
completion of twelve (12) hours of undergraduate administration of justice courses with a B or 
better in each course. These course hours are AJ 325, AJ 330, AJ 352 and either AJ 341 or AJ 
360. All such supplemental undergraduate work must be completed prior to beginning graduate 
coursework. 

6. Students from all underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged to apply. 

Required courses are listed below. Duplicated work is not permitted. A student may not take for 
graduate credit a similar course for which the student earlier received undergraduate credit of B or 
better. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



I. Administration of Justice 

AJ620 AJ582 AJ 560 AJ 550 A J 698 
AJ533 AJ600 AJ 625 AJ 530 AJ 535 

Selection of the juvenile justice specialty entails completion of sixty (60) hours of coursework 
in order to comply with state policy and federal court orders governing state employees of the 
Department of Youth Services (18 at the 600 level or higher). An included minor of eighteen (18) 
hours of coursework is required in psychology, counseling psychology, or social work. Courses may 
be selected from the following: 



College of Science and Technology |j 193 



II. Juvenile Justice 

AJ620 
AJ 560 
AJ571 
AJ625 


AJ535 
AJ561 
AJ582 
AJ650 


AJ550 
AJ563 
AJ600 
AJ660 


PSY 532 
PSY 612 
PSY 614 
PSY 711 
PSY 732 


PSY 611 
PSY 613 
PSY 630 
PSY 714 
PSY 738 



Master of Science Degree - Forensic Science 

The Master of Science in Forensic Science within the Department of Administration of Justice 
consists of a minimum of thirty (30) hours of coursework to include six hours of research 
culminating in a defensible Thesis project. Areas of interest include biology, chemistry, physics, 
criminalistics, administration of justice and anthropolgy. Eighteen (18) hours of graduate courses 
taken must be at the 600 level or higher. The degree is designed to provide specialization in a 
designated area of interest to meet professional needs. A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

Admission Requirements to the Master's Degrees/Programs: 

1 . Admission decisions are based on a balancing of a variety of factors. These include competitive 
scores on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Gradaute Record Examination's General Test 
and undergraduate grade point average (both overall and in undergradaute natural science courses). 
In addition, applicants are to submit in writing a general essay concerning their research interest 
within their emphasis area along with three letters of recommendation from members of their 
undergraduate faculty or employers. The letters of recommendation should be sent directly to the 
department by the respective faculty members. 

2. Applicants gradnted regular admission that have an undergraduate major in a non-natural science 
must have achieved a grade point average of 3.0 overall and in their respective field of study. Any 
deficiencies noted for successful completion of the degree program must be addressed prior to the 
student continuing with formal coursework toward their degree. 

3. Applicants may be granted conditional admission in cases where qualifications for success other 
than grade point averages indicate. In these cases, the department may, at its discretion, grant 
conditional admission to undergraduates. Students admitted under conditional admission must 
maintain a 3.0 GPA in all course work and remove any deficiencies during the first two semesters. 

4. Students from all underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged to apply. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan cf Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 

Program Requirements 

Students must meet the general requirements set forth in the Graduate School of the University of 
Southern Mississippi. A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. Other major additional requirements are 
listed below: 



Student must arrange for a graduate adviser in their emphasis area by the end of the first semester. 

Submit a written thesis prospectus for approval by a three-member thesis graduate committee by 

the end of the second semester. 

Pass a comprehensive oral and/or written examination by the end of the fourth semester. 

Meet continuous enrollment requirements of the graduate school. 



lii. 

Ism 
mm 

§if€!s 



194 | College of Science and Technology 



Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The Doctor of Philosophy in Administration of Justice is designed to prepare students for productive 
careers as teachers and practitioners of justice administration and research. This doctoral degree 
is normally taken after a student has earned a master's degree, but exceptional students who 
have earned only a baccalaureate degree are admitted to the doctoral track at the discretion of 
the Doctoral Admissions Committee: and in both cases applicants must meet all university and 
departmental requirements for regular admission. 

Admission Requirements 

The Doctoral Admissions Committee uses a wide range of criteria, including scores on the GRE, 
grade point averages, letters of recommendation, experience in justice administration and related 
fields, the nature of proposed dissertation topics, and - in the case of applicants whose native 
language is not English - a score on the TOEFL examination indicating a high level of proficiency in 
English language when making admission decisions. Applicants must possess an approved master's 
thesis or equivalent written research project. Letters of recommendation should be from persons 
qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department. 

Degree requirements include: 

1 . a minimum of eighty-four (84) semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree or fifty-four (54) 
semester hours beyond the master's degree, with a minimum of thirty (30) semester hours 
completed in specified 600- and 700-level coursework in administration of justice (AJ) and the 
remainder in approved cognates. A minimum grade of B is required in each course credited toward 
the degree. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

2. a qualifying examination administered by the AJ graduate committee within twelve months of 
admission. 

3. research tool(s). A combination of coursework which may include proficiency in a foreign 
language, statistics, or computer science as determined by the department. 

4. a written comprehensive examination 

5. presentation and oral defense of dissertation (12 hours of 898 required) 

6 residency. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

7. continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Precise details of the standards for admission and of curricular matters are available from the 
director of doctoral studies in the Department of Administration of Justice. 



Graduate Minor in Administration of Justice 

The graduate minor in administration of justice consists of at least nine (9) hours of graduate 
coursework for the master's and twelve (12) hours for the doctorate, at least six (6) hours of which 
must be taken at The University of Southern Mississippi for either master's or doctorate. Approval 
of the minor and the courses is at the discretion of the major adviser. 

Applicants may be granted regular or conditional admission. 

Regular Admission: 

1. The applicant must hold a master's degree or juris doctorate (JD) from an institution approved by 
a recognized accrediting agency. 

2. A competitive GRE score on the verbal and quantitative sections. 

3. A GPA or 3.5 or greater on prior graduate course work. 

4. Successful completion of prior course work in research methodology at least equivalent to that 
required by the USM B.A., M.S. degrees in Administration of Justice (namely Methods of Criminal 
Justice Research and Planning AJ 420/ 520, Advanced Research Methods for Administration of 



College of Science and Technology f 195 



Justice AJ620, and Seminar in Administration of Justice Planning and Research AJ 625); 

5. Successful prior course work in the theory of justice (criminal jurisprudence as well as 
criminology) at least equivalent to that required by the USM B.A. degree in Administration of 
Justice, Criminal Justice Theory AJ 325; 

6. Successful prior course work or professional experience confirming expertise in substantive 
and procedural criminal law and justice administration at least equivalent to that required by the 
USM B.A. in Administration of Justice, Namely Criminal Law (AJ 330), Criminal Procedure (AJ 
430/530), Evidence, Search and Seizure (AJ 433/533), Introduction to Modern Corrections (AJ 
352), and Introduction to Juvenile Justice (AJ 360); 

Regular admission requires no course work above the semester hour minimum for the doctorate 
outline above. 

Conditional Admission: 

Conditional admission may be granted when an applicant's credentials suggest aptitude for 
successful doctoral study but are deficient in one or more of the six prerequisite areas outlined 
immediately above provided student possesses a GPA of at least 3.25. If a student lacks an 
approved master's thesis, student must provide a researchable proposal: (including a literature 
search, methodology, and references in an APA format), approved by an Administration of Justice 
graduate faculty member before the end of the first conditional semester. Hence conditional 
admission requires a variable amount of preliminary course work above the minimal semester-hour 
requirement for the doctorate outlined as a condition of regular admission, the amount of such 
source work being determined by the Graduate Committee. 

Department of Biological Sciences 

Frank R. Moore, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5018 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4748 

Alford, Beckett, Biesiot, Curry, Davis, Deng, Elasri, Ellender, Giio, Hairston, Jawor, Kreiser, Kuehn, f~|| 

Middlebroohs, Moore, Pessoney, Quails, Santangelo, Schaefer, Shearer, Wang 

The Department of Biological Sciences offers graduate degrees with emphases in environmental g 

biology, marine biology, microbiology, and molecular biology. BSC courses cross-listed as MAR m 

courses are generally taught at the university's Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (GCRL) in the p 

Department of Coastal Sciences (COA) at Ocean Springs, Miss. A COA faculty member may g 
function as a student's major professor. 

Admission Requirements 

Granting of regular admission to the graduate program in the Department of Biological Sciences is 
based on the following criteria: 

1. suitability of the student to pursue research in the department. Applicants must submit a written 
letter or essay specifying their research interests and career goals. Acceptance of the applicant is 
dependent on the availability of a faculty member to direct the student's research and to mentor 
the student through the program, and the availability of research facilities to carry out the student's 
research. Because of the critical nature of the student-faculty mentor relationship, applicants are 
strongly encouraged to contact potential faculty advisers prior to application. 

2. student records. Admission to the program is selective and specifications concerning grade point 
average in the front section of this Bulletin are used as a guideline in the selection process. 

3. results from the general section of the Graduate Record Examination. 

4. letters of recommendation. Three letters of recommendation should be sent to the department. The 
department will not begin its review of the application until the three letters of recommendation 
and essay of research interests (described above) have been received. 

Because more qualified applicants are received than can be accepted, admission to the department's 
program is very selective. 

Conditional admission to departmental programs is considered only for students who meet Graduate 
School standards for conditional admission and who are sponsored by a member of the faculty of 
the department. The sponsor must provide a written statement indicating willingness to serve as the 
applicant's major professor. 






196 |] College of Science and Technology 



The target dates for receipt of applications for admission for the fall and spring semesters are 
February 15 and September 15, respectively. All applications received after these dates will be 
considered if space is available or will be considered for the next term. Applications for teaching 
assistantships will be considered beginning February 15 as well. 

Master of Science Degree 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of thirty (30) graduate hours with a 3.0 GPA is required for this degree (18 hours must 
be at the 600 level or higher). Students must meet the general requirements set forth by the Graduate 
School of The University of Southern Mississippi. A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. The following 
are major additional requirements. 

1 . Arrange for a graduate adviser by the end of the second semester. 

2. Gain approval of a written prospectus from a three-member graduate thesis committee by the end 
of the third semester. 

3. Pass a comprehensive examination (oral and/or written) by the end of the fourth semester. 

4. Gain approval of a written thesis and successfully defend the thesis at an advertised research 
seminar open to the public by the end of the third year. 

5. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



Program Requirements 

A minimum of eighty-four (84) graduate hours beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of 
fifty-four (54) graduate hours beyond the master's degree with a 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 
Students must meet the general requirements set forth by the Graduate School of The University of 
Southern Mississippi. The following are major additional requirements. 

1 . Arrange for a graduate adviser by the end of the second semester. 

2. Gain approval of a written prospectus from a five-member doctoral committee by the end of the 
fourth semester. 

3. Provide an annual research progress report to the doctoral committee after completion of 
prospectus. 

4. Pass a comprehensive examination (oral and written) by the end of the sixth semester. 

5. Fulfill the Research Tools requirement as specified by the student's doctoral committee and approved by 
the chair of the department. 

6. Gain approval of a dissertation and successfully defend the dissertation at an advertised research seminar 
open to the public by the end of the fifth year (for students with an M.S. degree) or sixth year (for students 
without an M.S. degree). (12 hours of 898 are required) 

7. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

8 Residency - meet residency requirements in the front section of this Bulletin. 



College of Science and Technology J 197 



Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 

Robert C. Bateman, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5043 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601)266-4701 

Bateman, Butko, Cannon, Evans, Heinhorst, Holder, Hoyle, Huang, Lowe, Masterson, McCormick, Miao, 

Phillips, Pojman, Scltanz, Stevenson, Wallace, Wltitehead 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants wishing to enter either the master of science degree program or the doctor of philosophy 
degree program within the department must satisfy the requirements of the Office of Graduate 
Studies. Among those factors considered in the admission decision are the GPA, submission of 
test scores on the GRE, and three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the 
candidate's readiness for graduate study. Letters should be sent to the department. Students whose 
native language is not English must achieve a score of 590 or above on the TOEFL exam. 

Master of Science Degree 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers the master of science with specialization in 
analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, and biochemistry. The M.S. programs jointly emphasize 
area coursework and research/thesis. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatcstudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

The master's program requires a minimum of thirty (30) hours with a 3.0 GPA (18 hours must be at 
the 600 level or higher). Placement examinations to identify deficiencies and to indicate remedial 
studies to remedy these deficiencies, and participation in the seminar program are required for the 
M.S. degrees, along with specific but flexible coursework programs. Completion of a comprehensive 
examination in the student's area of specialization and a 3.0 GPA are required to graduate. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers the doctor of philosophy with specialization 
in analytical, inorganic, organic, physical, and biochemistry. The Ph.D. programs emphasize 
excellence in research. Qualified students holding a bachelor of science are encouraged to enter 
directly into the doctoral program. Individuals who are adequately prepared may take the qualifying 
examination at the beginning of their first semester of graduate work, but in no case can it be 
postponed beyond the second semester of graduate work. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

The Ph.D. programs require eighty-four (84) graduate hours beyond the bachelor's degree or fifty- 
four (54) graduate hours beyond the master's degree with a 3.0 GPA. Specific course requirements 
depend upon individual needs and are selected with the advice of the student's research director and 
doctoral committee. 

Among other requirements are 

1 . completion and oral defense of a research prospectus 

2. completion of a Ph.D. comprehensive examination 

3. Participation in the seminar program 



198 j College of Science and Technology 



4. Research Tools: 

PHI 735 (Research Ethics), CHE 500 (Chemical Literature), and CHE 510 (Chemical Safety). 

5. completion of a substantial research project and successful oral defense of a dissertation (12 hours 
of 898 are required) 

6. Residency. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

7. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 



Department of Coastal Sciences 



JeffLotz, Ph.D., Chair 

P.O. Box 7000 

Ocean Springs, MS 39566-7000 

Jeff.Lotz(S)usm.edu 



Kalin Lloyd, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

P.O. Box 7000 

Ocean Springs, MS 39566-7000 

(228) 872-4201 

kalin.b.lloyd@usm.edu 



Biber, Brouwer, Campbell, Comyns, Dillon, Fulford, Grimes, Hawkins, Heard, Lotz, Otvos, Overstreet, 
Peterson, Rakocinski 

The Department of Coastal Sciences offers both the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
in Coastal Sciences. Given the interdisciplinary nature of this department, students interested 
in pursuing a degree in coastal sciences should develop a strong background and working 
knowledge in the basic sciences. Experience with computers and a basic background in statistics is 
recommended. 

Master of Science Degree 

The Department of Coastal Sciences offers a Master of Science in Coastal Sciences with 
specialization in a wide range of subdisciplines including aquaculture, coastal ecology, biodiversity 
and systematics, coastal geology, estuarine and marine botany, fisheries ecology, geochemistry, 
parasites and diseases, and toxicology. Knowledge deficiencies will be corrected through completion 
of elective courses as determined by the student's three-member graduate committee. 



Admission Requirements 

Granting of regular admission to the master of science degree program is based on several criteria, 
including but not limited to the following: 

1 ) submission of complete undergraduate transcript(s). Regular admission to the master of science 
degree program requires a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.75 in the last two years of 
undergraduate credit, a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in a science-based major, and an overall GPA 
of 3.0 or above; 

2) submission of results of the general section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 
Successful applicants have highly competitive scores; 

3) a letter of intent stating interests and career goals as well as three letters of recommendation. The 
letters of recommendation should be from people qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for 
graduate study and should be sent to the department. The department will not initiate its review 
of an application until the letter of intent and letters of recommendation are provided. The letter 
of intent is used as an example of the applicant's writing and communication skills, and provides 
information concerning the compatibility of the applicant's interests with departmental research 
interests. The letter of intent and letters of recommendation should be sent to the Department of 
Coastal Sciences, Attention: Coordinator of Graduate Studies, 

4) a minimum score of 560 on the paper test or 220 on the computer test is required on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for applicants whose native language is not English. 

Because more qualified students apply to the Department of Coastal Sciences than can be accepted, 
admission is selective and a complete application must be submitted. 

Conditional admission to the Department of Coastal Sciences is considered for students who meet 
Graduate School standards for conditional admission and who are sponsored by a member of the 
faculty of Coastal Sciences. The sponsor must provide a written statement indicating willingness 
to serve as the applicant's major professor. Conditional students cannot obtain a departmental 
assistantship but can be awarded a research stipend from a major professor's grant. 



College of Science and Technology I 199 



Conditionally admitted students must maintain a 3.0 GPA for the first nine (9) hours of formal 
coursevvork numbered 500 and above or on all coursework taken while meeting this nine (9)-hour 
requirement, not including research hours and only including up to three (3) hours of Special 
Problems. If this requirement is not met, the student is not allowed to remain in the program. Upon 
recommendation of the department chair and approval by the graduate dean, the conditionally 
admitted student may have his or her admission status changed to "regular admission." 

Students wishing to be considered for a limited number of graduate assistantships for the academic 
year beginning in the fall semester must have their completed application package to the Office of 
Graduate Studies no later than February 15. All applications for admission reviewed after this date 
will be considered if space is available, or will be placed in consideration for the next term. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

A minimum of thirty (30) graduate hours is required for this degree. Students must meet the general 
requirements of the Graduate School of The University of Southern Mississippi. Students advance to 
candidacy for the M.S. degree by completing the entire program of study (projection of coursework 
taken during tenure in Coastal Sciences; see below) developed in consultation with their graduate 
committee with a 3.0 grade point average or above, completing an approved thesis prospectus, and 
successfully passing the oral or written thesis comprehensive examination or both. 

The following list describes major additional requirements: 

1 . Choose a major professor and establish a three-member graduate thesis committee by the end of 
the second semester in residency; 

2. Develop a program of study in consultation with a major professor and thesis committee by the end 
of die second semester of residency. Graduate students cannot accumulate more than two Cs; 

3. Submit a research prospectus approved by the graduate thesis committee by the end of the third 
semester in residency; 

4. Pass an oral or written comprehensive examination or both by the end of the third semester in 
residency (administered by the thesis committee); and ? . > bs: 

5. Present an acceptable copy of the thesis to the graduate thesis committee at least 10 days prior to a 

public defense of the thesis at a publicly announced meeting. (See Thesis Timetable at ^^» 

www.usm.edu/gradautestudies.) A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

6. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of [S 
this Bulletin. 

Program of Study 

Hours L'i'v- ■.. '.. 

COA691 Research in Coastal Sciences 6 

COA 698 Thesis 6 

Electives (Determined by major adviser and advisory committee)** 18 

**COA 697 - Independent Study and Research, COA 698 - Thesis and research do not count toward 
this 18 credit hours of electives for the M.S. degree. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The Department of Coastal Sciences offers a Doctor of Philosophy in Coastal Sciences with 
specialization in a wide range of subdisciplines including aquaculture, coastal ecology, biodiversity 
and systematics, coastal geology, estuarine and marine botany, fisheries ecology, geochemistry, 
parasites and diseases, and toxicology. The Ph.D. program emphasizes excellence in research. 
Knowledge deficiencies will be corrected through enrollment in elective courses as determined by 
the student's four-member graduate committee. 

Qualified students holding a bachelor's degree (B.S./B.A.) or M.S. degree in a relevant field of 
science are encouraged to apply for admission. 



|g!4 



200 | College of Science and Technology 



Admission Requirements 

Granting of regular admission to the doctor of philosophy degree program is based on several 
criteria, including but not limited to the following: 

1. Regular admission to the doctor of philosophy degree program requires consideration of the 
undergraduate overall GPA of 3.0 in a science-based major and a minimum GPA of 3.5 on all 
previous graduate work; 

2. Submission of results of the general section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 
Successful applicants have highly competitive scores, 

3. A letter of intent stating interests and career goals as well as three letters of recommendation 
from people qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study should be sent to 
the department or school. The department will not initiate its review of an application until the 
letter of intent and letters of recommendation are provided. The letter of intent is used as a sample 
of the applicant's writing and communication skills, and provides information concerning the 
compatibility of the applicant's interests with departmental research interests. These should be sent 
to the Department of Coastal Sciences coordinator of Graduate Studies; and 

4. A minimum score of 560 on the paper test or 220 on the computer test is required on die Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for applicants whose native language is not English. 

Because more qualified students apply to the Department of Coastal Sciences than can be accepted, 
admission is selective and a complete application must be submitted. 

Conditional admission to the Department of Coastal Sciences is considered for students who meet 
Graduate School standards for conditional admission and who are sponsored by a member of 
the faculty of the Department of Coastal Sciences. The sponsor must provide a written statement 
indicating willingness to serve as the applicant's major professor. Conditional students can not 
obtain a departmental assistantship but can be awarded a research stipend from a major professor's 
grant. 

Conditionally admitted students must maintain a 3.25 GPA for the first nine (9) hours of formal 
coursework numbered 600 and above or on all coursework taken while meeting this requirement, 
not including research hours and only including up to three (3) hours of Special Problems. If this 
requirement is not met, the student is not allowed to remain in the program. Upon recommendation 
of the departmental chair and approval by the graduate dean, the conditionally admitted student may 
have their admission status changed to "regular admission." 

Students wishing to be considered for a limited number of graduate assistantships for the academic 
year beginning in the fall semester must have their completed application package to The Graduate 
Studies Office no later than February 15. All applications for admission reviewed after this date will 
be considered if space is available, or will be placed in consideration for the next term. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



Program Requirements 

A minimum of eighty-four (84) hours beyond a B.S./B.A. degree or a minimum of fifty-four (54) 
graduate hours beyond the M.S. degree is required for this degree. Students must meet the general 
requirements of the Graduate School of The University of Southern Mississippi. Students advance to 
candidacy for the Ph.D. degree by completing the entire program of study (projection of coursework 
taken during tenure in coastal sciences; see below) developed in consultation with their graduate 
committee with a 3.0 grade point average or above, completing an approved dissertation prospectus, 
and successfully passing the written and oral comprehensive examinations. 

The following list describes major additional requirements: . . 

1. Choose a major professor and establish a four-member graduate doctoral committee by the 
beginning of the third semester in residency; 

2. Develop a program of study (projection of coursework taken during tenure in Coastal Sciences) in 
consultation with major professor and dissertation committee by the end of the third semester of 
residency. Graduate students cannot accumulate more than two Cs; 

3. Research Tool(s). The Ph D. program requires that the student's Ph.D. committee will convene and 
examine the student's academic background and progress to date and will together develop a set of 
research tools based on the student's goals. These research tools will not exceed a total of 15 hours 
in addition to the core courses and other degree requirements 



College of Science and Technology j 201 



4. The student will present a prospectus defense to his/her graduate committee to demonstrate an 
adequate depth of knowledge and ability to conduct research and pursue die Ph.D. program. For 
full-time students, this requirement will normally be fulfilled by the end of the second year of the 
student's program; 

5. Pass an oral and written comprehensive examination by the end of die sixth semester in residency, 
which is administered by the doctoral committee; and 

6. Present an acceptable copy of the dissertation to the graduate doctoral committee at least 10 days 
prior to a public defense of the dissertation at a publicly announced meeting. (See Dissertation 
Timetable in front section of tliis Bulletin.) 

7. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

8. Residency. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in the Bulletin. 

9. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Program of Study 

Hours 

COA791 Research in Coastal Sciences 16 

COA 898 Dissertation 12 

Research Tools 15 

Electives (Determined by major adviser and advisory committee)** 1 1 

**COA 797 - Independent Study and Research, COA 898 - Dissertation and research do not count 
toward the twenty-six (26) hours of electives for the Ph.D. The above courses account for the 
minimum fifty-four (54) hours required for the Ph.D. for students entering with a M.S. degree. The 
additional thirty (30) hours of required electives for students entering with a B.S./B.A. degree are 
selected by the graduate student in consultation with the major adviser and the student's advisory 
committee. 



School of Computing 



Adel Lotfy Ali, Ph.D., Director 

118 College Drive #5106 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4949 

A., Ali, D. Ali, Buchannon, Surge, Burgess, El-Sawi, Leybourne, Murali, Nagurney, Perkins, Rimes, Seyfarth, 

Strelzoff, Sun, Yenduri, Zand, Zhang 

The School of Computing offers the Ph.D. in Computational Science with emphasis in Computer Science, 

Master of Science in Computer Science, Master of Science in Engineering Technology, and die Master of 

Science in Computer Science with an emphasis in computational science. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Computational Science - Emphasis in 
Computer Science 

Admission Requirements 

Students expecting regular admission to the program should hold a bachelor's or master's degree 
in computer science, or a bachelor's or master's degree in another discipline, with demonstrated 
proficiency in the areas of computer architecture, data structures and algorithms, and software 
design. Students should possess a grade point average of at least 3.5 on all graduate work attempted. 
Prospective students should submit scores from the General section of the Graduate Record 
Examination and three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the student's 
readiness for doctoral student. Letters should be sent to the department. 

Degree Requirements 

Students expecting regular admission to the program should hold a bachelor's or master's degree in 
computer science, 

A minimum of eighty-four (84) graduate semester hours beyond the bachelor's degree or fifty-four 
(54) graduate semester hours beyond the master's is required for the degree. A 3.0 GPA is required to 
graduate. All students in the program are required to complete a curriculum consisting of the following 
courses: 



202 j College of Science and Technology 



Research Tools courses: COS 701 (Visualization Techniques), COS 702 (Data Analysis 
Techniques), COS 703 (Data Handling Techniques) 

Core courses: CSC 726 (Advanced Computer Architecture), CSC (Advanced Computing 
Algorithms), CSC 733, (Advanced Distributed Database Systems), CSC 730 (Parallel and 
Distributed Computing), COS 898-12 hrs (Dissertation) 

Following completion of these courses, a student will form his or her doctoral committee. The doctoral 
committee shall consist of five members. A minimum of three members must be faculty of the School 
of Computing; a minimum of one member must be a faculty member of a USM Computational 
Science program, and one member may consist of any qualified faculty member with expertise in a 
mathematical or scientific discipline A student's committee will assist the student in selecting courses 
for the remaining required hours, in accordance with the student's specific skill requirements and 
research interests. Courses may be selected from both Computer Science offerings, as well as from 
relevant courses of other departments. Students must write and orally defend a dissertation - 12 hours 
of 898 are required. 

Students entering the program with a bachelor's degree may elect to earn a master's degree 
in Computer Science while enrolled in the Ph.D. program by utilizing track 2 of the program 
requirements for a Master of Science degree in Computer Science. 700-level courses taken as part of 
the master's degree requirements can not be counted as hours toward the Ph.D. degree. Core courses 
taken in conjunction with the correspondingly numbered master's level courses can not be counted as 
hours toward the Ph.D degree, but they count for satisfying the core knowledge requirement. For more 
details, refer to the Master of Science Program in Computer Science in this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



II 



Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement 

Students must meet the enrollment requirement specified in this Bulletin and the requirements of 
The Graduate Studies Office. 



Other Requirements 

Students must meet the requirements of the Graduate School of The University of 
Southern Mississippi. They are required, additionally, to pass a comprehensive examination 
covering the core CSC curriculum, to submit a formal prospectus that has been approved by the 
doctoral committee, and to present an acceptable copy of the dissertation to the doctoral committee 
at least fourteen (14) calendar days prior to the defense of the dissertation. This defense will take 
place at an advertised research seminar, open to members of the university community. 

Comprehensive and Qualifying Examinations 

To remain in good standing in the program, each student , upon completion of the core curriculum, 
must take and pass a comprehensive examination. The examination, which is normally administered 
in the spring and fall of each year, consists of four sections covering the four corresponding areas 
of the core curriculum, and is prepared by a committee of computer science faculty. Students must 
register for the examination two months prior to the examination date and will have one, and only 
one, additional opportunity to pass the examination, retaking only those sections of the examination 
that they failed to pass at the first sitting. The opportunity to try the examination a second time 
must be exercised no later that the corresponding semester in the year immediately following the 
first attempt. Students failing to pass all sections of the examination after the second try will be 
dismissed from the program. 



Master of Science Degree in Computer Science 

For the M.S. degree in computer science, a minimum of thirty-three (33) hours of graduate work 
is required. Of these hours, at least 21 must be computer science courses (non-thesis/project) 
numbered 600 or above. In addition, a student will complete either a thesis (6 hours) or a project (3 
hours) in computer science. A comprehensive exam and a 3.0 GPA are required for graduation. 



College of Science and Technology | 203 



The master's program is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of theoretical and applied 
computer science that will allow the student to begin exploring special topics and state-of-the-art 
subjects. It will prepare a student for advanced applications, development, and research positions in 
industry or for doctoral-level studies. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the entrance requirements set forth by the Graduate School of The University 
of Southern Mississippi, the student must be admitted by the departmental admissions committee on 
a regular or conditional basis. Students must submit scores on the Graduate Record Examination and 
transcripts of all undergraduate work. During the past year, successful applicants have had a mean 
GPA of 3.43. Applicants are required to submit three letters of recommendation by professionals 
in computer/computational science qualified to assess the student's readiness for graduate study. 
Letters should be sent to the department. In addition, applicants are encouraged to submit additional 
information that documents their potential for doing graduate work in computer/computational science. 
This would include industrial work experience and training and graduate work already completed. 
Students with minor deficiencies may be granted conditional admission. 

For students who do not come from an undergraduate program where the courses clearly equate with 
the Southern Miss courses, the graduate admissions committee will review a students' transcripts 
and decide which, if any, requirements can be met with undergraduate courses. A student will not 
be granted regular admission to the computer/computational science graduate program until those 
requirements are met. See the general policies of the Graduate School for further requirements of 
conditional admission for students. 

Credit will NOT be given toward the master's degree for any course taken to absolve deficiencies, 
meet admission requirements, or fulfill undergraduate prerequisite courses. 

The student must select a three-person advisory committee. The chair of this committee must be 
from the School of Computing (one member may be from outside the School of Computing). 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

1. completion of prerequisites. A student applying for admission will normally have a B.S. degree 
from a computer science or closely related program. Minimum coursework required for admission 
includes the equivalent of CSC 101, 102, 203, 204, 205, 306, 307, 308, 414, and three courses 
from among the following: CSC 305, 410, 411, 412, 413, and 415 (see the Southern Miss 
Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletins for course descriptions) and mathematics through integral 
calculus, basic probability, discrete math, and linear algebra. 

2. completion of CSC 5 1 3 if the student has not completed CSC 4 1 3 

3. completion of on of the following tracks: 
Track 1: 

a) completion of 33 hours of graduate coursework to include the following set of core courses. 
CSC 616, CSC 623, CSC 626 and three courses from among the following: CSC 620, CSC 624, 
CSC 630, CSC 632, CSC 633, and CSC 638. Students may substitute CSC 620 for CSC 616, in the 
set of core courses, if they have credit for the equivalent of CSC 415. 

b) satisfactory completion of a thesis (6 hours credit) or a project (3 hours credit) 
Track 2: 

completion of 33 hours of coursework to include the following set of core courses: CSC 726, CSC 
730, CSC 733, CSC 738 and the following courses: (CSC 620, CSC 623) 

4. satisfactory completion of a final comprehensive examination 

5. 3.0 GPA required for graduation 

6. continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Master of Science in Computer Science with an Emphasis in 
Computational Science 

The department also awards an M.S. degree with an emphasis in computational science. A degree 
plan for this emphasis area must include a common core of courses taken from the School of 
Computing and the departments of Mathematics, and Physics and Astronomy. 



204 j College of Science and Technology 



Admission Requirements 

See admissions requirements in the above section. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements 

1. completion of prerequisites. A student applying for admission will normally have a B.S. degree 
from a computer science, mathematics, physics, or closely related program. Minimum course work 
required for admission includes the equivalent of CSC 101, CSC 102, CSC 307, MAT 385, MAT 
326, and PHY 351 or PHY 361 . 

2. completion of at least 36 hours of graduate work with a 3.0 GPA ( 1 8 hours must be at the 600 level 
or higher) 

3. completion of the computational science core courses 

4. satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination 

5. continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 



sin 



13 



wMM 



Master of Science in Engineering Technology 

The School of Computing offers a program leading to the Master of Science in Engineering 
Technology with specialization in electronics/computer, engineering technology, and information 
technology. The degree can be obtained through research thesis, significant project, or coursework 
options. Advanced study in industrial use of computers includes computer-aided drafting (CAD), 
computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM), robotics, 
and virtual reality. Electronics and computer systems courses focus upon the introduction and 
implementation of state-of-the-art technology. Students are encouraged to develop degree plans that 
include technical electives in management, computer science, mathematics, environmental science, 
and related academic disciplines to prepare themselves for leadership roles in high technology 
industries. 

Admission Requirements 

For regular admission, students must have an undergraduate degree from an ABET accredited 
program or from a closely related program and a minimum 2.75 GPA. Students must submit test 
scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) and three (3) letters of recommendation. Letters of recommendation should be from 
persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the 
department or school. Students whose native language is not English must achieve a TOEFL score 
of 575 or higher. 



Conditional admission may be granted to students who do not meet requirements for regular 
admission. Students admitted on a conditional basis may be required to complete additional 
coursework and must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 on the first nine hours of graduate courses 500 
level or above or on all courses taken when meeting this nine (9) hour requirement in order to be 
granted regular admission. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements 

In addition to the degree requirements established by the Graduate School, students earning the 
Master of Science in Engineering Technology must satisfy the degree requirements listed below. 

1. Students must select a degree option (thesis, project, or coursework) and develop a degree plan to 
be approved by a faculty adviser and the School of Computing graduate coordinator prior to the 
completion of more than nine (9) hours of graduate work. 



College of Science and Technology ij 205 



(a) Thesis Option The thesis is intended to be a scholarly piece of research designed to expand 
the student's education in an area of engineering technology. This research must be conducted 
and defended before the student's graduate committee, and the final thesis report accepted by 
the Southern Miss graduate reader and the Southern Miss Graduate Studies Office. The thesis, 
when completed, receives six (6) graduate hours. The thesis option requires 30 hours total: six 
(6) hours of thesis, and 24 additional hours (18 hours must be at the 600 level or higher). 

(b) Project Option. The project is also intended to be a scholarly piece of research. The project 
must be conducted, written, and defended before the student's graduate committee. The project 
is worth three (3) graduate hours. The project option requires 33 hours total: three (3) hours 
of project and 30 additional hours (18 hours must be at the 600 level or higher). Students who 
select die project option should enroll in a project course for credit. 

(c) Coursework Option: The coursework option requires 36 hours total of which 1 8 hours must 
be 600 level or higher. 

During the first year of graduate study, students must select a graduate committee comprised of 
three members of whom two must be members of the graduate faculty of the School of Computing. 
Students must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination, which is required for 
graduation. This exam is normally administered during the final semester of graduate work. 
Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 based on all graduate courses completed. A 3.0 
GPA is required to graduate. 

Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 



School of Construction 

Desmond Fletcher, M.Arch., Director 
118 College Drive #5138 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4895 

Coates, Fletcher, Hannon, Kemp, Lipscomb, Marchman, Sulbaran, Vajpayee 

Mission 



The School of Construction graduate program at The University of Southern Mississippi is committed 
to preparing our students for exceptional careers in industry. To fulfill our mission, the School of 
Construction programs seek a balanced and synergistic agenda of instruction, scholarly activity and 
professional service and provide the opportunity to obtain a Master of Science in Engineering Technology 
with emphasis areas in: 

• Construction Management and Technology, 

• Architectural and Construction Visualization, or 

• Logistics Management and Technology. 

A Certificate in Construction Management is also available. 



Master of Science in Engineering Technology 

Requests for application forms and other information may be addressed to the manager of Graduate 
Admissions. Telephone inquiries may be made by calling (601) 266-4895. E-Mail inquiries may be made 
to Desmond.Fletcher@usm.edu. 

Graduate assistantships are available for the M.S. degree. Students with good undergraduate records are 
encouraged to apply at the time they request admission. 



206 | College of Science and Technology 



Still 



Admission Standards 

Admission to The University of Southern Mississippi's M.S. programs is selective. Regular admission is 
contingent on having graduated from a college or university accredited by a recognized accrediting agency. 
In addition, the graduate admissions committee of the School of Construction recommends admittance 
only for those applicants whose academic background, work experience, demonstrated leadership, and 
communication skills meets the challenging demands of graduate programs. 

In evaluating applications, the admission committee utilizes the following criteria: 

Undergraduate record 

The cumulative grade point average (GPA) from all institutions, the area(s) of concentration, the balance 
of verbal/communication and quantitative/analytical courses, and the trend of grades are considered. 
Applicants must have a minimum 2.75 GPA in their last 60 hours for regular admission. 

Graduate Admission Tests 

A candidate should strive to achieve good balanced scores in all areas of on either the Graduate 
Management Admissions Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE). For further information 
regarding taking this test contact Graduate Admissions office. 

Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 

Students whose native language is not English must achieve a TOEFL score of 550 or more. 

Work Experience 

While work experience is not required for admission, two or more years of relevant responsibility 
strengthens the likelihood of admission to the program. Applicants are encouraged to submit resumes 
showing job responsibilities and accomplishments. 

Letters of Recommendation 

The admission committee reviews three (3) letters of recommendation to gain a more personal 
understanding of the applicant's leadership ability in terms of communication and interpersonal skills. 
Each applicant should request three recommendation letters, at least one of which addresses the applicant's 
academic preparation. Letters of recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the department. 

Students may enroll in courses reserved exclusively for graduate students if they have regular admission 
to specific Southern Miss graduate programs and have taken the necessary prerequisites or if they have 
been admitted to the certificate program. In rare cases, students may be admitted conditionally. To remove 
Conditional Admission status, masters students must earn a 3.0 on the first nine (9) semester hours of 
course work numbered 500 or above on all courses taken while completing this nine (9) hour requirement. 

Students transferring from other graduate schools must meet the admission requirements stated above. At 
the time of admission, transfer students may request that up to six (6) semester hours of approval credit be 
applied toward degree requirements. Once enrolled, transfer of credit for courses taken at other institutions 
must be approved in advance. See Transfer Course Policy in this Bulletin. 



Academic Policies 

Students who receive a grade of "C" in more than nine (9) hours of course work will be dismissed from 
the program. Students may not apply hours toward a degree for courses in which there is a grade of "D;" 
students who receive grades of "D" in more than six (6) hours of course work will be dismissed from the 
program. Students who receive grades of "F" in more than three (3) hours of course work will be dismissed 
from the program. Students must have a 3.0 GPA to be in good standing. 

Upon approval by the graduate committee, students may repeat one and only one course to improve 
a cumulative grade point average. Students whose cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls below 
3.0 will be placed on probation. Students must attain a cumulative 3.0 GPA by the end of the following 
(probationary) semester or the graduate committee may dismiss them from the program subject to review. 



College of Science and Technology | 207 



Degree Requirements 

In addition to the degree requirements established by the Graduate School (minimum 30 hours with a 
minimum of 1 8 hours at the 600 level), students earning the Master of Science in Engineering Technology 
must satisfy the degree requirements listed below. 

1 . Students must select an emphasis area (Construction Management and Technology, Architectural and 
Construction Visualization, or Logistics Management and Technology) and develop a degree plan to be 
approved by a faculty advisor and the School of Construction graduate coordinator prior to completion of 
nine (9) hours of graduate work. Students must complete the course work including required foundation 
courses defined within the emphasis area. Depending on the emphasis area selected, the following options 
may be available: 

(a) Thesis Option: The thesis is intended to be a scholarly piece of research designed to expand the 
student's education in an area of engineering technology. This research must be conducted and defended 
before the student's graduate committee, and the final thesis report accepted by the USM Graduate Reader 
and the USM Graduate School. The thesis, when completed, receives six (6) graduate hours. The thesis 
option requires a minimum of 30 hours total: 6 hours of thesis, and 24 additional hours (18 hours must be 
at the 600 

level or higher). Additional hours may be required based on the student's academic record and experience, 

(b) Project Option: The project is also intended to be a scholarly piece of research. The project must be 
conducted, written, and defended before the student's graduate committee. The project is worth 3 graduate 
hours. The project option requires 33 hours total: 12 hours of project and 21 additional hours (18 hours 
must be at the 600 level or higher). Additional hours may be required based on the student's academic 
record and experience. 

(c) Coursework Option, the coursework option requires 36 hours total of which 1 8 hours must be 600 level 
or higher. 

2. During the first semester of graduate study, students must select a Graduate Committee comprised 
of three members of which at least two must be members of the graduate faculty of the School of 
Construction. 

3. Students must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination, which is required for graduation. 
This exam is normally administered during the final semester of graduate work. 

4. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 based on all graduate courses completed. 

5. Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Students must meet the requirements specified in the front section 
of the Graduate Bulletin. 



r v 



liia 



Certificate in Construction Management 

The Certificate in Construction Management is a professional curriculum for students who need to 
update and formalize their knowledge pertaining to construction management. The certificate program 
is open to students currently enrolled in a masters or doctoral degree program and to students who have 
a baccalaureate degree. Students not enrolled in a masters or doctoral program must apply as a non- 
degree seeking student — see requirements in the Graduate Bulletin. Students may complete the certificate 
program with or without being admitted to a specific degree program. Students must apply to certificate 
program before completing six (6) credit hours of the courses required for the Certificate. Students may 
complete the certificate curriculum by taking the courses in any combination of regular or on-line courses. 

To earn the Certificate, students are required to complete a minimum of 1 8 credit hours (all with grades of 
B or better) approved by the graduate committee. Upon review and approval by the graduate committee, 
credit earned during certificate achievement may be applied toward the M.S. degree. 



208 j| College of Science and Technology 



Department of Economic and Workforce 
Development 

Ken Malone, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5022 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-6067 

fax: (601) 266-6071 

Annulis, Gaudet, Hales, Malone, Miller 

The Department of Economic and Workforce Development offers graduate work leading to a 
Master of Science in Economic Development and a Master of Science in Workforce Training and 
Development. 

Master of Science in Economic Development 

The goal of the Economic Development program is to assist students in acquiring professional 
competency in the concepts, skills, working tools, and creative approaches essential to those 
involved in the field of economic development, whether at the community, state, regional, national, 
or international level. 

Admission Requirements: 

1. Have a 3.0 (4.0 scale) grade point average over the last two years of the student's undergraduate 
studies. 

2. Submit GRE scores. The Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) may be submitted in 
place of the GRE. Students whose native language is not English must achieve a TOEFL score of 
560 or more. 

3. Provide three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess die applicant's readiness 
for graduate study. The letters should be sent to the department. 

4. In exceptional cases, students may be admitted conditionally. Such students must earn a 3.0 on 
the first nine (9) semester hours of coursework numbered 500 or above or on all coursework taken 
while completing this nine (9) hour requirement in order to qualify for regular admission. 

5. Students may be required to take some prerequisite courses in geography or business. 

6. Submit statement of purpose and goals, portfolio and resume. 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduarestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements: 

1 . Successful completion of a minimum of thirty (30) hours in graduate- level courses (18 hours 600 
level or higher) as follows: 

a. Minimum of twenty (20) hours with the prefix ED. 

b. Demonstrated proficiency (through coursework and/or the comprehensive exam) in economic 
development research, finance, and marketing, equivalent to ED 722, 724, 761, 764, 765. 

c. At least four (4) hours of apprenticeship (ED 791 ). 

2. Successful completion of a comprehensive written or oral examination. 

3. Completion of one of two curriculum options as follows: 

a. Thesis option 

1) ED 698 (3 hours) 

2) Acceptance of valid thesis topic 

3) Formation of thesis committee prior to last semester of study 

b. Non-Thesis option 
1) ED 789 (3 hours) 

4. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



College of Science and Technology || 209 



Master of Science in Workforce Training and Development 

The Master of Science in Workforce Training and Development emphasizes both the research and 
theory framework as well as the practical application of workplace learning and performance. The 
goal of the Workforce Training and Development master's program is to prepare students to improve 
human performance, balance individual and organizational needs, build knowledge capital within 
the organization, and determine the return on investment of training programs. Students learn to 
think strategically to design and develop interventions that will positively impact workplace learning 
and performance. This program is designed to expand instructional opportunities beyond traditional 
boundaries of on-campus class delivery. The Workforce Training and Development Executive 
Format program utilizes a distance-learning platform to maximize interaction and learning not only 
during in-person, weekend-class sessions, but also between sessions via online communication 
among students and professors. 



Admission Requirements: 



1. An applicant must hold a baccalaureate degree from an institution approved by a recognized 
accrediting agency. 

2. An applicant must be eligible to re-enter in good standing the last college of university attended. 

3. An applicant must provide evidence, by official transcript, of a grade point average of at least 2.75 
(figured on "A" equals 4.0) for the last two years of undergraduate study, and a grade point average 
of at least 3.0 on undergraduate courses in the field of proposed graduate study 

4. An applicant must have at least 3 letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness fro graduate study and should be sent to the department. 

5. An applicant must submit test scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the 
Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). The GRE is the preferred test. However, the 
GMAT will be allowed under some circumstances. 

6. An applicant whose native language is not English mst achieve a TOEFL score of 575 or more. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements 

1 . In addition to the degree requirements established by the Graduate School (30 hours with 1 8 hours 
at the 600 level), students earning the Master of Science in Workforce Training and Development 
must satisfy the degree requirements listed below. 



m 



Students must complete a project and develop a degree plan to be approved by a faculty adviser 

and the Workforce Training and Development coordinator prior to the completion of more than 

nine (9) hours of graduate work. 

Students must satisfactorily complete 21 hours of core courses. These courses are determined after 

review of the student's application materials. 

During the first year of graduate study, students must select a graduate committee composed of 

three members of whom two must be members of the graduate faculty of the College of Science 

and Technology. 

Students must perform satisfactorily on a comprehensive examination that is required for 

graduation. This exam is normally administered during the final semester of graduate work. 

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.0 based on all graduate courses completed. 

Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 

this Bulletin. 



Doctor of Philosophy in Human Capital Development 

The Department of Economic and Workforce Development offers the doctor of philosophy 
in human capital development with a research focus in economic, technology or workforce 
development. The Ph.D. program emphasizes advanced study and research of human capital 
development in high-growth, high technology industries. The program is designed to build 
cohorts of scholars capable of advancing the theoretical as well as empirical base of human 
capital development to support the discovery of new knowledge and its transfer and delivery for 
all industries in general and for high growth, high technology industries in particular. The Ph.D. 
program prepares future leaders with the ability to integrate new technologies which demand a 
highly skilled workforce for increased economic globalization. The Ph.D. program in Human 
Capital Development is administered from the Gulf Coast campus and is offered in an Executive 



210 jj College of Science and Technology 



Format which effectively blends face-to-face instruction with alternative deliver}' to maximize 
learning and professional development. Interaction and learning among students and professors 
occur during in-person, week-end class sessions, intensive mini sessions, and through online 
learning communities. For additional program information or updates, please contact Cyndi Gaudet, 
program coordinator, at 228.214.3344 or Cyndi.Gaudet@usm.edu. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Admissions: 

The minimum standards for regular admission are: 

1. The applicant must hold a master's degree from an institution approved by a 
recognized accrediting agency. 

2. The applicant must be eligible to re-enter in good standing the last college or 
university attended. 

3. The applicant must present evidence, by official transcript, of a grade point average 
equivalent of at least 3.5 (calculated on a 4.0 scale) on previous graduate coursework 
to Southern Miss. 

4. Applicants must submit official transcripts from all college or universities attended. To 
be "official" the transcripts must be sent directly from the college/university to the 
Soudiern Miss Office of Graduate Admission found online at http://www.usm.edu/ 
graduatestudies/. 

5. Applicants must have current GRE scores (< 10 years old) submitted to Southern 
Miss. 

6. Applicant must submit proof of immunization for two MMR (Measles, Mumps, 
Rubella) vaccinations. Applicants must complete the immunization compliance form 
which can be found as a PDF at: http://www.usm.edu/healthservice/services/forms/ 
immunization-compliance.pdf. 

7. A graduate application fee in the form of a check or money order made payable The 
University of Southern Mississippi Graduate Admissions. 

8. Applicant must submit current resume or curriculum vitae (CV) to the department. 

9. Applicant must have at least three letters of recommendation from persons qualified 
to assess the applicant's readiness for doctoral work. Recommendation forms can be 
downloaded at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies/recommend_forms.php. 

10. A statement of professional and/or scholarly accomplishments and a letter of intent 
specifying areas of interest and career goals. This should be approximately five pages 
in length single spaced. The purpose of this essay is to allow the departmental 
admissions committee to assess the applicant's research topic development to date, 
the applicant's purpose for seeking to earn a PhD in this area, potential synergies in 
research topics or areas with existing faculty in the program, department, college and 
university, and the potential for success in the program. 

11. International students should submit TOEFL scores. For non-U.S. resident prospects, 
contact the Office of International Admissions at 118 College Drive #5151, 
Hattiesburg MS 39406, or by telephone at 60 1 .266.484 1 . 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum of fifty-four (54) graduate hours beyond the master's degree with a 3.0 is required to 
graduate. Students must meet the general requirements set forth by the Office of Graduate Studies of 
The University of Southern Mississippi. Additional requirements include the satisfactory completion 
of written and oral comprehensive examinations, and the satisfactory completion and oral defense 
of an original research dissertation. Coursework for the Human Capital Development PhD program 
includes the completion of a General Core (15 semester hours), Research core (12 semester hours in 
research design and methodology coursework, 12 hours of dissertation research), and 15 hours for 
the student's research concentration (technology, economic, or workforce development). 



Continuous Enrollment Requirement 

Students must meet the enrollment requirement specified in this Bulletin and the requirements of 
The Graduate Studies Office. 



College of Science and Technology f 211 



Department of Geography and Geology 

Clifton Dixon, Ph.D., Chair 
118 College Drive #5051 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4729 

Bass, Cochran, Dixon, Griffith, Meylan, Miller, Raber, Reese, Russell, Ufnar 

The Department of Geography and Geology offers a program of study and research leading to a 
Master of Science and a Doctor of Philosophy in Geography. The programs also offers a curriculum 
leading to the Master of Science in Geology and a Master of Science in Professional Geology. 

Geography Program 

The Department of Geography and Geology offers a program of study and research leading to 
a Master of Science and a Doctor of Philosophy in Geography. The curriculum is designed to 
provide a thorough understanding of geography as a profession, as well as a solid foundation for 
continued work towards a Doctor of Philosophy in Geography or a related field. The program 
provides students with a knowledge of the history, theory, content, and techniques of geography. 
Graduate students can design their course of study/research and concentrate in one of the subfields 
of geography that the faculty support. These areas include, but are not limited to, geospatial 
technologies (remote sensing, GIS, cartography), cultural-historical geography, coastal geography, 
environmental change, biogeography, landscape ecology, resource management, Latin America and 
the U.S. South. 

Admission Requirements - Geography 

The department encourages all interested candidates to apply. An undergraduate degree in geography 
is not a prerequisite. 

1. Applicants must have a 3.0 (4.0 scale) grade point average over the last sixty (60) hours of 
undergraduate study. 

2. Applicants must also submit a GRE score to the Graduate Studies Office. Students whose native 
language is not English must achieve a TOEFL score of 560 or higher. 

3. Students with a non-geography degree may be required to take courses to cover their deficiencies. 
In exceptional cases, students may be admitted conditionally. Such students must earn a 3.0 on the 
first nine (9) semester hours of coursework numbered 500 or above or on all coursework taken 
while completing this nine (9) hour requirement in order to qualify for regular admission. 

4. Applicants must also send three letters of recommendation to the Department of Geography, care 
of the graduate coordinator. 

5. Applicants must also send a personal statement as to why they want to enter the program This 
statement should be limited to 750 words and should also be sent to the Geography graduate 
coordinator in the Department of Geography and Geology. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Master of Science Program 



Degree Requirements - Geography 



1. 



A minimum of thirty-six (36) semester hours in graduate-level geography courses with at least 

eighteen (18) hours of work in courses at the 600-level (or higher). With the approval of the major 

professor, the student has an option of taking (outside the department) up to twelve (12) semester 

hours of cognate courses within the minimum hourly requirements. 

GHY 710 and 780. These courses are required of all students. 

Demonstrated proficiency in cartography and statistical/quantitative methods. Proficiency is 

generally established (on an individual basis) by evidence of satisfactory completion of coursework 

in these areas sometime in a student's academic career, at either the graduate or undergraduate 

level. 

A thesis or a paper of professional quality. The thesis will confer six (6) semester hours credit to 

be counted as part of the total minimum hourly requirement for the degree. The paper, which will 

normally be the end product of work begun in a seminar, will confer no credit hours toward the 

minimum required for the degree. 



212 J College of Science and Technology 



5. Successful completion of an oral and written comprehensive examination on the student's 
academic program. Students writing a thesis will take an oral defense of the thesis. Students 
choosing the option of preparing a paper of professional quality will have the paper reviewed by 
the department faculty and will present it orally before the combined faculty. 

6. A 3.0 GPA required for graduation 

7. Students must meet the requirement for continuous enrollment specified in the front section of this 
Bulletin. 



SM 



Doctor of Philosophy in Geography 

Admission Requirements - Geography 

The department encourages all interested candidates to apply. An undergraduate degree in geography 
is not a prerequisite. 

1. Applicants must have a 3.0 (4.0 scale) grade point average over the last sixty (60) hours of 
undergraduate study. 

2. Applicants must also submit a GRE score to the Office of Graduate Admissions. Students whose 
native language is not English must achieve a TOEFL score of 560 or higher. 

3. Students with a non-geography degree may be required to take courses to cover their deficiencies. 
In exceptional cases, students may be admitted conditionally. Such students must earn a 3.0 on the 
first nine (9) semester hours of coursework numbered 500 or above or on all coursework taken 
while completing this nine (9) hour requirement in order to qualify for regular admission. 

4. Applicants must also send three letters of recommendation to the Department of Geography, care 
of the graduate coordinator. 

5. Applicants must also send a personal statement as to why they want to enter the program. This 
statement should be limited to 750 words and should also be sent to the Geography graduate 
coordinator in the Department of Geography and Geology. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements 

A minimum of eighty-four (84) graduate hours beyond the bachelor's degree or a minimum of fifty-four 
(54) graduate hours beyond the master's degree with a 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. Students must 
meet the general requirements set forth by The Graduate Studies Office of The University of Southern 
Mississippi. The following are major additional requirements: 

1 . Arrange for a graduate adviser by the end of the second semester. 

2. GHY 7 1 and 780. These courses are required of all students. 

3. GHY 715 and 755 or their equivalent will be required of all doctoral students. 

4. Gain approval of a written prospectus from a five-member doctoral committee by the end of the 
third semester. 

5. Provide an annual research progress report to the doctoral committee after completion of the 
prospectus. 

6. Pass a comprehensive examination (oral and written) by the end of the fifth semester. 

7. Fulfill the Research Tools requirement as specified by the student's doctoral committee and 
approved by the chair of the department. 

8. Gain approval of a dissertation and successfully defend the dissertation at an advertised research 
seminar open to the public. 

9. Continuous enrollment must be maintained as stated in this Bulletin. 

10. Residency. Students must meet residency requirements as stated in diis Buletin. 

1 1 . Research Tool(s) are required and are determined by the student's doctoral committee. 



Geology Program 



The Geology program offers a curriculum leading to the Master of Science in Geology and a Master of 
Science in Geology: Professional Geology emphasis. The Geology program at The University of Southern 
Mississippi emphasizes both the importance of a field-based education and the application of new 
technologies to geologic investigations. Geology collaborates with die Center for Science and Mathematics 
Education in programs leading to the M.S., and Ph.D. with an emphasis in earth and environmental 
education. 



College of Science and Technology jj 213 



Master of Science Program 

Admission Requirements - Geology 

Admission is based on grade point average (GPA), three letters of recommendation from persons 
qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study (letters should be sent to the 
department), and submission of results on the Graduate Record Examination (GRJE). Both the 
overall GPA and a GPA calculated for courses (excluding special problems courses) in geology and 
other sciences, mathematics, computer science, and statistics will be considered. 

Applicants who do not have degrees in geology will be considered for admission but will be required 
to remedy any deficiencies, including geology field camp, compared to the courses required for the 
B.S. in geology at The University of Southern Mississippi. Students who are not admitted as regular 
graduate students may be considered for conditional admission (minimum GPA requirements are in 
the front section of this Bulletin). 

Admission to the Professional Geology emphasis requires three years experience as a geologist or in 
a closely related position. A letter of support from the applicant's immediate supervisor is required. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements 
Geology Emphasis 

A minimum of thirty (30) graduate hours (18 hours at this level), including six (6) hours' thesis 
credit (698), with a 3.0 GPA, is required to graduate. The remaining twenty-four (24) hours must be 
graduate geology courses, excluding GLY 692 (Special Problems in Geology) or similar arranged 
courses, and must include at least 12 hours at the 600 level, excluding thesis credit. 

During the first semester of full-time study, the student should identify a general area of thesis 
research and establish a thesis director and graduate committee. A thesis prospectus should be 
approved by the graduate committee no later than the end of the second semester. The student must 
complete an original research project and submit and defend a thesis to receive the M.S. degree in 
geology. Students must also pass a comprehensive exam. Students who have not already passed the 
Association of State Boards of Geology (ASBOG) exam are required to take it before completion of 
the degree program. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Degree Requirements: Professional Geology Emphasis 

A minimum of thirty (30) graduate hours, with a minimum 3.0 GPA, is required for graduation. The 
required thirty hours must include 18 hours at the 600 level or higher. The required courses must be 
geology courses or closely related courses within the School of Ocean and Earth Sciences approved 
by the department chair. Independent study courses offered as GLY 692 (with a course title) can be 
used. 

Degree candidates will be required to pass both a written and an oral comprehensive exam. The 
Association of State Boards of Geology (ASBOG) Fundamentals of Geology exam must be passed 
before taking the comprehensive exam. A portfolio consisting of documents demonstrating the 
ability to conduct applied geological research and technical writing will be required and can include 
documents created as part of their employment responsibilities. 

The Department of Geology is committed to offering at least two courses each semester during 
the regular academic year that can be taken by individuals who are employed full time. This will 
include night courses in Hattiesburg, distance learning courses, fully or partially online courses, and 
compressed weekend courses. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



214 J College of Science and Technology 



Department of Marine Science 

Steven E. Lohrenz, Ph.D., Chair 
Department of Marine Science 
John C. Stennis Space Center 
Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 
(228)688-3177 
steven.lohrenz@usra.edu 

Asper, Brunner, Caruthers, Guo, Howden, Kamenkovich, Lohrenz, Nechaev, Orcutt, Redalje, Shiller, Yeager 

The Department of Marine Science offers both the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
Marine Science and a Master of Science in Hydrographic Science. Graduate level education and 
research programs are offered in four emphasis areas of marine science (biological, geological, 
chemical, and physical marine science and in hydrographic science). These areas include numerical 
ocean modeling, remote sensing, bathymetry and mapping, positioning, acoustics, and hydrographic 
surveying. The marine science faculty are drawn from its location at the Stennis Space Center (near 
Bay St. Louis), and from other departments in the College of Science and Technology (Hattiesburg). 
Scientists affiliated with the Naval Research Laboratory, the Naval Oceanographic Office, the 
National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration and other agencies at the Stennis Space Center and elsewhere provide additional 
state-of-the-art research and educational opportunities in marine science and hydrographic science. 

The best preparation for students interested in pursuing a graduate degree in marine science 
or hydrographic science would be to develop a strong working knowledge in calculus, applied 
mathematics, statistics, the basic sciences (biology, chemistry, geology, physics) and engineering. 

Experience with computers is highly recommended. We realize that not all students will have 
gained the ideal background for pursuing a M.S. in marine science or hydrographic science or Ph.D. 
in marine science. Deficiencies will normally be made up during the student's first year. 

Master of Science Programs 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general admission and academic requirements for all graduate programs as 
set forth in this Bulletin, regular admission to the master's program in marine science or in 
hydrographic science requires successful completion of the Graduate Record Examination and a 
high grade point average for the last two years of undergraduate study. Successful applicants have 
highly competitive scores and have grade point averages of 3.0 or above. Also required are three 
letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate 
study, which should be sent to the department. A letter of intent should also be sent to the department 
chair expressing personal academic, research, and career goals. This letter is used in two ways in the 
admission process. It provides a sample of the applicant's writing competency and communication 
skills, and provides information concerning the compatibility of the applicant's interests with 
departmental research interests. A minimum score of 560 is required on the Test of English as 
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for applicants whose native language is not English. Applicants 
who are not eligible for regular admission may be considered for conditional admission. Students 
admitted conditionally must maintain a 3.0 GPA for the first nine (9) hours of coursework numbered 
500 and above or on all coursework taken while completing this nine (9) hour requirement. If this 
requirement is not met, the student is not allowed to remain in the program. Upon recommendation 
by the department chair and approval by the dean, the student admitted conditionally may have his 
or her admission status changed to "regular admission." For students wishing to be considered for 
graduate assistantships for the academic year beginning in the fall semester, application materials 
should be received no later than March 1. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
wwvv.usni.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Studv" 
link. 



College of Science and Technology || 215 

Degree Requirements for Master of Science in Marine Science 

A total of 34 hours of graduate level courses (18 hours of 600 level or higher) with a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 must be completed in order to fulfill the master of science degree requirements. All 
entering graduate students must complete the four core courses, generally by the end of their first 
year in residence. Students advance to candidacy for the M.S. degree by completing all the core 
courses with a grade of B or better, successfully passing the department qualifying examination 
(administered after the core courses are completed), and completing a thesis prospectus. A graduate 
student can accumulate no more than two Cs. Other program course requirements include six (6) 
hours of Thesis (698) and at least two (2) hours of Seminar in Marine Science. The required courses 
account for 24 of the total 34 hours; the remaining 10 hours (courses numbered 600 and above) 
must be chosen by the student (after consultation with the student's adviser) from a list of elective 
courses approved by the department. In addition to the degree program requirements described in 
this Bulletin, all students in the master of science degree program must accumulate at least ten (10) 
days of appropriate field experience in order to successfully complete the degree program. Contact 
the department chair for information on appropriate types of field experience. More information on 
marine science degree requirements and additional course listings can be obtained by writing to the 
department chair. A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

Required Courses 

Hours 

MAR 501 Biological Oceanography 3 

MAR 501L Biological Oceanography Laboratory 1 

MAR 541 Marine Chemistry 3 

MAR541L Marine Chemistry Laboratory 1 

MAR 561 Physical Oceanography 3 

MAR 561L Physical Oceanography Laboratory 1 

MAR 581 Geological Oceanography 3 

MAR 581L Geological Oceanography Laboratory 1 

MAR 689 Seminar in Marine Science 2 

MAR 698 Thesis 6 

Approved Electives (600 level or above) 10 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements for Master of Science in Hydrographic Science 

The M.S. degree in Hydrographic Science is a nonthesis degree program. A total of 36 semester 
hours of graduate level courses (18 hours of 600 level or higher) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 must 
be completed to fulfill the Master of Science in Hydrographic Science degree requirements. Students 
must also take a comprehensive examination. A graduate student can accumulate no more than two Cs. 
A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 



Students admitted to the M.S. in hydrographic science degree program are required to complete 
a set of core courses. There are a total of 27 semester hours of required core coursework. Each 
degree-seeking student must take at least one three-hour elective course. All students admitted to the 
M.S. degree program in Hydrographic Science must choose from one of two options at the time they 
are admitted to the program. Successful completion of either Option I or Option II, in addition to 
passing all the required and elective courses, will constitute the completion of degree requirements. 
Option I is designed for those students Who wish to complete a more practical field-oriented degree 
program. Option II is designed for students who wish to complete a more theoretical and classroom- 
oriented program and involves completion of a Capstone Review project, usually consisting of, but 
not limited to, an extended literature review of an appropriate hydrographic science topic. 



216 I College of Science and Technology 



Required Courses (Options I and II) 

Hours 

HYD600 Classical Geodesy 4 

HYD601 Hydrographic Data Management 3 

HYD602 Marine Geology for Hydrographers 1 

HYD603 Law and Policy for Hydrographic Science 1 

HYD604 Kinematic Positioning 3 

HYD 605 Applied Bathymetry 3 

HYD 606 Nautical Cartography and GIS 3 

HYD612 Water Level 2 

HYD 620 Math Concepts for Hydrographers 1 

MAR 561 Physical Oceanography 3 

MAR 668 Applied Ocean Acoustics 3 

Approved Elective 3 

Option I Required Courses 

Hours 

HYD 608 Practical Hydrographic Science 2 

HYD 609 Nautical Science 1 

HYD 610 Hydrographic Science Field Project 3 

Option II Required Courses 

Hours 

HYD 696 Capstone Review 3 

HYD 601 Approved Elective 3 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Doctor of Philosophy in Marine Science 

The Department of Marine Science offers a Doctor of Philosophy in Marine Science with 
specialization in a wide range of marine science fields, including biological, geological and physical 
oceanography, marine chemistry, and hydrographic science. The Ph.D. program emphasizes 
excellence in research. Qualified students holding either a bachelor's or master's degree in a 
relevant field of science, mathematics, or computer science are encouraged to apply for admission 
to the Ph.D. program. 

Students must meet the general requirements set forth in the Graduate Bulletin of The University of 
Southern Mississippi. The Ph.D. in marine science requires eighty-four (84) graduate hours beyond 
the bachelor's degree or fifty-four (54) graduate hours beyond the master's degree. 



Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general admission and academic requirements for all graduate programs as 
set forth in this Bulletin, regular admission to the Ph.D. program in marine science requires 
successful completion of the Graduate Record Examination and a high grade point average for 
the last two years of undergraduate study as well as a 3.50 GPA on previous graduate study. 
Successful applicants have highly competitive scores and have a grade point average of 3.0 or 
above for undergraduate work and 3.5 on previous graduate study. Also required are three letters of 
recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study which 
should be sent to the department chair. A letter of intent should also be sent to the department chair 
expressing personal academic and research goals. A minimum score of 560 is required on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for applicants whose native language is not English. For 
students wishing to be considered for graduate assistantships for the academic year beginning in the 
fall semester, application materials should be received by the department no later than March 1. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Science and Technology j 217 



Program Requirements 

Required Courses 

Hours 

MAR 501 Biological Oceanography 3 

MAR 501 L Biological Oceanography Laboratory 1 

MAR 541 Marine Chemistry 3 

MAR 541L Marine Chemistry Laboratory 1 

MAR 561 Physical Oceanography 3 

MAR 561L Physical Oceanography Laboratory 1 

MAR 581 Geological Oceanography 3 

MAR 581L Geological Oceanography Laboratory 1 

MAR 689 Seminar in Marine Science 2 

MAR 898 Dissertation 12 

Approved Electives 12* 

*MAR 691, MAR 791 - Directed Research in Marine Science, MAR 697, MAR 797- Independent 
Study and Research, MAR 698 - Thesis and MAR 898 - Dissertation, do not count toward this 
twelve (12) credit hour approved elective requirement for the Ph.D. The above courses account for 
forty-two (42) of the total fifty-four (54) hours (students entering with a master's degree) or eighty- 
four (84) hours (students entering with a bachelor's degree) required for the Ph.D. Course listings 
for the additional 12-42 required hours can be obtained by writing to the department chair. 

Other Requirements s fi 

1 . The student is required to pass an oral or written qualifying examination or both. 

2. Research tool(s) requirement for marine science doctoral students is tailored to the specific tools and 
skills needed by the student for his/her dissertation research or future career. Contact the department for 
specific requirements. 

3. Selection and approval of a suitable research problem. 
4 The student is required to pass an oral or written comprehensive examination to determine the 

student's comprehension of course material and the student's ability to pursue the proposed research 

5. Completion and successful defense of a scholarly dissertation based on the student's original research 
(12 hours of 898 are required) 

6. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. 

7. Residency. Students must meet the residency requirements specified in the Bulletin. 

8. In addition to the degree program requirements described in this Bulletin, all students in the Ph.D. 
degree program must accumulate at least ten (10) days of appropriate field experience in order 
to successfully complete the degree program. Contact the department chair for information on 
appropriate types of field experience. 

9. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 



Department of Mathematics 



C.S. Chen, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5045 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4289 

Adan-Bante, Chen, Contreras, Cwikla, Ding, Harris, Henry, Hornor, Kolibal, Lee, Perry, Piazza, Ross, Tian 

The Department of Mathematics offers the master of science in mathematics and the doctor of 
philosophy in computational science with an emphasis in mathematics. Individuals interested 
in obtaining graduate degrees in mathematics education should contact the Center for Science 
and Mathematics Education. The Center offers the master of science in science and mathematics 
education with an emphasis in mathematics, and the doctor of philosophy in science education with 
an emphasis in mathematics. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants wishing to enter either the master of science in mathematics degree program or the 
doctor of philosophy in computational science with an emphasis in mathematics degree program 
must satisfy the requirements of The Graduate Studies Office. Among those factors considered 
in the admission decision are the GPA, submission of test scores on the GRE, and three letters of 
recommendation from persons qualified to assess the candidate's readiness for graduate study. 
Letters should be sent to the department. Students whose native language is not English must 
achieve a score of 580 or above on the TOEFL exam. 



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218 



College of Science and Technology 



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Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Master of Science in Mathematics 

Program Requirements 

Upon completing one semester of graduate work, the student should select a three-person 
advisory committee from the graduate faculty. The student, with the help of his or her academic 
adviser, should prepare an Application for Approval of Graduate Program form. The advisor will 
distribute copies to the graduate faculty, the student's advisory committee, the department chair, 
the departmental file, and the student. The department chair and all three committee members must 
approve subsequent changes in the program. 

The student must enroll in the two-semester advanced calculus sequence at the graduate level at 
the beginning of the graduate program if the equivalent of this sequence was not included in the 
student's undergraduate preparation. None of these courses can satisfy any part of the minimum 
hour requirements for the master's degree, and a grade of B or above must be earned in each of the 
two courses. 

The following minimal requirements must be included in the program. 

1 . 30 hours of graduate coursework beyond the equivalent of a Southern Miss undergraduate degree 
in mathematics; 

2. 21 hours of courses numbered above 600; 

3. 1 8 hours of mathematics courses numbered above 600; 

4. 3.0 GPA for graduation; and 

5. a comprehensive examination. 

NOTE: Subject to approval of the department chair and the student's advisory committee, an outside 
minor consisting of nine (9) semester hours may be used as a portion of the 30-hour program. 

Courses offered by the department are grouped into nine areas. The student with the help of his or 
her academic adviser should select a suitable balance in at least three of the nine areas. 



Nine Specialty Areas 



1 . Topology/Geometry: 572, 575, 601 , 683 

2. Complex Analysis: 536, 636, 682 

3. Algebra: 521, 523, 524, 603, 681 

4. Linear Algebra: 526, 6 1 0, 68 1 

5. Analysis and Probability: 520, 641 , 642, 682, 684 

6. Conbinatorics and Graph Theory: 537, 539, 629 

7. Computational Mathematics: 560, 561, 610, 684, 685 

8. Differential and Partial Differential Equations. 5 1 5, 5 1 7, 605, 606, 684, 685 

9. Optimization: 5 1 8, 5 1 9, 684, 685 

The focus of the master's program is computational mathematics. This is reflected in its course 
scheduling. The courses 560, 561, (area 7); 526, 610, (area 4); and 605, 606 (area 8) are scheduled 
biannually Thus, these courses can form the core (three areas) for most, if not all, students. 
However, areas other than these three are offered in response to the interests and research of the 
graduate faculty. 

Each candidate for the master's degree will be expected to demonstrate subject matter mastery on 
the master's comprehensive examination. For the non-thesis student, the master's comprehensive 
examination is a written examination, it must be successfully completed two weeks prior to 
graduation, and it will cover the content of two courses (selected by the advisory committe in 
consultation with the student) from each of the student's three areas of specialization. For the thesis 
student, the master's comprehensive examination is an oral examination that will be primarily a 
defense of the thesis. 

The student who desires to write a thesis must selct a graduate faculty member who agrees to serve 
as thesis director. Prior to beginning the thesis, a student must submit (for approval to his or her 
advisory committee) a prospectus, the guidelines for which are available in the departmental office. 



College of Science and Technology | 219 



Summary of Important Events for the Thesis Option 

1 . Arrange for a graduate advisor during the second semester; 

2. Gain approval of a written thesis prospectus from the master's advisory committee by the end of 
the second semester, 

3. Pass a comprehensive examination and successfully defend the thesis by the end of the fourth 
semester; and 

4. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Program Requirements 

Students must complete the nine-hour core: MAT 771 (Functional Analysis for Computational 
Science), MAT 772 (Numerical Analysis for Computational Science), and MAT 773 (Signal 
Analysis for Computational Science). They must also complete the techniques courses (COS 701, 
702, 703), and include four hours of Seminar (COS 740). 

Students must meet the general requirements set forth by The Graduate Studies Office: 54 hours 
beyond a masters and 84 hours beyond a bachelor's degree. A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. For 
students entering the program with only a bachelor's degree, successful completion of the master of 
science in mathematics is required. The following are additional requirements: 

1 . Pass the comprehensive examination by the end of the sixth semester covering the core courses; 

2. Gain approval of a written prospectus from the doctoral advisory committee by the end of the 
fourth semester and pass qualifying examination on research prospectus; 

3. Research Tool(s): Research tool(s) are required and will be determined by the student's doctoral 
committee; 

4. Successfully defend the dissertation by the end of the sixth year; 

5. Fulfill the research tool requirement as specified by the doctoral advisory committee and approved 
by the department chair. 

6. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

7. Residency: Students must meet residency requirements set forth in the front of this Bulletin. 

Department of Physics and Astronomy 

Khin Maung Maung, Ph.D., Chair 

118 College Drive #5046 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4934 

Biswas, Gandy, Gearba, Lee, Mead, Pandey, Simla, Vera, Wliitehead, Winstead 

The Department of Physics and Astronomy offers or participates in programs leading to the Master 
of Science in Physics and the Doctor of Philosophy in Computational Science with an emphasis in 
Physics. At the master's level, the department offers a traditional master's program in physics as well 
as emphasis areas in computational science and polymer science. At the doctoral level, the department 
participates in the Computational Science Ph.D. program. 

Admission Requirements 

All applicants must satisfy the admission requirements of The Graduate Studies Office as outlined 
in the Graduate Bulletin. Admission to graduate programs in physics is based upon several factors 
including a student's previous academic performance, recommendation letters (minimum of three), 
and scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Letters of recommendation should be from 
persons qualified to assess the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the 
physics department. A minimum TOEFL score of 540 on the paper-based examination or 207 on 
the computer-based examination is required of those applicants for whom English is not their native 
language. It is recommended, but not required, that students applying for a stipend take the Advanced 
Physics GRE. 



220 | College of Science and Technology 



Prospective master's degree students should have completed mathematics through differential 
equations, and satisfactorily completed courses in introductory physics, mechanics, electricity 
and magnetism, modern physics, and quantum mechanics at the undergraduate level. Applicants 
possessing a bachelor's degree in physics may apply for regular admission to the Ph.D. program but 
will earn a master's degree in physics as part of a successful progress through the Ph.D. program. 
Such applicants possessing only a bachelor's degree will be formally admitted into the master's 
degree program and will officially enter the Ph.D. program after earning a master's degree. 

Applicants who hold a degree in physics but are inadequately prepared or those possessing a degree 
in a field other than physics may be granted conditional admission but will be required to complete 
makeup courses with a grade of B or better. The Graduate Studies Office specifies additional 
requirements for conditional admission. The department chair may impose additional requirements as 
well. Students admitted conditionally should communicate with the chair to outline the requirements 
for removing conditional status. Conditionally admitted students must earn a 3.0 GPA on the first 9 
hours or all hours taken the semester the 9 hours are completed. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Master of Science Program in Physics 

Program Requirements 

1 . completion of a minimum of thirty (30) hours of graduate work with a 3.0 GPA ( 1 8 hours must be 
at the 600 level or higher). A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

2. completion of the physics core courses: 

PHY 601, 602, 603, 650 12 hours 

3. PHY 689 (1, II, HI, IV): Physics Seminar 4 hours 

4. satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination 

5. development and completion of an original research project, thesis, and oral defense: 

PHY 698: Thesis 6 hours 

6. Electives 8 hours 

7. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Master of Science in Physics with an Emphasis in Polymer 
Physics 

Program Requirements 

Students choosing this optional program to the M.S. in physics must have successfully completed 
at least one full year of general chemistry with laboratory and it is strongly recommended that one 
semester of organic chemistry be taken for credit. Attendance at relevant seminars in the School of 
Polymers and High Performance Materials is required. 

1 . completion of a minimum of thirty (30) hours of graduate work with a 3.0 GPA ( 1 8 hours must be 
at the 600 level or higher). A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

2. completion of the physics core for the polymer option: 

PHY 601, 602, 603, 650, 689 (I, II, III) 15 hours 

3. polymer science coursework (at least 9 hours from the following): 

PSC710, 711,712, 730, 811,812 9+hours 

4. satisfactory completion of a comprehensive examination 

5. development and completion of an original research project, thesis, and oral defense 

PHY 698: Thesis (in the area of polymer physics) , 6 hours 

6. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 



College of Science and Technology f 221 

Master of Science in Physics with an Emphasis in Computational 
Science 

Program Requirements 

Proficiency in C, C++, or Fortran programming is required for students participating in this 
emphasis area. Students lacking this background should complete a programming course early in 
their graduate program. 

1 . completion of at least thirty-one (31) semester hours with a 3.0 GPA (18 hours must be at the 600 
level or higher). A 3.0 GPA is required to graduate. 

2. completion of physics core courses: PHY 601, 602, 602, 650 12 hours 

3. PHY 689 (I, II, HI, IV): Physics Seminar 4 hours 

4. satisfactory completion of a master's level comprehensive examination covering physics core areas 
(at the level of PHY 601, 602, 603, 650). 

5. satisfactory completion of computational techniques courses: COS 701, 702, and 703 9 hours 

6. completion of an original computational research project, thesis, and oral defense 

PHY 698: Thesis 6 hours 

7. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
wvvw.usm.edu/graduatestudies -click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



Doctor of Philosophy Program in Computational Science with an 
Emphasis in Physics 

Program Requirements 

All doctoral degrees require a minimum of eighty-four semester hours of coursework beyond the 
bachelor's degree or fifty-four semester hours of coursework beyond the master's degree. A 3.0 GPA 
is required for graduation. Additional program requirements include those listed below. 

1. for students entering the program with only a bachelor's degree, successful completion of the 
master of science degree in physics is required. 

2. satisfactory completion of required computational techniques courses: COS 701 , 702, 

and 703 9 hours 

3. satisfactory completion of computational physics core courses: PHY 710 and 711 6 hours 

4 satisfactory completion of a Ph.D. comprehensive examination covering computational physics (at 

the level of PHY 710 and 711). A maximum of two attempts to pass the Ph.D. comprehensive is 
allowed. 

5. completion of computationally intensive original research of sufficient quality to allow the 
preparation and successful defense of a Ph.D. dissertation. (12 hours of 898 are required) 

6. continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 

7. Residency: Students must meet residency requirements as specified in this Bulletin. 

8. Research Tool(s) are required and are determined by the student's doctoral committee. 






School of Polymers and High Performance 
Materials 



MarekW. Urban, Ph.D., Director 
118 College Drive #10076 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4868 

Hester, Hoyle, Lochhead, Mathias, Mauritz, McCormick, Moore, Morgan, Nazarenko, Otaigbe, Rawlins, 
Storey, S. Thames, Urban, Wicks, Wiggins 

The School of Polymers and High Performance Materials offers programs at the master's and 
doctoral levels. Curricula are designed to provide both a fundamental understanding of polymer 
chemistry and engineering and advanced courses dealing with special topics and state-of-the-art 
subjects. Both the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees require extensive research in areas involving basic 
investigations and developments applied to current and future problems of our society and world. 



222 ij College of Science and Technology 



Master of Science Program 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the master's program is based upon previous academic performance and scores on 
the general section of the Graduate Record Examination. Requirements include the following: a 
minimum grade point average of 2.75 or better on the last 60 hours of undergraduate work, a 3.0 
GPA in major, three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness for graduate study (letters should be sent to the school), and submission of scores on the 
GRE. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestiidies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 






Program Requirements 

Specific details of the admission and program requirements are outlined in a separate handbook 
provided by the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. 

Graduation is based upon 

1 . completion of 54 hours of graduate work including the 2 1 hours of PSC core courses with a GPA of 

3.0 or better (18 hours must be at the 600 level or higher); 

2. satisfactory development of an original research project and a thesis (6 hours of 698 required); 

3. satisfactory completion of the final comprehensive examination 

4. continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of 
this Bulletin. 



Required Coursework 

' PSC 701, 702, 710, 711, 720, 721, 730, and 703 or 712 21 hours 

PSC 691, 698: Research in Polymer Science and Thesis 10-45 hours 

PSC 789: Polymer Science Seminar 1-4 hours 



Doctor of Philosophy Program 

Admission Requirements 

The school admits students only to the master's program because of the diversity of entering 
students' backgrounds. Demonstrated excellence is required in coursework and examinations before 
a student is allowed to enter the doctoral program. Admission of students with previous graduate 
coursework or master's degrees from other institutions will be considered on an individual basis. 

Regular admission to advanced standing requires (1) obtaining a minimum GPA of 3.0 on the 26 
hours of core courses; (2) obtaining a minimum GPA of 3.5 in at least 30 hours of graduate courses 
taken at Southern Miss including the core courses and research; and (3) passing all three sections of 
the written comprehensive examination. 

Additional requirements for the Ph.D. degree dealing with residency, the research tools, the 
committee, the dissertation, the dissertation defense, application for candidacy, and graduation are 
described elsewhere in this Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edii/graduatestudies -click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" link. 



Program Requirements 

Specific details of the admission and program requirements are outlined in a separate handbook 
provided by the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials. 

Minimum course requirements for the doctorate are eighty-four (84) semester hours of coursework 
beyond the bachelor's degree. Fifty-four (54) semester hours are required beyond a master's degree 
in polymer science or a related area. Doctoral students must take all core courses (PSC 701, 702, 
703, 710, 711, 712, 720, 721, 730, 740) as well as two 800-level courses that are offered. Graduate 
students must register for one hour of polymer science seminar (PSC 789) each semester that 
they are in residence. A 3.0 GPA is required for graduation. Students must take 12 hours of 898 
(dissertation) and 3 hours the semester they defend the dissertation. 



College of Science and Technology J 223 



Research Tool(s) 

See department chair for specific requirements. (Handbook) 

Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The written comprehensive examination serves as the qualifying examination for the Ph.D. program, 
and is given twice a year at the end of the fall and spring terms. This three-part examination covers 
the areas of organic, physical, and practical polymer science. 

A student who fails any part of the examination must retake and pass that part at the end of the fall 
term. Only one additional attempt is allowed. 

Dissertation Prospectus 

Within nine (9) months of completing the written comprehensive examination, a written dissertation 
prospectus that includes an annotated bibliography must be approved by the student's committee. 
The prospectus summarizes the student's work accomplished to date and gives an outline of research 
objectives for the dissertation project. 



Proposition Presentation and Oral Defense 

Within 18 months of completing the comprehensive examination, the student must submit an 
independently conceived and developed written proposal dealing with an original proposition 
unrelated to his or her dissertation research. This proposal is then presented orally and defended 
before the faculty. Oral evaluation of the student's general knowledge of polymer science is carried 
out concomitant with his or her defense of the proposal. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



■". '■:'■':■■:■ .:.■■■ . v .. 



Sports and High Performance Materials Degrees 



Marek YV. Urban, Ph.D., Director 
School of Polymers and High 
Performance Materials 
118 College Drive #10076 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-4868 



Lou Marciani, Ph.D., Director 
School of Human Performance 
and Recreation 
118 College Drive #5142 
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 
(601) 266-5386 



PSC faculty: Hester, Hoyle, Lochhead, Mathius, Mauritz, McCormick, Moore, Morgan, Nazarenko, Otaigbe, 
Rawlins, Storey, Thames, Urban, Wicks 

HPR faculty: Gould, Krebs, Marciani, Phillips, Piland, Webster, Mggins 

The Sports and High Performance Materials research degree is collaboration between two of the 
universities premier research schools, the School of Polymers and High Performance Materials 
and the School of Human Performance and Recreation. The educational objectives of the program 
are to create multidisciplinary scientists who have the specific advanced research skills in polymer 
science, exercise physiology and biomechanics, and who are capable of developing new materials 
that significantly improve athletic and human performance. 

Master of Science Program 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the master's program is based upon previous academic performance and scores on 
the general section of the Graduate Record Examination. Requirements include the following: a 
minimum grade point average of 2.75 or better on the last 60 hours of undergraduate work, a 3.0 
GPA in major, three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's 
readiness for graduate study (letters should be sent to the school), and submission of scores on the 
GRE. 



224 I College of Science and Technology 



Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 

Degree Requirements 

Specific details of the admission and program requirements are outlined in a separate handbook 
provided by the Sports and High Performance Materials Program. 

Graduation is based upon 

1. completion of 33 hours of graduate work including the 27 hours of PSC and HPR core courses 
with a GPA of 3 . or better; 

2. satisfactory development of an original research project and a thesis (6 hours of 698 required); 

3. satisfactory completion of the final comprehensive examination 

4. Arrange for graduate advisor by the end of the first semester. 

5. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of this 
Bulletin. 

Required Coursework 

PSC 701, 702, 710, 712, 820,820L 17 hours 

HPR 701, 701L, 704, and 834 11 hours 

PSC/HPR 691, 698: Research and Thesis 10-45 hours 



Doctor of Philosophy Program 

Admission Requirements 

Demonstrated excellence in coursework, passing the cumulative examinations and passing of an 
oral examination that follows a written independent research proposal is necessary for a student 
to formally enter the doctoral program. Admission of students with previous graduate coursework 
or master's degrees from other institutions will be considered on an individual basis. A 3.5 GPA in 
masters course work is require for regular admission. 

Admission to candidacy requires: 

1 . No more than 2 grades lower than a B in the first 27 hours of core courses; 

2. A minimum GPA of 3.5 in at least 30 hours of graduate courses taken at USM, including the core 
courses and research; 

3. Passing nine (9) of eighteen (18) cumulative examinations; comprehensive exam. 

4. Passing an Oral Examination that follows the completion of a written Independent Research 
Proposal; and 

5. Arrange for graduate advisor by the end of the first semester. 

6. Continuous enrollment - Students must meet the requirement specified in the front section of this 
Bulletin. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Science and Technology jj 225 



Degree Requirements 

Minimum course requirements for the doctorate are fifty-one (51) hours beyond the master's degree. 
Required Coursework 

PSC 701, 702, 710, 712, 820,820L 17 hours 

HPR701,701L,704,and834 11 hours 

Approved 800 level electives 9 hours 

PSC/HPR 791, 898: Research and Dissertation (12 hrs of 898 required) 10-45 hours 

Center for Science and Mathematics Education 

Sherry Herron, Ph.D., Director 

118 College Drive #5087 

Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001 

(601) 266-4739 

Affiliates: Bateman, Brown, Contreras, Curry, Cwikla, M. Davis, Ding, Gandy, Heinhorst, Henry, Herron, 

Hudson, Johnson, Lee, McDowell, Moore, Peters, Pope, Pye, Ross, Russell, Sirola, Walker, Wliitehead, Yuen 

The Center for Science and Mathematics Education, recognizing the national goal of improving the 
delivery of science instruction and the accompanying demand for individuals with advanced degrees 
in science education, provides programs for the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in 
Science and Mathematics Education. 

Master of Science Program 

The program of study at the master's degree level is designed to increase the professional 
competency of science and mathematics teachers and to provide the coursework necessary to 
meet standards of teaching certification at this advanced level. The Master of Science in Science 
Education degree is offered with an emphasis in biology, chemistry, coastal science, marine science, 
mathematics, earth and environmental sciences, or physics. The program outcomes expressed in 
terms of student learning include demonstration of (a) graduate-level mastery of knowledge in 
the student's selected emphasis area; (b) the ability to integrate content knowledge into curricular, 
instructional, and assessment strategies for students at different educational levels; and (c) the 
ability to formulate, implement, and sustain changes in reforming science education to meet national 
standards at a school level. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general admission and academic requirements for all graduate programs as set 
forth in this Bulletin, regular admission to the master's program in science education requires a 
bachelor's degree in any area of science (or combination of science and professional education) 
and a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in undergraduate study. A Mississippi Department of 
Education Class-A license is required if advancement to a Class-AA licensure is desired. Applicants 
are required to present to the center director for consideration verbal and quantitative scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination, three letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the 
applicant's readiness for graduate study (letters should be sent to the center), and a one- to two-page 
statement of the applicant's teaching philosophy in the areas of knowledge to be addressed, teaching 
methodology, and assessment. 

Students who fail to meet the criteria for regular admission may be considered for conditional 
admission if the Program Admissions Committee, center director, dean of the college, and University 
Director of Graduate Studies are satisfied that the applicant shows promise of successfully 
completing graduate degree requirements. Regular admission will be granted with the completion 
of nine (9) semester hours of Southern Miss graduate work (500 level or higher) with a minimum 
of a B average on all courses taken while completing this nine (9)-hour requirement, the removal of 
deficiencies, and a positive recommendation from the student's adviser. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of the first semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available at 
www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Studv" 
link. 



226 || College of Science and Technology 



Degree Requirements 

The master's degree requires a minimum of thirty-four (34) semester hours of graduate work with a 
3.0 GPA as specified below (18 hours must be 600 level or higher) 

(a) Twenty-one (21) semester hours in a content area with a minimum of 12 hours in the emphasis area 
and a minimum of 3 hours in a related discipline 

(b) Six (6) semester hours in professional education (REF 601 and REF 607 if seeking A A certification 
in the State of Mississippi) 

(c) Seven (7) semester hours in science education (including SME 601, SME 561, and limiting hours 
of special problems to 3 semester hours) 

After completing 1 8 semester hours of required courses, the student should arrange a three-member 
graduate committee with the approval of the Center Director. To graduate, students must complete 
an approved program of study with a 3.0 grade point average, complete written comprehensive 
exams or compile and submit a portfolio showing evidence of mastery of the program learning 
outcomes, and pass an oral comprehensive examination. The student's graduate committee will be 
responsible for monitoring the student's progress, administering the comprehensive examination, 
and determining if all criteria have been met for graduation. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 

Doctor of Philosophy Program 

The Center for Science and Mathematics Education offers programs leading to the Doctor of 
Philosophy in Science Education with emphasis in biology, chemistry, coastal science, computer 
science, earth and environmental sciences, marine science, mathematics, medical technology, 
physics, or polymer science. 

Within the framework of the overall curriculum requirements, programs are planned to 
accommodate the professional goals of the individual graduate student. For students holding 
Class-AA certification from the Mississippi State Department of Education, the doctoral program 
in each emphasis area can be planned to provide for Class-AAAA advanced certification if desired. 
Graduates of the program are prepared as candidates for teaching positions at the secondary school, 
community college, and senior college levels as well as positions in curriculum supervision, 
curriculum development, educational research, and the informal delivery of education in their 
chosen discipline. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general admission and academic requirements for all graduate programs as set 
forth in this Bulletin, regular admission to the doctoral program in science education requires a 
master's degree, a Class-AA teaching certificate in one of the emphasis areas if an advance in 
certification to Class-AAAA is desired, three years of teaching experience at the secondary or 
college level, and a minimum GPA of 3.5 for all previous graduate work. Applicants are required to 
present for consideration verbal and quantitative scores on the Graduate Record Examination, three 
letters of recommendation, and a letter of intent expressing academic, professional, and research 
goals to the center director. Letters of recommendation should be from persons qualified to assess 
the applicant's readiness for graduate study and should be sent to the center. 

Initial admission to the program will be conditional for all students. Students are expected to possess 
proficiency at the undergraduate level in the chosen emphasis for advanced study. Students not 
proficient may be required to take additional undergraduate courses. Regular status will be granted 
with the completion of 9 semester hours of Southern Miss SME graduate courses numbered 600 
level or higher with a 3.25 GPA, a positive recommendation from the center director, the removal of 
any deficiencies, and acceptable performance on the qualifying examination. 

Plan of Study. Students must submit their signed, official Plan of Study Form to the Graduate Studies 
Office by the end of die second semester they are enrolled. The Plan of Study Forms are available 
at www.usm.edu/graduatestudies - click on "Current Students" and then the "Plans of Study" 
link. 



College of Science and Technology 



227 



Program Requirements 

The doctoral degree in science education requires a minimum of fifty-seven (57) semester hours of 
graduate work beyond the master's degree, excluding the hours for the dissertation and research tool 
requirements, as specified below. 

(a) Twenty-four (24) semester hours in a content area with a minimum of 15 hours in an emphasis 
discipline 

(b) Twenty-four (24) semester hours in science education including three (3) semester hours of 
seminar, SME 691, SME 701, SME 703, SME 700 or SME 720, and SME 725 for students in the 
mathematics emphasis with a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of SME 791 and a maximum of 
diree (3) semester hours of SME 792 

(c) Nine (9) semester hours of electives to be chosen from science education, emphasis discipline, or 
related discipline and with a minimum of three (3) hours in professional education. 

(d) Comprehensive exam 

(e) Dissertation and oral defense of dissertation (12 hrs of 898 required) 

Research Tool 

Additional requirements include demonstrated proficiency in a research tool, usually educational 
statistics (REF 761 and 762)and independent research culminating in an acceptable dissertation. 
The research may focus on a problem in the student's emphasis area that is related to the teaching/ 
learning of the discipline or a more general educational research problem. 

Qualifying Exam 

The department requires a written qualifying examination. This examination is designed to assess 
both the student's fitness to pursue doctoral work and to provide diagnostic information to the 
student's committee in planning a program. The student's program will be directed by a five- 
member graduate committee consisting of two faculty members affiliated with the Center for 
Science and Mathematics Education, one from the emphasis discipline, one from educational 
research, and one open for selection according to the student's research focus. The committee will 
approve the student's program plan and dissertation prospectus, and conduct the comprehensive 
examination, which is administered near the completion of the student's coursework. Upon 
acceptance of the dissertation by the student's committee and at least four weeks prior to graduation, 
a final oral examination in defense of the candidate's dissertation will be administered. 




i 

fe»»!tKSfl 

Bl!li§ 



Residency 

Students must meet the residency requirements specified in this Bulletin. 

Continuous Enrollment Requirement: Students must meet the requirement specified in the front 
section of this Bulletin. 



228 



Course Descriptions 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



INDEX FOR ABBREVIATIONS FOR FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 




ACC 


Accounting 


ACT 


Architectural Engineering 




Technology 


ADE 


Adult Education 


AEC 


Architecture-Engineering 




Construction 


AJ 


Administration of Justice 


AMS 


American Studies 


ANT 


Anthropology 


ARE 


Art Education 


ART 


Art 


BCT 


Construction Engineering 




Technology 


BSC 


Biological Sciences 


BTE 


Business Technology Education 


CD 


Child Development 


CED 


Cooperative Education 


CET 


Computer Engineering 




Technology 


CHE 


Chemistry and Biochemistry 


CHS 


Community Health Sciences 


cm 


Curriculum and 




Instruction: Elementary 


CIR 


Curriculum and 




Instruction: Reading 


CIS 


Curriculum and 




Instruction: Secondary 


CISE 


Curriculum, Instruction, and 




Special Education 


COA 


Coastal Sciences 


COH 


College of Health 


COS 


Computational Science 


CS 


Computer Science (Gulf Coast) 


CSC 


Computer Science 


CSS 


Computer Science and 




Statistics 


DAN 


Dance 


ECO 


Economics 


ED 


Economic Development 


EDA 


Educational Administration 


EET 


Electronics Engineering 




Technology 


ENG 


English 


ESC 


Environmental Science 


FAM 


Family Studies 


FCS 


Family and Consumer Sciences 


FIN 


Finance 


FL 


Foreign Languages 


FLM 


Film 


FMA 


Fashion Merchandising 


FRE 


French 


FSC 


Forensic Science 


GER 


German 


GHY 


Geography 


GLY 


Geology 


GRK 


Greek 


GS 


General Studies 



HE 


Higher Education Administration 


HIS 


History 


HM 


Hospitality Management 


HPR 


Human Performance and 




Recreation 


HYD 


Hydrographic Science 


IB 


International Business 


ID 


Interior Design 


IDV 


International Development 


IET 


Industrial Engineering Technology- 


IT 


Instructional Technology 


ITA 


Italian 


ITC 


Information Technology 


LAT 


Latin 


LIS 


Library and Information Science 


MAR 


Marine Science 


MAT 


Mathematics 


MBA 


Master of Business 




Administration 


MC 


Mass Communication 


MCJ 


Mass Communication and 




Journalism 


MED 


Music Education 


MGT 


Management 


MIS 


Management Information 




Systems 


MKT 


Marketing 


M-REP 


Mathematics Refresher and 




Enrichment Program 


MTC 


Medical Technology 


MUP 


Music Performance Studies 


MUS 


Music 


NFS 


Nutrition and Food Systems 


NSG 


Nursing 


PHI 


Philosophy 


PHY 


Physics 


PLG 


Planning 


PS 


Political Science 


PSC 


Polymer Science 


PSY 


Psychology 


REF 


Research and Foundations 


REI 


Real Estate and Insurance 


REL 


Religion 


SCM 


Speech Communication 


SHS 


Speech and Hearing Sciences 


SME 


Science and Mathematics Education 


SOC 


Sociology 


SPA 


Spanish 


SPE 


Special Education 


SWK 


Social Work 


THE 


Theatre 


THY 


Therapy 


TOE 


Technical and Occupational 




Education 


TSL 


Teaching English to Speakers of 




Other Languages 


WS 


Women's Studies 


WTD 


Workforce Training Development 



The plus (+) sign in front of a course indicates that a special fee is charged for that course. 
(See SPECIAL FEES AND EXPENSES in this Bulletin.) 



Course Descriptions jj 229 



Accounting (ACC) 

511. Accounting for Decision-Making. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Computer literacy. A conceptual study of financial and managerial 

accounting principles designed to enable decision makers to properly use accounting information in making decisions.. 
See also MBA 511. 

5 1 2. Seminar on Contemporary Accounting Topics. 1 .5 hrs. Selected readings and discussions of current accounting topics 

560. Managerial Accounting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 511 or the equivalent. An analysis of the use of accounting 
information in managerial decision making. 

598. International Accounting Seminar Abroad. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of program director. Conducted in London, 
England; a series of lectures and discussions involving authorities on international accounting issues and practices. 

605. Current Accounting Theory & Research. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 15 hours of accounting above accounting principles. A 
study of financial accounting literature and the use of databases to solve contemporary accounting problems. 

610. Advanced Auditing. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 15 hours of accounting above accounting principles including ACC 409. A 
study of the professional practice of auditing and the role of theory, methodology, and technology. 

620. Advanced Cost/Managerial Accounting. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 320. A study of the theory associated with, and 
systems and procedures designed to develop and integrate accounting data for management. 

630. Tax Seminar I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 330 or equivalent. Tax planning with emphasis on corporations, partnerships, 
tax option corporations, and tax administration and practice. 

631 . Tax Seminar II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACC 330 or equivalent. Tax planning and research with emphasis on exempt entities, 

trusts and estates, transfer taxes, and the ethical responsibility of tax practice. 

660. Controllership. 3 hrs. The interrelationship of the controller and modern information systems. 

692. Special Problems in Accounting. 1-6 hrs. Individual study of specific topics in accounting. 

699. International Accounting Research Abroad. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of program director. A research course in 
international accounting offered for students enrolled in ACC 598. 



Administration of Justice (A J) 



500. Graduate Practicum in Criminal Justice. 3-9 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of chair. Blends theory and practice in a public 
or private criminal justice career field; it will not count toward course requirements for the degree. 

520. Methods of Criminal Justice Research and Planning. 3 hrs. An in-depth study of criminal justice planning, evaluation, 
and research. 

526. Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. 3 hrs. A study of foreign cruninal justice systems, with emphasis on how diey 
suggest possible reforms for the American system. 

530. Criminal Procedure. 3 hrs. A survey of procedural criminal law. Due process, statute of limitation, venue, and double 
jeopardy are covered. 

531. Environmental Law. 3 hrs. A study of environmental law emphasizing regulation, enforcement, and detection of 
unlawful practices damaging to die environment. 

533. Evidence, Search, and Seizure. 3 lus. An examination of laws of evidence and the procedures for obtaining it, with 
special emphasis on application in criminal court. 

535. Organization and Management of Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. Principles and theories of management of criminal justice. 

540. Police in the United States. 3 hrs. A study of the policies and human issues affecting law enforcement agencies in the 
United States. 

542. Advanced Criminal Investigation. 3 hrs. Specialized areas of investigation such as cybercrimes, interview and 
interrogation, statement analysis, serial crimes, and terrorism. 

550. Administration of Criminal Corrections. 3 hrs. An in-depth study of administration of correctional systems, including 
management, the incarceration process, probation, and parole. 

560. Juvenile Justice Systems. 3 hrs. A study of police in delinquency prevention, investigation of juvenile crime, disposition 

of offenders, and juvenile courts. 

561. Juvenile Corrections. 3 hrs. Course provides the student interested in juvemle corrections with an in-depth perspective 

of the numerous treatment modalities currentiy in use. 

563. Family Law. 3 hrs. An in-depth study of common law and statutory law relating to the family, emphasizing legal 
remedies to violence and its effects on the criminal justice system. 

564. Family Violence, Investigation, and Deterrence. 3 hrs. A study of child and spousal abuse within the family, 
emphasizing detection, investigation, and deterrence. 

570. Political Economy of Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. A study of the politics and economics of crime and justice. 



230 Course Descriptions 



i: 



571 . Victims of Crime. 3 hrs. Provides an in-depth study of factors that affect the victims of crime. Specific crimes are studied 

and remedies explored. 

572. Organized Crime. 3 hrs. A course to familiarize students with the evolution, typology, and etiology of organized crime 

in the United States. 

575. Private Security: Law and Loss Prevention. 3 hrs. Basic concepts of the private security industry and the law that 
controls and directs the profession. 

580. Seminar in Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. A seminar course dealing with all aspects of the criminal justice system, tying 
together the knowledge of criminal justice previously learned. 

582 Criminal Justice Ethics. 3 hrs. An examination of the myriad of ethical dilemmas that arise in the criminal justice 
system, and of tools for nurturing an ethical life. 

589. Caribbean Studies. 3 hrs. A comparative study of criminal law, courts, and corrections through lectures, field exercises, 
and research 

598. British Studies: Comparative Criminal Jurisprudence. 3-6 hrs. A comparative study abroad of criminal law, courts, 
and procedures. 

599. British Studies: Comparative Drug Law. 3-6 hrs. A comparative study of the instructional responses to drug abuse and 

related criminal offenses and an analysis of their differences. 

600. Seminar in Theory of Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CJ 325 or equivalent, and consent of instructor. An 
intensive examination of the theory of justice generally, and of corrective justice in particular, exploiting the published 
works of leading thinkers from Plato to the present. 

620. Advanced Research Methods for Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CJ 520 or consent of instructor. Research 
theory and methodology in criminal justice, research designs, conceptual models, design and preparation of master's 
thesis prospectus. 

625. Seminar in Criminal Justice Planning and Research. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: A basic statistics course or its equivalent and 
consent of instructor. A study of criminal justice planning methodology and research requirements. 

630. Seminar in Civil Liberties and Criminal Law. 3 hrs. A study of the legal and moral responsibility of the criminal justice 

system to individual rights. 

631. Seminar in Anglo-American Criminal Law and Procedure. 3 hrs. A detailed study of topics in English criminal law 

and procedure onented toward understanding the basis of American criminal justice and solutions to common problems. 

640. Proseminar in Police Administration. 3 hrs. A study of legal issues involved in the administration of a modem police 
agency. 

650. Proseminar in Corrections. 3 lirs. An analysis of comparative treatment metiiodologies utilized by correctional 
programs throughout the United States and in Europe. 

660. Seminar in Juvenile Law. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CJ 460/560 or approval of professor. An in-depth study of specific 
problems in die law pertaining to battered, neglected, and delinquent children and their families. 

692. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs Permission of instructor. 

697 Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a diesis, consulting with die major professor, or using odier resources of the university may enroll in tins 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of diesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. 

699. Seminar in Advanced Topics in Comparative Criminal Justice. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CJ 426/526 or approval of 
professor. Study abroad of selected topics of foreign criminal justice systems. Emphasis is on theory. 

700. Qualitative Research and Analysis. 3-6 hrs. A tutorial examining qualitative research mediods, the principal tiieoretical 
literature of justice, and the role of qualitative methods in the student's area of study. 

710 Research and Analysis in Legal Inquiry. 3 hrs. A tutorial examining legal research methods, the major holdings of 
jurists pertaining to justice ao'ministration, and the role of legal research in the student's area of study 

720 Quantitative Research and Analysis. 3-12 hrs. A tutorial examining quantitative research methods, the leading studies 
injustice aclministration, and the role of quantitative methods in die student's area of study. 

72 1 . Applied Regression analysis in Justice Administration. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CJ 520, 625, 629, AJ 700, and consent of 
instructor. Advanced analysis in regression and discriminate function injustice administration. 

740. Administration of Justice. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CJ 535 or CJ 550. Survey of administration and management patterns in 
justice administration. 



Course Descriptions J 231 



797. Independent Study and Research. 3-12 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

898. Dissertation. 1-12 hrs. Prerequisites: AJ 700, 710, 720 and completion of all doctoral cognates. 

Adult Education (ADE) 

540. Methods and Materials in Adult Education. 3 hrs. A course in teaching methods and the format of instructional 
materials for adults with emphasis on self-instructional techniques. 

541. Foundations of Adult Literacy Instruction. 3 hrs. This course involves an examination of the basis of reading 
instruction for the low literate adult 

542. Methods and Materials for Adult Literacy Education. 3 hrs. Instructional and diagnostic materials and methods for 
dealing with functionally illiterate adults. 

545. Sociocultural Context of Adult Education.. 3 hrs. A study of education for adults whose educational experiences were 
not priviledged, including adults with language, literacy, and numeracy needs; adults with disabilities; some ethnic and 
migrant groups; economically disadvantaged adults; and adults who have experienced violence and/or abuse. 

576. Learning in Adult Education. 3 hrs. A study of adult development and adult learning theories. 

580. Applied Educational Gerontology. 3 hrs. This course prepares individuals to design and implement educational 
programs for older adults. 

590. Special Problems in Adult Education. 1-3 hrs. Special areas of interest arranged for an individual or a group with 
common interests. 

601. Foundations of Adult Education. 3 hrs. A survey of the history, philosophies, form, structure, and current developments 

in the field of adult education. 

602. Organization and Administration of Adult Education. 3 hrs. A survey of organizational and management theory as 
applied to adult education agencies. The case study approach is used. 

603. Human Resource Development as a Special Form of Adult Education. 3 hrs This course explores human 
resource development in organizations with a focus on adult learning taking place in business, governement, and 
non-profit entities. 

607. Program Planning and Curriculum Development in Adult Education. 3 hrs. The design of programs and courses of 
study related to a wide variety of adult education agencies. 

650. Issues in Adult Education. 3 hrs. Examination of contemporary issues related to the education and learning of adults in 
a seminar format. 

692. Special Problems I, II, HI. 1-3 hrs. A study to develop knowledge and facility in a field of special interest to the student 
Requires preparation of a scholarly paper under supervision of a graduate professor. 

701. Delivery Systems for Adult Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ADE 601 and ADE 607. Introduction and orientation to a variety 
of organizations and agencies responsible for conducting adult education programs. 

737. Internship in Adult Education. 3-6 hrs. A direct work experience in an adult education setting unrelated to student's 
employment. 

741. Assessment in Adult Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ADE 576, REF 601, or permission of instructor. Explore, develop, 
and evaluate various assessment methods and strategies used in adult education. 

750. Education and the Older Adult 3 hrs. A study of the older adult and the implications of those characteristics for adult 
education programs. 

760. Readings in Adult Education. 3 hrs. Students select readings in the adult education literature for discussion in a seminar 
format. 

791. Research in Adult Education. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of die major professor. 

792. Special Problems. 3 hrs. 

794. Field Problems in Adult Education I, II, III. 1-3 hrs. air. A project dealing with a specific problem in an adult education 
agency. Registration must be approved by student's major professor and departmental chair. 

797. Independent Study and Research. 3 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 



§1 



§t 



232 jj Course Descriptions 



798. Specialist Thesis. 6 hrs. A field study or thesis-type research study representing the major research component of the 
specialist's degree. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 

American Studies (AMS) 

504. Issues in America. 3 hrs. Topics vary according to professor and department 

599. British Studies: Anglo-American Studies. 3-6 hrs. A seminar conducted in Great Britain under the auspices of the 
Center for International and Continuing Education. 



Anthropology (ANT) 

516. Ethnographic Field Methods. 1-6 hrs. Methods of ethnographic fieldwork through participation in organized field 
studies. Penmssion of instructor required. 

520. Culture and Ethnicity. 3 hrs. An analysis of culture and ethnicity with special reference to die problem of modernization. 

521. Anthropological Theory. 3 hrs. A general survey of historical anthropological thought and of the major contemporary 

schools of anthropological theory. 

522. Ecological Anthropology. 3 hrs. An examination of human cultural strategies for adaptation to different environments. 

523. Economic Anthropology. 3 hrs. The evolution of economic systems, cross-cultural analysis of economic systems, and 
the role of economic forces in cultural change. 

524. Religion and Healing. 3 hrs. This course studies several examples of religious healing practices found in ethnographic 
literature creating a dialogue between indigenous and academic theories of healing. 

525. Kinship and Social Organization. 3 hrs. A comparative study of kinship and social organization, and a survey of the 
major anthropological theories concerning organizational variability. 

526. American Folklore. 3 hrs. An analysis of folklore, oral narratives, performance, and material culture with special 
reference to America and the American Soudi. 

527. Psychological Anthropology. 3 hrs. Cross-cultural analysis of personality formation, perception and cognition, and 
mental illness. 

528. Political Anthropology. 3 hrs. A comparative survey of patterns of group decision-making, leadership, resolution of 
conflict, and social control in human societies. 

529. Topics in Cultural Anthropology. 3 hrs. Variable content. May be repeated diree times in separate topical offerings. 

531. Advanced Prehistoric Analysis. 3 hrs. Corequisite: ANT 53 1L. Overview of analytical techniques and prehistoric 
technologies. 

53 1 L. Advanced Prehistoric Analysis Laboratory. 1 hr. Laboratory to accompany Advanced Prehistoric Analysis (ANT 
531). 

533. Prehistory of Southeastern Indians. 3 hrs. A survey of the prehistoric archaeology of the southeastern United States, 
especially Mississippi and adjoining states, from first inhabitants to the time of European contact 

534. Historical Archaeology. 3 hrs. A study of questions and techniques used on archaeological sites dating from the 15th 

century to the early 20th century 

535. Urban Archaeology. 3 hrs. An examination of archaeological remains recovered in American cities. 

536. Archaeology Field Methods. 3-6 hrs. Metiiods of fieldwork through participation in organized field projects. 

537. Heritage Resources and Public Policy. 3 hrs. The history and present state of public policy issues related to 
archaeological and historic resources, and their role in the planning process. 

539. Topics in Archaeology. 3 hrs. Variable content May be repeated three times in separate topical offerings. 

541. Human Variation. 3 hrs. An examination of human biological variation, including its sources, its classification, and its 
expression in different environments. 

542 Medical Anthropology. 3 hrs. Introduction to the relationship between human culture and disease especially cross- 
. cultural comparisons of perception and treatment of illness. 

545. Bioarchaeology. 3 lirs. Metiiods and theories used in interpretation of skeletal and mortuary data in archaeological 
contexts. 

549. Topics in Physical Anthropology. 3 hrs. Variable content. May be repeated three times in separate topical offerings. 

551 . Language Planning, Culture, and Politics. 3 hrs. Study of language planning, cultural identity, and politics around the 

world. 

552. Language, Gender, and Culture. 3 hrs Cross-cultural study of the social basis of gender differences in language. 
559. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology. 3 hrs Variable content. May be repeated three times in separate topical offerings. 



Course Descriptions |J 233 



593. Irish Studies. 4 hrs. Variable content Lecture series and study in Ireland under the auspices of International Programs. 

594. Topics in Caribbean Anthropology. 4 hrs. Variable content; lecture series, study, and fieldwork (archaeological and 
ethnographic) in die Caribbean under the auspices of International Programs. 

599. British Studies. 3-6 hrs. Variable content. Lecture series and research offered abroad under the auspices of International 
Programs. 

601 . Teaching Anthropology. 1-3 hrs. An in-depth examination of the resources and techmques of introducing undergraduates 

to the discipline of anthropology. May be repeated three times. 

602. Researching Anthropology. 3 hrs. This course covers research and writing for professional anthropologists. 
Formulating hypodieses, collecting and analyzing data, and reporting are stressed. May be repeated for up to six (6) 
credit hours. 

605. Presenting Heritage L 3 hrs. This course is the first of a two-part seminar (with 606) on public history, folklore, and 
anthropology. It emphasizes theory and method in public presentation to prepare students for public sector employment 

606. Presenting Heritage II. 3 hrs. This course is die second of a two-part seminar (with 605) on public history, folklore, and 
anthropology, emphasizing the development and management of public humanities programming. 

607. Applied Anthropology. 3 hrs. The application of anthropology to the solution of contemporary social and cultural 
problems. 

621. Seminar in Ethnology. 3 hrs. A comprehensive examination of method and theory in contemporary sociocultural 
anthropology, focusing particularly on the problems of ethnographic production and comparative analysis. 

631. Seminar in Archaeology. 3 hrs. An in-depth examination of the method and theory of anthropological archaeology. 

641. Seminar in Physical Anthropology. 3 hrs. A comprehensive examination of the method and theory of physical 
anthropology. 

651. Seminar in Anthropological Linguistics. 3 hrs. An in-depth examination of die method and theory of anthropological 
linguistics. 

691. Cooperative Internship. 3-9 hrs. Prerequisites: Faculty approval. Supervised experience in specific professional settings 

arranged by the department witii public agencies. 

692. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 

697. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of diesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. 

792. Special Study Projects in Anthropology. 1-6 hrs. Special projects in reading, survey, or research in anthropology. 

Architectural Engineering Technology (ACT) 

526. Specifications. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An introduction to development and writing of architectural 
project specifications. 

548. Modeling and Animation Applications I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 132 or demonstrated computer-aided design and 
drafting experience. Computer modeling and animation developed with AutoDesk Viz. 

549. Modeling and Animation Applications II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ACT 548. Advanced topics in computer modeling and 
animation developed with AutoDesk Viz. 

550. Virtual Reality Applications I. 3 hrs. Comprehensive study of virtual reality techniques for real-time visualization of 

engineering technology topics. 

551. Virtual Reality Applications II. 3 hrs. Study of advanced virtual reality scenebuilding techniques. 

592. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Senior standing and approval of faculty adviser. 

605. Digital Imaging. 3 hrs. Processing, manipulating, and analyzing images while they are in the form of virtual discrete 
digital quantity. 



Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) 

505. Environmental Impact Statements. 3 hrs. Preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs) for projects with 
significant environmental impact. 

510. Foundations in Computer-aided Drafting and Design. 3 hrs. Fundamentals of computer use for drafting and design 
using commercial software. 



tell 

Mi 



234 J Course Descriptions 






520. Computer-aided Drafting and Design EL 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ENT 510. CADD applied to architectural and engineering 

drawing using AUTOCAD. Graphics programming in two and three dimensions. 

521. Computer-aided Design and Drafting DDL 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ENT 520 or CADD experience. Advanced CADD 
topics applied to architectural and engineering drawing using AutoLISP. 

530. Solar Heating and Cooling. 3 hrs. Corequisite: ENT 530L. Solar energy conversion methods; collectors; residential, 
commercial solar heating and cooling. Economics of solar energy. Total energy systems. 

530L. Solar Heating and Cooling Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: ENT 530. 

531. Environmental Safety. 3 hrs. Detection and control of harmful agents in working environments, such as vapors, gases, 

mists, radiation, and sound. 

53 1L. Environmental Safety Laboratory. 1 hr. 

532. Environmental Management Systems - ISO 14000 in Industry. 3 hrs. Study of environmental management systems, 
codes, standards, and development of a draft ISO 14000 environmental management system. 

550. Safety Compliance. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. A comprehensive overview of 
safety standards, regulations, concepts, and processes relating to the modem industrial workplace. 

551. Fire Safety. 3 hrs. Codes and technology used in fire prevention, detection, protection, and suppression. 

552. Ergonomics. 3 hrs. Standards, statutes, and technology used in ergonomic analysis of worksites. Prevention and control 
of ergonomic risk conditions. 

570. Electronics for Scientists. 3 hrs. Corequisite: ENT 570L. Practical electronics needed for maximum utilization of 
scientific instrumentation, automation, and logic circuits. 

570L. Electronics for Scientists Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: ENT 570. 

592. Special Problems. 1-6 lirs. Topics in Engineering Technology I. 

593. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Topics in Engineering Technology II. 

601. Cost Analysis and Control. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ENT 390. Applied cost control methods and techniques to establish 
prices of products for their targeted market segment. 

610. Advanced Quality Assurance. 3 hrs. Recent advances in quality assurance, customer focus, TQM, process capability, 
control charts, concurrent engineering, Taguchi's mediod, product liability and reliability, ISO 9000, QS-9000, Deming 
and Baldridge awards. 

640. Resources in Engineering Technology. 3 hrs. Operations management and technology, human and technical resources, 
forecasting, planning and control, project analysis, logistics and distribution, queuing systems. 

658. Problem Identification. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Identify the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding a 
specific problem, need or opportunity in the industry. 

668. Problem Preparation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Develop a well grounded proposal to address a 
specific problem, need, or opportunity in the industry. 

680. Engineering Technology Seminar. 1-6 hrs. Presentation of engineering technology industrial applications, practices, and 
problem solutions. May be repeated for a total of 6 hrs. 

688. Project Implementation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: AEC 668 and permission of instructor. Implement the project according to 
the proposal. Max of 8hr can be applied. 

691. Research. 1-6 hrs. Investigation of current research and literature in engineering technology; development of writing 
skills; a thesis/prospectus must be orally defended. A maximum of 3 hrs. can be applied toward a degree in engineering 
technology. 

692. Topics in Engineering Technology. 1-6 hrs. Investigation of specific topics related to engineering technology. May be 

repeated for a total of 6 hrs. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-12 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis or project, consulting with major professor, or using university resources and who are not in 
residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours, of thesis or project credit must enroll in this course for at least 3 hrs. 
each semester 

698 Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hours. Credit deferred until thesis is complete. 

699 Project. 1-3 hrs. for a total of 3 hours. Credit deferred until project is complete. 



Art (ART) 

500. The Art of Italy. 3 hrs. An examination of art in Italy. A travel/study course. 

513. Crafts IL 3 hrs. The creation and design of jewelry. 

514. Crafts IH. 3 hrs. The creation of surface designs for fabrics. 



Course Descriptions | 235 



531. Ancient Art History. 3 hrs. Art of the ancient world from the beginning of civilization to the fourth century. 

532. Medieval Art History. 3 hrs. Art of Europe from the fourth through 14th centuries. 

533. Northern Renaissance Art History. 3 hrs. Art of northern Europe during the 14th through 16th centuries. 

534. Italian Renaissance Art History. 3 hrs. Art of Italy during the 14th through 16th centuries. 

535. Baroque and Rococo Art History. 3 hrs. Art of Europe from the close of the 1 6th century through the 1 8th century. 

536. Nineteenth Century Art History. 3 hrs. 

537. Art 1900-1940. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 334. An analysis of Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada, and 
Surrealism. 

538. Art 1940-Present. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ART 334. An analysis of the many trends in art in the post- World War II period. 

550. Studio Art for MA.E. Students. 3 hrs. With the permission of the studio instructor(s) students may choose from studio 
areas offered by the department May be repeated. 

+570. Individually Directed Problems in Printmaking. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: *Study of appropriate pnntmaking media for 
advanced problems. May not be utilized to fulfill graduate degree requirements. May be repeated. 

598. British Studies, Art History. 3 or 6 hrs. Variable content. Lecture series and research offered abroad under the auspices 

of the Center for International and Continuing Education. 

599. British Studies, Art Studio. 3 or 6 hrs. Variable content. Studio series offered abroad under the auspices of the Center for 

International and Continuing Education. 

600. Studio Foundations. 3 hrs. A review, through studio problems, of some fundamental problems of plastic expression. 
Hours earned may not be used to fulfill degree requirements. Repetition may be required. 

601. Drawing Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in drawing. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

602. Drawing Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in drawing. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Pennission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

603. Drawing Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in drawing. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

610. Crafts: Jewelry Design for Teachers. 3 hrs. The study of visual forms as pertaining to die jewelry crafts. 

615. Trends in Current Plastic Expression. 3 hrs. A course designed to keep the student abreast of current trends in the 
plastic arts. 

620. Adapting Selected Current Art Trends to School Practice. 3 hrs. Current art trends are identified and selections of 
them are developed in terms of philosophies, practitioners, background, and techniques. 

621. Painting Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in painting. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

622. Painting Studio. 3 hrs. Fonn problems in painting. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 
of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

623. Painting Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in painting. Professional level of perfonnance with intense criticism. Permission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission 

631. Directed Museum and Gallery Tour. 1-3 hrs. Tour of museums and galleries for die purpose of viewing and studying 
original works. 

+65 1 . Ceramics Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+652. Ceramics Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+653. Ceramics Studio. 3 hrs. Pennission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+661 . Sculpture Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+662. Sculpture Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+663. Sculpture Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+671. Printmaking Studio. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: * and **.. Intensive graduate study and criticism in advanced printmaking 
problems. 

+672. Printmaking Studio. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: * and **. Intensive graduate study and criticism in advanced printmaking 
problems. 

+673. Printmaking Studio. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: * and **. Intensive graduate study and criticism in advanced printmaking 
problems. 

680. Workshop in Art I -3 hrs. Art experiences with variable content. May be repeated. 

701. Drawing Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in drawing. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

702. Drawing Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in drawing. Professional level of performance with intense criticism Permission 

of instructor and department chair required for admission. 



236 ij Course Descriptions 



703. Drawing Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in drawing. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 
of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

721. Painting Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in painting. Professional level of perfomiance with intense criticism. Pennission 
of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

722. Painting Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in painting. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 
of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

723. Painting Studio. 3 hrs. Form problems in painting. Professional level of performance with intense criticism. Permission 
of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

73 1 . Seminar. 1 hr. Seminar in art issues. 

732. Seminar. 1 hr. Seminar in art issues. 

733. Seminar. 1 hr. Seminar in art issues. 

739. Directed Study in Art History/Criticism. 1-6 hrs. for a total of six hours. 
+75 1 . Ceramics Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 
+752. Ceramics Studio. 3 hrs. Pennission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 
+753. Ceramics Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 
+761 . Sculpture Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 
+762. Sculpture Studio. 3 hrs. Pennission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 
+763. Sculpture Studio. 3 hrs. Permission of instructor and department chair required for admission. 

+771. Printmaking Studio. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: * and **. Intensive graduate study and cnticism in advanced printmaking 
problems. 

+772. Printmaking Studio. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: * and **. Intensive graduate study and criticism in advanced printmaking 
problems. 

+773. Printmaking Studio. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: * and **. Intensive graduate study and cnticism in advanced printmaking 
problems. 

+799. Creative Project 6 hrs. -An individually motivated, sustained project of original art works demonstrating professional 
competence and stature, culminating in an exhibition. Oral and written proposal and defense required. 

Art Education (ARE) 

600. Art Education Theory. 2 hrs. A comprehensive survey of art education trends and philosophies. 

601. Research in Art Education. 3 hrs. A lecture/study seminar of past and present art education research; emphasis on 
understanding the nature of educational research in art, various research methods, how research translates into practical 
classroom application; includes review, critique, application, and development of research topics. 

602. Art Techniques and Materials for Teachers. 3 hrs. A comprehensive survey of teaching techniques emphasizing the 
pedagogical potential and limitation of plastic media. 

603. Teaching the Visual Relationships. 3 hrs. A lecture/study seminar course dealing with the teaching of the visual 
characteristics and relationships, and integrating them with the cuirent practice and procedures in art education, including 
studio-based art experiences for students of all ages and ability levels; emphasis on individual student's studio strengths, 
augmented by curricula in two-dimensional and three-dimensional concepts, percepts, and materials. 

604. Teaching the Exceptional Student Contemporary Processes. 3 hrs. A course devoted to the pedagogical potential of 
contemporary processes for use with exceptional students. 

605. Techniques of Dissemination of Student Art Work. 3 hrs. Techniques of advanced pedagogy in the selection, display, 
and showing of student work. 

606. History and Philosophy of Art Education. 3 hrs. A lecture/study seminar course. History of art education; emphasis on 
changing philosophies, theories of learning, subsequent goals, and objectives made apparent in curriculum development. 

607. Teaching Studio Art. 3 hrs. Students will pursue studio endeavors whde considering methods, philosophies, and 
historical and contemporary issues in art and education. 

616. Advanced Art Education Seminar for Selected Topics. 3 hrs. Topics may include past and present approaches to 
curriculum development; special populations; aesthetics; art history, criticism; art and technology; art and society; critical 
analysis; philosophic reflections on art and art education; others. May be repeated for credit. 

2 625. Supervision of Art Education Programs. 3 hrs. A lecture/study seminar course on the problems and solutions involved 
^^^S m me su P erv i s ' on °f public school art programs in grades K- 1 2. 

626. Curriculum and Instruction in Art Education. 3 hrs. A lecture/study seminar course on past and present curriculum 
||jjj|9 instruction; includes historical component as foundation for understanding current teaching strategies; various teaching 

^^^S approaches are analyzed and formalized into applicable classroom art experiences. 



Course Descriptions || 237 



657. Aesthics. 3 hrs. Aesthetic theories are examined through critical strategies and ways of thinking intrinsic to philosophical 
aesthetics. 

680. Psychology of Art 3 hrs. A look ath the relationship between mind and ait Topics relevant to psychology, art, and 
creating are explored. 

690. Supervised Teaching. 3 hrs. Graduate students who are teaching at Southern Miss will design and implement curricula 
while considering philosophies and current issues in art education. 

691. Research Project in Art Education. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of the major professor. 

692. Special Problems in Art Education I, II, III. 1-3 hrs. each. 

697. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hours. A written thesis. 



Biological Sciences (BSC) 



500. History of Biology. 3 hrs. The development of biological sciences in western culture from pre-Socratic Greece to the 
present. 

501. Natural History of Animals. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Life histories of animals. 
501L. Natural History of Animals Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

502. Natural History of Plants. 1 hr. Prerequisite: BSC 226. Life histories of plants. 
502L. Natural History of Plants Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

503. Natural History of Infectious Diseases. 3 hrs. A study of infectious diseases and their effect on man. 

504. Field Biology. 1-2 hrs. arr. Ecological and taxonomic studies. Offered between semesters as four- and 12-day field trips. 
504L. Field Biology Laboratory. 2-4 hrs. To be taken concurrendy with BSC 504. 

505. Paleobiology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: General Zoology. Study of life fonns existing in preliistoric or geologic times as 
represented by plants, animals, and other organisms. 

505L. Paleobiology Lab. 1 hr. Corequisite: BSC 505. 

506. Biogcography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 110 and BSC 111; GHY 325 or BSC 340. Study of plant and animal 
distributions from geographic, geological and biological perspectives. 

507. Biology of Vertebrates. 3 hrs. Corequisite: BSC 507L. The ecology, evolution, behavior, and conservation of vertebrate 
animals. Field trips when possible. 

507L. Biology of Vertebrates Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 507. 

508. Invertebrate Zoology 1. 2 hrs. Functional morphology, systematics, and life histories of the phylum Ponfera tiirough the 

minor protostomes. 

508L. Invertebrate Zoology I Laboratory. 1 hr. 

509. Invertebrate Zoology II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Functional morphology, systematics, and life histories 

of advanced invertebrate phyla through the Hemichordata. 

509L. Invertebrate Zoology II Laboratory. 1 hr. 

510. Human Parasitology. 3 hrs. Life histories, medical significance, and diagnosis of helminths and protozoa parasitic in 



510L. Human Parasitology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

511. Entomology. 2 hrs. Structural adaptations, classification, life histories and habits, and the economic importance of 
insects. 

511L. Entomology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

512. Medical Entomology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Anthropod vectors and agents of disease. 
512L. Medical Entomology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

513. Arachnida Biology. 2 hrs. Biology, morphology, and classification of the arachnids. | 
5 13L. Arachnida Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. | 

514. Ichthyology. 2 hrs. Evolutionary relationships, morphology, physiology, and zoogeography of fishes, with emphasis on 



identification of local forms. 
514L Ichthyology Laboratory. 1 hr. 



3li 



238 |] Course Descriptic 



5 1 5. Biology of Fishes. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Function morphology, ecology, and behavior of fishes. 
51 5L. Biology of Fishes Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

516. Introduction to Fishery Science. 2 hrs. A survey of the biology, management, and potential yield offish populations. 
516L. Introduction to Fishery Science Laboratory. 1 hr. 

517. Herpetology. 3 hrs. Ecology, evolution, and natural history of amphibians and reptiles. Field trips when possible. 
517L. Herpetology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BSC 517 

518. Avian Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 361 recommended. Morphology, taxonomy, life liistory, distribution, evolution, 

and adaptations of birds. 

518L Avian Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

519. Mammalogy. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 361 recommended. Morphology, taxonomy, life history, distribution, evolution, 
and adaptations of mammals. 

519L. Mammalogy Laboratory. 1 hr. 

520. Speciation. 3 hrs. Origin and evolution of species. 

521. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. 3 hrs. Morphology, distribution and ecology of the phyla from Porifera through 
Protochordates. May be taken as COA 528 or MAR 503. 

521L. Marine Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 521. May be taken as COA 528L or MAR 
503L. 

523. Science and Society: From Copernicus to the Bomb. 3 hrs. Traces the development of science and technology and 
dieir role in society from the Renaissance to the present. (May be taken as HIS 523 and PHY 523.) 

524. Parasites of Marine Animals. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. Emphasis on morphology, taxonomy, life 
histories, and host-parasite relationships. May be taken as COA 553 or MAR 504. 

524L Parasites of Marine Animals Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 524. May be taken as COA 553L or MAR 
504L. 

525. Marine Phycology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: General botany and plant taxonomy. A survey of the principal groups of marine 

algae. May be taken as COA 533 or MAR 520. 

525L. Marine Phycology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 525. May be taken as COA 533L or MAR 520L. 

526. Introductory Mycology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 226. Systematics, morphology, physiology, and ecology of fungi. 
526L. Introductory Mycology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 526 

527. Introductory Phycology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Taxonomy, physiology, and biochemistry of algae. 
May be taken as MAR 520. 

527L. Introductory Phycology Laboratory. 1 hr. May be taken as MAR 520L. 

528. Plant Anatomy. 2 hrs. A study of the anatomy of vascular plants. 
528L. Plant Anatomy Laboratory. 1 hr. Prerequisite: BSC 226. 

529. Comparative Morphology of Plants. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Botany. Corequisite: BSC 529L. Life cycles, evolution, and 
morphology of vascular plants. 

529L. Comparative Morphology of Plants Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BSC 529. 

530. Aquatic and Marsh Plants. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 226. Collection, identification, and ecology of plants of fresh and 

brackish water. 

530L Aquatic and Marsh Plants Laboratory. 1 hr. 

531 . Plant Physiology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. The basic physiological processes of green plants. 
53 1L. Plant Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

532. Economic Botany. 2 hrs. Origin, distribution, and significance of plants most important to man. 
532L. Economic Botany Laboratory. 1 hr. 

533. Taxonomy of Local Flora. 2 hrs. Prerequisites; BSC 110, 111, 226 or consent of instructor. The nomenclature, 
classification, identification, and relationships of plants, with an emphasis on the local flora. 

533L. Taxonomy of Local Flora Laboratory. 2 hr 

534. Dendrology. 2 hrs. The taxonomic and ecological characteristics, and the distribution of trees. 
534L. Dendrology Laboratory. 2 hrs 

535. Plant Ecology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced standing in botany. Relationship of plants to their environment 
535L. Plant Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. 



Course Descriptions 



239 



536. Conservation Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced standing in botany and zoology, or permission of instructor. 
The biology of plant and animal populations in human-generated environments, with emphasis on their long-term 
management 

536L. Conservation Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 536. Lab consists of six day-long field trips held on 
Saturdays. 

537. Coastal Vegetation. 2 hrs. A study of general and specific aspects of coastal vegetation, with emphasis on local examples. 

May be taken as COA 534 or MAR 521. 

537L. Coastal Vegetation Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 537. May be taken as COA 534L or MAR 521L. 

538. Salt Marsh Plant Ecology. 2 hrs. The botanical aspects of local marshes: includes plant identification, composition, and 

structure. May be taken as COA 535 or MAR 522. 

538L. Salt Marsh Plant Ecology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 538. May be taken as MAR COA 535L or 522L. 

539. Marine Ecology. 3 hrs. The relationship of marine organisms to their environment. May be taken as COA 546 or MAR 

505. 

539L. Marine Ecology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 539. May be taken as COA 546L or MAR 505L. 

540. Ecology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The study of the relationships of organisms to their environment and 

to each other. 

540L. Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

541. Population and Community Ecology. 2 hrs. Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on natural populations and 

communities. 

54 1L. Population and Community Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

542. Behavioral Ecology. 3 hrs. The adaptive significance of behavior. 
542L. Behavioral Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 542. 

543. Freshwater Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The study of the biota of ponds, lakes, nvers, and streams. 
543L. Freshwater Biology Laboratory. 1 hr 

544. Limnology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 540 and consent of instructor. The physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of 

inland waters. 

544L. Limnology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

545. Introduction to Marine Biology. 3 hrs Prerequisites: BSC 110, 111, 201. Marine biological regimes and the influence of 

geological, physical, and chemical oceanographic factors. 

545L. Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 545. 

546. Aquaculture. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: 12 hours of biology and 8 hours of chemistry. Production of aquatic organisms in 
natural and artificial environments. 

546L. Aquaculture Laboratory. 1 hr 

547. Marine Aquaculture. 3 hrs. Problems and procedures relating to the culture of commercially important crustaceans, fish, 

and mollusks. May be taken as COA 524 or MAR 507. 

547L. Marine Aquaculture Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 547. May be taken as COA 524L or MAR 507L. 

548. Fauna and Faunistic Ecology and Tidal Marshes. 2 hrs. Taxonomy, distribution, trophic relationships, reproductive 
strategies, and adaptation of tidal marsh animals. May be taken as COA 547 or MAR 506. 

548L. Fauna and Faunistic Ecology of Tidal Marshes Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 548. Mav be taken as 
COA547LorMAR506L 

549. Marine Fisheries Management. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: statistics recommended. A statistical review of the world fisheries. 

May be taken as COA 5 1 6 or MAR 5 1 0. 

549L. Marine Fisheries Management Laboratory. 2 lirs. Corequisite for BSC 549. May be taken as COA 516L or MAR 
510L. 

550. Comparative Animal Physiology. 3 hrs. Organismic function and die adaptations which characterize major animal 
groups. ■ ' 

551. Mammalian Physiology. 3 hrs. The functions of mammalian systems; interrelationships and regulation are emphasized. 

552. Environmental Physiology. 3 hrs. Physiological adaptations enabling animals to meet environmental challenges. 

553. Invertebrate Physiology. 3 hrs. A functional approach to the major invertebrate phyla 

554L. Physiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Experimental techniques in physiology. To be taken once only, as an optional laboratory 
with BSC 550, BSC 551, BSC 552, or BSC 553. 



ill 



240 I Course Descriptions 



' ) 



555. Animal Behavior. 3 his. Classical and current concepts of animal behavior including individual and social behavioral 
patterns. 

555L Animal Behavior Laboratory. 1 lir. 

556L. Laboratory Techniques in Behavioral Neuroscience. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Experimental 
techniques in neurophysiology, neuropharmacology, and behavioral research (cross-listed as PSY 527L). 

557. Neurobiology. 3 hrs. Introduction to current understanding of the function of the brain, with emphasis on connections 
between molecular and behavioral studies of the nervous system. 

558. Marine Ichthyology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 16 semester hours of biology, including comparative anatomy, or consent of 
instructor. Marine fishes including evolutionary relationships, morphology, physiology; and zoogeography. May be 
taken as COA 521 or MAR 508. 

558L. Marine Ichthyology Lab. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 558. May be taken as COA 521L or MAR 508L. 

559. Marine Mammals. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of biology, including COA 301 or Marine Ichthyology, or 
permission of instructor. Natural history and population ecology of cetaceans. Will include life history, distribution, 
population dynamics, diet and feeding, social behavior, evolution, and zoogeography. May be taken as COA 543 or 
MAR 523. 

559L. Marine Mammals Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 559. May be taken as COA 543L or MAR 523L. 

560. Pharmacology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Vertebrate biology and organic chemistry. The response of living organisms to drugs. 

561 . Histology. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: 1 2 hours of biology. Microscopic anatomy of mammalian organ systems. 

561 L. Histology Laboratory. Must be taken concurrentiy with BSC 561 ; no separate credit given for the laboratory. 

562. Microtechnique. 1 hr. Techniques for sectioning, mounting, and staining tissue and making whole mounts. 
562L Microtechnique Laboratory. 2 hrs 

563. Pathobiology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 461 or 561. Principles of histopathology in vertebrates and invertebrates. 
563L. Pathobiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

565. Embryology. 2 hrs. Maturation, fertilization, cleavage, histogenesis, and organogenesis. 
565L. Embryology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

566. Human Embryology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 465 or 565. Factors which activate and regulate developmental processes. 

568. Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms. 3 hrs. Histology of marine organisms, including tissue processing 
techniques. May be taken as COA 556 or MAR 530. 

568L. Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 568. May be taken as COA 
556LorMAR530L. 

569. Developmental Biology. 3 hrs. A comprehensive survey of the experimental, genetic, and molecular analysis of processes 

that occur during the development of complex organisms. 

571 . Advanced Generics. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 370 or 475 or 575. A continuation of BSC 370. 

57 1L. Advanced Genetics Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 571. Laboratory exercises to illustrate basic genetic 
principles. 

572. Population Genetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 370 or consent of instructor. The process of evolutionary change. 

575. Medical Genetics. 3 hrs. The basic principles of human genetics, with emphasis on the causation of abnormality and 
disease. 

576. Molecular Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 370 or 477. Molecular biology of viral, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic systems. 

577. Microbial Genetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 370, 380. The genetics and molecular biology of microorganisms and 
viruses. 

577L. Microbial Genetics Laboratory. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Peimission of instructor. Laboratory exercises to demonstrate 
principles of bacterial and viral genetics. Must be taken concurrently with BSC 577. 

578L. Molecular Biology Laboratory. 4 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 576 or 577 or permission of instructor. The paradigms of 
molecular biology in a laboratory setting. 

579 Applications of Biotechnology in Marine Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 110, 111, 201, CHE 106, 107, 255, 
256; CHE 420/520 or 421/521, 422/522 recommended or permission of instructor. Basic biochemical and molecular 
techniques used to conduct research in marine biology. May be taken as COA 565. 

579L. Applications of Biotechnology in Marine Biology Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 579. May be taken as 
COA565L. 

581. Pathogenic Microbiology'. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 370, BSC 380, and BSC 576 or BSC 577 or permission of 
instructor. The molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis, emphasizing the major groups of disease-producing 
microorganisms. 



Course Descriptions j] 241 



58 1L. Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory. 1 hrs. 

582. Advanced Pathogenic Microbiology. 2 hrs. Continuation of BSC 581. 
582L. Advanced Pathogenic Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

583. Viral Ecology. 3 hrs. The interactions between viruses and their hosting species over a wide range of taxonomic levels 

with emphasis on evolutionary ecology and principal types of transmission cycles. 

584. Virology. 3 hrs. Viral classification, replication, and molecular biology. 
584L. Virology and Tissue Culture Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 584. 

585. Viral Pathogenesis and Diagnosis. 3 hrs. Fundamental principles of medical virology. 

585L. Viral Pathogenesis and Diagnosis Laboratory. 1 hr. Immunological, molecular, and histological techniques for 
diagnosis of viral diseases. 

586. Immunology and Serology. 3 hrs. Studies of infection, resistance, types of immunity, and hypersensitivity. 

586L. Immunology and Serology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BSC 586. A laboratory introduction to cellular and serologic 
immune reactions and their diagnostic usefulness. 

587. Microbial Physiology. 3 lirs. A comprehensive survey of bacterial structure, nutrition, and biochemistry. 
587L. Microbial Physiology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

588. Food Microbiology. 2 hrs. Microorganisms affiliated with the preparation, spoilage, pathogenicity, and sanitation of 
foods. 

588L. Food Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs 

589. Environmental Microbiology. 3 hrs. Microbiology of water/air/soil; bioremediation. 
589L. Environmental Microbiology - Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for BSC 589. 

590. Marine Microbiology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: General Microbiology. An introduction to the role of microorganisms in the 
overall ecology of the oceans and estuaries. May be taken as CO A 571 or MAR 509. 

590L. Marine Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for BSC 590. May be taken as COA 571Lor MAR 509L. 

594. Experimental Design and Data Analysis in Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: PSY 360, CSS 211 ch permission of the 
instructor. Design of experiments, statistical analysis of data and interpretation of analysis results for biological research. 

648. Aquatic Insect Ecology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 41 1, 440, 443. 

648L. Aquatic Insect Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

691. Research. 1-16 hrs. 

692. Special Problems. 2-6 hrs. 

697. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1 -6 hrs for a total of 6 hrs. 

706. Principles of Biological Systematics. 2 hrs. Theory and applications in the study of evolutionary relationships, including 

species concepts, nomenclature, homology assessment, phylogenetic inference, and classification. 

706L. Principles of Biological Systematics Laboratory. 1 hi. Corequisite: BSC 706. 

707. Planktology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Morphological adaptations, systematics, and life histories of plankton. 

707L Planktology Laboratory'. 1 hr. 

717. Advanced Herpetology. 2 hrs. Systematics, natural history, distribution, and economic importance of reptiles and 
amphibians. 

71 7L. Advanced Herpetology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

730. Plant-Animal Interactions. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 340 or equivalent. Overview of ecological and evolutionary » 
relationships between plants and animals, including pollination biology, dispersal ecology, carnivory and plant-herbivore \~ 
interactions. -p 

740. Topics in Marine Biology. 2 hrs. Current topics in marine research. j - ■ 

741. Fisheries Biology. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 416 or 516, or consent of instructor. Statistics and management of exploited g| 

fish populations. 

741L. Fisheries Biology Laboratory. 1 hr. 

742. Advanced Biological Oceanography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BSC 445 or 545 or permission of instructor. The sea as a 
biological environment 



ttfl 



242 jj Course Descriptions 



745. Landscape Ecology. 3 hrs. The ecology of spatially dynamic ecosystems. Fire, windstorms, land use, and the dilemmas 

they create for individual species. 
745L. Landscape Ecology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite of BSC 745. Spatial analysis in ecology. 

746. Current Topics in Population and Community Ecology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Upper-level ecology course or permission 

of instructor. The formation, organization, and control of biological populations and communities. 

750. Molecular Ecology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 370 and 440 or equivalents. Molecular genetic techniques in ecology, 
evolutions, behavior and conservation. 

750L. Molecular Ecology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Laboratory to accompany BSC 750. 

75 1 . Seminar in Animal Behavior. 3 hrs. Topics in the behavior and ecology of animals. 

760. Cell Ultrastructure. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Structure and function of cells and cell organelles at the 

subcellular level. 

761. Functional and Ecological Vertebrate Morphology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites. BSC 110, BSC 111, BSC 201, PHY 111, 

BSC 361, and BSC 36 1L recommended, or permission of instructor. An integrative, functional analysis of vertebrate 
structure related to ecological contexts. 

776. Topics in Gene Regulation. 4 hrs. An intensive review of the recent primary literature in molecular genetics and 
molecular biology, as defined by the topic chosen each semester. 

780. Principles of Immunochemistry. 3 hrs. A study of the chemistry of antigens, antibodies and complement, and the 
mechanism of their interaction. 

780L. Principles of Immunochemistry Laboratory. 1 hr. 

781. Immunohematology. 3 hrs. A study- of serological genetic, and anthropological aspects of human blood groups, 
isoantigens and antibodies. 

782. Advanced Microbial Physiology. 4 hrs. Concepts of microbial nutrition, metabolism, adaptation, and genetics as related 

to growth and environment. 

784L. Principles of Animal and Plant Cell Culture Laboratory. 2 hrs. Basic and advanced tissue culture techniques. 

785. Advanced Viral Pathogenesis. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: BSC 486 and BSC 484 or 485 or permission of instructor. Advanced 
consideration of host-viral interaction from a pathological and immunological perspective. 

787. Comparative Immunology 3 hrs. A comparative examination of the evolution development, functions, and mechanisms 
of natural and acquired immune defense in organisms throughout the phylogonetic spectrum. 

789. Microbiology Seminar. 1 hr. The presentation and defense of current, classical concepts and principles of microbiology. 

May be repeated for credit. 

790. Biology Seminar. 1 hr. The presentation of current concepts in special areas of individual interest. 

791. Research in Biology. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of the major professor. 

792. Special Problems. 2-6 hrs. 

793. Research in Zoology. 1-6 hrs. 

795. Research in Genetics. 1-9 hrs 

796. Research in Microbiology. 1-9 hrs. 

797. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

861 . Gross Anatomy. 3 hrs. 

861L. Gross Anatomy Laboratory. 2 hrs. 

864. Electron Microscopy. 1 hr. Theory and use of the electron microscope, ultramicrotome, and associated specimen 
preparation. 

864L. Electron Microscopy Laboratory. 2 hrs ; Corequisite for BSC 864. Practical use of the electron microscope and 
ultramicrotome. Introduction to specimen preparation and darkroom techniques. 

889. Environmental Microbiology 3 hrs. 



i 

3 898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 



Course Descriptions J 243 



Business Technology Education (BTE) 

510. Production and Integrated Processes for Business Education. 3 hrs. Advanced production and editing of documents 
with emphasis on speed and accuracy; completion of integrated projects using industry-current software. 

552. History and Philosophy of Vocational Education. 3 hrs. For business and distributive education teachers. History, 
concepts, trends, occupations, employment opportunities, procedures, and techniques. 

553. Techniques of Coordination. 3 hrs. A study of the techniques, procedures, problems, etc., in the operation of cooperative 

education programs. 

565. Multimedia Design in Business Technology Education. 3 hrs. Skill development in use of multiple software packages 
relative to business education. 

592. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. Study approved and directed by the department chair. 

608. Curricida in Business Education. 3 hrs. Factors influencing curriculum construction; content organization, instructional 
materials, and techniques. 

651. Principles of Business Education. 3 hrs. Junior high through university programs; guidance, qualifications and 
professional activities of teachers; and public relations. 

652. Seminar in Business Education. 3 hrs. An intensive study of specific problems in business education, and a survey of 

literature pertaining to the problems. 

653. Improvement of Instruction in Nonsldlls Subjects. 3 hrs. Methodology, instructional materials, evaluation, and review 

of significant research in the nonskill subjects of bookkeeping, basic business, and consumer economics. 

655. Improvement of Instruction in Skills Subjects. 3 hrs. Teaching procedures, instructional materials, measurement of 
skills, standards of achievement, and review of related research in typewriting, shorthand, and transcription. 

669. Research and Evaluation in Business Education. 3 hrs. Concept of evaluation; construction, selection, administration, 
and scoring of tests; review of related research. 

671. Dimensions of Learning in Business Technology Education 1. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CIS 603, 700; REF 632; SPE 500. 
Corequisites: REF 601. Seminar and field experience in business technology education. 

672. Dimensions of Learning in Business Technology Education IL 3 hrs. Prerequisite: BTE 671. Corequisite: CIR 754. 
Seminar and field experience in business technology education. Includes a classroom-based research project. 

680. Readings in Business Education. 3 hrs. Readings in both periodical literature and research. Presentation of findings in a 
scholarly report. Approval of department chair required. 

691. Research in Business Education 1-16 hrs. 

692. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: 9 semester hours of advanced courses in business education. Scholarly paper on 

approved problem. 

694. Field Problems. 3 hrs. 

697. Independent Study and Research. Hours arr. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively working on a 

thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this course. Students who 
are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working on a thesis, consulting with 
die major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at least 1 hour each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. 

701. Seminar in Business Education. 3 hrs. Analysis and evaluation of significant research studies in the field of business 
education and research of a problem. 

Chemistry and Biochemistry (CHE) 

500. Chemical Literature. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 256 and 311. The selection and use of tire reference materials of 
chemistry: periodicals, journals, texts, patents, and other sources of information. 

504. Spectral Elucidation of Structure. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Applications of vibrational, 
electronic, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy to structure determination. 

505. Problems in Chemistry. 3-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Undergraduate coursework in the area and permission of the instructor. An 

intensive review of specialized areas in chemistry. 

506. Modern Chemical Problem Solving I. 3 hrs. Chemical reactivity in the gaseous state and aqueous state, vm 
thermochemistry of reactions, oxidation/reduction processes, electrochemistry, and modem atomic theory as it is applied Kgi 
to bonding concepts and reactivity, and nuclear chemistry. ^* 

507. Modern Chemical Problem Solving IL 3 hrs. Physical and chemical aspects of liquids and solutions, thennodynainics, Sp 
kinetics, chemical equihbrium, acid/base equilibria, solubility and complex ion equilibria, and the transition metals. ,\ 

509. Chemistry Laboratory Teaching. 1 hr. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Instruction and practice for teaching £§£ 
assistants in the academic chemistry laboratory. &M 



244 jj Course Descriptions 



5 1 0. Safety Principles and Procedures in the Chemical Sciences. 1 hr. Common laboratory hazards and their remediation. 

511. Instrumental Analysis. 3 brs. Prerequisite: CHE 461, 461 L. Pre- or Corequisite: CHE 462, 462L. Theory and practice 

of instrumental methods of analysis; absorption spectroscopy, magnetic resonance, mass spectroscopy, electrometric 
methods, and fundamental electronics. 
5 1 1L. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CHE 511. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 511. 

520. Principles of Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 251 or equivalent. A one semester course surveying the 
fundamentals of biochemistry. 

520L. Principles of Biochemistry Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CHE 520. A laboratory course to accompany CHE 520 with 
emphasis on using knowledge of biochemical techniques in the student's profession. 

521. Biochemistry L 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 256. The properties of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; 

actions of enzymes and protein synthesis. 

521L. Biochemistry I Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite: CHE 521 . An optional laboratory course to accompany CHE 521. 

522. Biochemistry II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 521. Major metabolic pathways witii emphasis on energy considerations and inter- 
relationships of the pathways. 

522L. Biochemistry II Laboratory. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 521L. Corequisite: CHE 522. A continuation of CHE 521L. 

523. Analytical Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 521. A survey of methods used by biochemists to detect and 
characterize biologically important molecules. 

524. Biochemistry III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 521. Biochemical principles underlying nucleic acid structure, functions, and 

interactions with otiier biomolecules that mediate molecular changes in living organisms. 

531. Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 462. Electronic state transitions and spectra, coordination chemistry, 
reaction kinetics and mechanisms, special topics. 

531L. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CHE531. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 531. 

551. Intermediate Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. A survey of selected topics in organic chemistry to include medicinal, 
heterocyclic, and organometalhc chemistry. 

561. Physical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of die instructor. Chemical thermodynamics. 

561L. Laboratory for CHE 561. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 561. Concurrent registration in CHE 561 is 
required. 

562. Physical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Kinetics and quantum chemistry. 

562L. Laboratory for CHE 562. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to accompany CHE 562. Concurrent registration in CHE 562 is 
required. 

570. Toxicology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 256. A one-semester survey course in toxicology. 

600. Chemical Safety in the Teaching Laboratory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Application of the 
principles of chemical safety to the creation of a safe environment in high school and college science laboratories. 

601. Introductory Structural Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A study of symmetry, including 
group theory and point group designation, stereochemistry, and the origin of spectra. 

605. Chemical Analysis I. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 311 and CHE 256. Separation methods including chromatography and 
centrifugation. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

606. Chemical Analysis II. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 311 and CHE 256. NMR, ESR, mass spectrometry, and X-ray 
diffraction. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

607. Chemical Analysis III. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 31 1 and CHE 256. IR, UV-visible, ORD, CD, A A spectroscopy, flame 

photometry, and fiuorometry. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

608. Chemical Analysis TV. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 31 1 and CHE 256. Radiochemical, electrochemical, electrophoretic, 
and thermal analysis. Data handling. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

609. Applied Descriptive Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of die instructor. Principles of chemical periodicity 
applied to a laboratory based study of reactivity. 

611. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 411 or permission of instructor. Sampling, techniques, 
equilibria and activity, chemical and physical separations, and chemical methods of analysis. 

621. Advanced Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The interrelationships of metabolic pathways with 
emphasis on control mechanisms. 

651. Advanced Organic Chemistry. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Organic Qualifying Examination or in 
special instances, pennission of the instructor. The structure of organic compounds and their relationship to chemical 
bonding, stereochemistry, resonance, and reactivity. 

652. Advanced Synthetic Organic Chemistry I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 651. The synthesis of organic compounds 
emphasizing modem reagents and methods. 



Course Descriptions || 245 



661. Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Physical Chemistry, qualifying 
examination, or in special instances, permission of the instructor. Molecular and thennodynamic basis for chemical 
phenomena. Emphasis: Applications of thermodynamics and statistical thermodynamics to chemical disciplines. 

689. Chemistry Seminar. 1 hr. 

697 Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Consultation with and permission of major professor. 

702. Photochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 651 or permission of instructor. An introduction to the physical and chemical 
properties of the excited state. 

711. Analytical Spectroscopy. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: CHE 411. Quantitative determinations by I.R., visible, U.V., and X-ray 
spectroscopy techniques, including atomic emission and absorption. 

713. Analytical Separations. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Gas, ion exchange, and thin-layer chromatography; 
precipitation and crystallization; zone refining and electromigrauon. 

719. Current Topics in Analytical Chemistry. 3 hrs Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. Current topics of interest such as 
electroanalytical chemistry, instrumentation, chemometncs, new spectroscopic methods, etc. 

721. Proteins. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 521 or permission of instructor. Protein purification, methods of primary, secondary, 

and tertiary- structure detenninations, and the relationship between structure and biological activities. 

722. Physical Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 521. Application of physical-chemical methods to the study of 
biological macromolecules. 

723. Enzymes. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 521. Mechanisms of enzyme action, and the kinetics, regulation, and synthesis of 
enzymes. 

725. Lipids. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study of die structure, functions, and metabolism of lipids. 

726. Hormone Biochemistry. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. The structure, biosyndiesis, secretion, regulation, 

and mode of action of hormones. 

729. Current Topics in Biochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics of current interest in biochemistry 
such as neurochemistry, plant molecular biochemistry, photosynthesis, aging, and hormonal control. 

739. Current Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics of current interest such as 
transition metal complexes, reaction mechanisms or physical methods. 

751. Physical Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 651. Selected topics including application and use of quantum 
mechanics, kinetics, cryoscopy, isotopes, etc., to organic chemistry. 

752. Mechanisms of Organic Reactions. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 651. Mechanisms of organic reactions with emphasis on 

stereochemistry, kinetics, thermodynamics, and new developments as reported in chemical literature. 

755. Chemistry of Liquid Crystals. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 651. Survey of the structure, synthesis, and properties of the 
liquid crystalline state. 

759. Current Topics in Organic Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Topics of current interest in organic 
chemistry such as natural products, stereochemistry, and novel synthetic metiiodology. 

761. Special Topics in Statistical Thermodynamics. 3 hrs Prerequisite: CHE 661 or permission of instructor. Statistical 
mechanical theory and techniques applied to calculations of thermodynamics properties. Topics: theory of liquids, real 
gas behavior, etc. 

763. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 661 or permission of instructor. Development of 
quantum theory relating to energy levels and bonding in chemical systems. 

764. Elements of Diffraction. 4 hrs. Scattering, phase relationships, and structural techniques via diffraction for gases, liquids, 

solutions, and solids. Includes 3 hours of laboratory per week. 

769. Current Topics in Physical Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. Topics of current interest in physical 
chemishysuch as magnetic resonance, quantum theory, etc. 

789. Chemistry Seminar. 1 lir. 

791. Research in Chemistry. 1-15 lirs. Prerequisite: Approval of major instructor. 

797. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 



IIR 



II 



246 |j Course Descriptions 



811. Analytical Electrochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Thermodynamics of electrochemistry, 
theoretical derivation of electrochemical techniques, and applications thereof 

821. Biosynthetic Pathways. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An in-deptii study of selected metabolic pathways. 

822. Nucleic Acid and Protein Synthesis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 621 or permission of instructor. Protein and nucleic acid 

biosynthesis, with emphasis on biological control mechanisms. 
831. Organometallic Compounds. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CHE 631 and 651 or permission of instructor. The preparation, 
structure, physical properties and chemical reactions of compounds containing carbon-metal and carbon-metalloid 
bonds. 

851. A Survey of Heterocyclic Chemistry. 3 his Prerequisite: CHE 651. Nomenclature, synthesis, and reactions of the more 
common heterocyclic system 

861. Special Topics in Quantum Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 661. Topics of current interest in quantum chemistry 

such as magnetic resonance, electron spectroscopy, etc. 

862. Chemical Kinetics. 3 hrs. Experimental techniques of measuring chemical reaction rates and the mathematical treatment 

of rate data. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 

Child Development (CD) 

628. Assessment Procedures for Young Children with Disabilities. 3 hrs. To familiarize students with current issues, 
theories, and practices regarding the assessment of young children who are at risk for or have manifest disabilities. 

629. Advanced Intervention Procedures for Young Children with Disabilities. 3 hrs. To familiarize students with 
current issues, theories, intervention methods, and procedures for young children who are at risk for or have manifest 
disabilities. 

650. Theories in Child and Family Studies. 3 hrs. A survey of selected theories in child development and family studies and 
an examination of current problems and critical issues. 

652. Advanced Child Development 3 hrs. A study of children in early childhood, investigated in tight of personality 
development theories and current research. 

654. Seminar in Child Development 3 hrs May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Selected topics in child development 

655. Practicura in Child Care Administration. 3 hrs. 
688. Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities. 3 hrs. 

691. Research in Child Development 1-16 hrs. 

692. Special Problems in Child Development 1-4 hrs 

697. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a diesis, consulting with die major professor, or using other resources of die university must enroll in tiiis course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698 Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. 

Coastal Sciences (COA) 

505. Marine Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Biology, chemistry, calculus, and analytic geometry, or permission of instructor. 
Corequisite: COA 505L. Sea water chemistry and cycles and tiieir impact on the marine environment. Mav be taken as 
MAR 541 

505L. Marine Chemistry Laboratory- 1 hr. Corequisite for COA 505. A laboratory designed to accompany COA 505. May 
be taken as MAR 54 1L. 

506. Environmental Estuarine Chemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Biology, organic chemistry, calculus, and analytic geometry, 
or permission of instructor. Corequisite: COA 506L. Sources, reactions, transport, fate, and effects of environmental 
chemical species in aquatic environments with special emphasis on estuaries. May be taken as MAR 543. 

506L. Environmental Estuarine Chemistry Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite. COA 506. A laboratory designed to accompany 
COA 506. May be taken as MAR 543L. 

509. Coastal Marine Geology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: 12 hours in geology. A study of inshore and nearshore geological processes, 
sedimentation patterns, and landform development May be taken as MAR 582. 

516. Marine Fisheries Management. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Statistics recommended. Corequisite: COA 516L. A statistical 
review of the world fisheries. May be taken as MAR 510. 

516L. Marine Fisheries Management Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite. COA 516. May be taken as MAR 510L. 

517. Field and Laboratory Techniques in Marine Fisheries Science. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Fishery 
survey design, field techniques, and lab procedures for graduate students. Includes research cruises in offshore and 
inshore waters. 



Course Descriptions | 247 



521. Marine Ichthyology. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 52 1L. Marine fishes, including fish biology, ecology, evolution, and 
classification of marine and estuarine fishes. May be taken as MAR 508. 

52 1L. Marine Ichthyology Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 521. May be taken as MAR 508L. 

522. Elasmobranch Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: COA 301 and COA 521. Corequisite: COA 522L. This course will provide 
an overview of the biology of sharks, skates, and rays. 

522L Elasmobranch Biology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: COA 30 1L and COA 52 1L Corequisite: COA 522. This 
course will provide an overview of the biology of sharks, skates, and rays. 

524. Marine Aquaculture. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 524L. An introduction to principles and technologies applied to the 
culture of commercially important marine organisms. May be taken as MAR 507. 

524L, Marine Aquaculture Laboratory. 3 his. Corequisite: COA 524. May be taken as MAR 507L. 

528. Marine Invertebrate Zoology. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 528L. Morphology, distribution, and ecology of the phyla from 
Protozoa through Protochordates. May be taken as MAR 503. 

528L. Marine Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for COA 528. May be taken as MAR 503L. 

533. Marine Phycology. 2 hrs. Prerequisites: General botany and plant taxonomy. Corequisite: COA 533L. A survey of the 
principal groups of marine algae. May be taken as MAR 520. 

533L. Marine Phycology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for COA 533. May be taken as MAR 520L. 

534. Coastal Vegetation. 2 hrs. Corequisite: COA 534L. A study of general and specific aspects of coastal vegetation, with 
emphasis on local examples. May be taken as MAR 521 . 

534L. Coastal Vegetation Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for COA 534. May be taken as MAR 521L. 

535. Salt Marsh Plant Ecology. 2 hrs. Corequisite: COA 535L. The botanical aspects of local marshes; includes plant 
identification, composition, and structure. May be taken as MAR 522. 

535L, Salt Marsh Plant Ecology Laboratory. 2 hrs Corequisite for COA 535. May be taken as MAR 522L. 

536. Marine Botany. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: General biology (BSC 110 and BSC 111), general botany (BSC 226); consent 
of instructor. An overview, including local examples, of the principal groups of marine microalgae, macroalgae and 
submerged aquatic and emergent marine flowering plants, with a primary focus on their identification and ecology. The 
lecture and laboratory work for this course are interlaced so tliat, following the lecture material, laboratory examination 
of the algae are made. On three occasions, once per week, all-day field trips m die vicinity of the Mississippi Sound and 
to the barrier islands are made to observe algae and aquatic/emergent vegetations, the ecological relationships of these 
flora, and for collecting material for study in the laboratory. 

536L. Marine Botany Lab. 1 hr. Corequisite: COA 536. A laboratory for Marine Botany. 

543. Marine Mammals. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 16 hours biological sciences or permission of instructor. Corequisite: COA 
543L. Course will emphasize natural history and population ecology of cetaceans. Will include life history, distribution, 
population dynamics, diet and feeding, social behavior, evolution, and zoogeography. May be taken as MAR 523. 

543L, Marine Mammals Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for COA 543. May be taken as MAR 523L. 

544. Cetecean Behavior. 3 hrs. Review of the literature on the behavior, communication, and cognitive abilities of whales 
and dolphins as well as field trips and real time observations of marine mammals. 

546. Marine Ecology. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 546L. The relationship of marine organisms to their environment May be 
taken as MAR 505. 

546L. Marine Ecology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for COA 546. May be taken as MAR 505L. 

547. Fauna and Faunistic Ecology of Tidal Marshes. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Corequisite: COA 547L. 
Taxonomy, distribution, trophic relationsliips, reproductive strategies, and adaptations of tidal marsh animals. May be 
taken as MAR 506. 

547L. Fauna and Faunistic Ecology of Tidal Marshes Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for COA 547. May be taken as MAR 
506L. 

553. Parasites of Marine Animals. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 553L. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Emphasis on 
morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host-parasite relationships. May be taken as MAR 504. 

553L Parasites of Marine Animals Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for COA 553. May be taken as MAR 504L. : 

556. Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms. 3 hrs. Corequisite: COA 556L Histology of marine organisms, 
including tissue processing techniques. May be taken as MAR 530. 

556L. Comparative Histology of Marine Organisms Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for COA 556. May be taken as 
MAR530L. 

565. Applications of Biotechnology in Marine Biology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: 8 hrs. of zoology, general and organic 
chemistry; biochemistry recommended or permission of instructor Corequisite: COA 565L. Basic biochemical and 
molecular techniques used to conduct research in marine biology. 



248 J; Course Descriptions 



565L. Applications of Biotechnology in Marine Biology Laboratory. 3 hrs. Corequisite for COA 565. 

571. Marine Microbiology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: general microbiology. Corequisite: COA 571L. An introduction to the role 
of microorganisms in the overall ecology of the oceans and estuaries. May be taken as MAR 509. 

571L, Marine Microbiology Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite for COA 571 . May be taken as MAR 509L. 

585. Marine Science for Elementary Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Designed to acquaint teachers 
with marine science concepts. May be taken as MAR 558 or SME 535. 

586. Coastal Ecology for Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Corequisite: COA 586L. Designed to provide 
teachers with a background in basic coastal ecology. May be taken as MAR 559 or SME 559. 

586L. Coastal Ecology for Teachers Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite for COA 586. May be taken as MAR 559L or SME 
559L 

587. Techniques in Marine Science Education. 3 hrs. Designed to acquaint teachers with the marine resources of the 
Mississippi coastal zone. May be taken as MAR 556 or SME 556. 

588. Marine Science for Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Advanced topics in marine science. May be 
taken as MAR 557 or SME 557. 

590. Special Topics in Coastal Sciences. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. An informal study of current topics 
in coastal sciences designed for nondegree graduate students. May be repeated. 

601. Coastal Processes L 3 hrs. Abiotic processes, including physical, chemical, and geological factors that influence coastal 
environments. 

602. Coastal Processes II. 3 hrs. Biotic processes and interactions among pelagic, benthic, and land margin subsystems. 

603. Professional Skills in Coastal Sciences. 2 hrs. Course will include lectures and workshops designed to improve 
scientific writing, grantsmanship, and platform/poster presentation skdls. 

604. Research Tools in Coastal Sciences. 2-3 hrs. Research techniques will be discussed in instructive lectures and 
discussion sessions by faculty and outside investigators. Attendance at all sessions is required. Course may be repeated 
for credit. 

605. Data Analysis in Coastal Sciences. 3 hrs. Principles of data analysis and research, including study development, data 
handling, experimental design, and advanced statistical methods. 

607. Chemical Toxicology. 3 hrs. Course covers general principles and concepts of toxicology, test procedures, data 
evaluation and interpretation of specific effect measurements used by environmental scientists. 

608. Coastal Water Quality. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHE 107 or equivalent Course covers water quality measures in estuarine 
waters. Major topics are lab methods, field measurements, analysis problems, quality control, and interpretation. 

611. Sediments and Biota. 3 hrs. Course covers the vital influence of geology and sedimentation on marine habitats and 
environments. 

645. Benthic Ecology. 3 hrs. Corequisite. COA 645L. Benthic processes, adaptations, recruitment, spacial patterns, trophic 
dynamics, and diversity. 

645L Benthic Ecology Lab. 2 hrs Corequisite: COA 645. Hypothesis development, experimental designs, data collection, 
and interpretation in benthic ecology. 

65 1 . Marine Symbiosis 1. 4 hrs. Examines a variety of symbiotic relationships ranging from phoretic to parasitic found in die 
local area by using lectures, demonstrations, and individual research projects. 

652. Marine Symbiosis II. 4 hrs. Examines a variety of symbiotic relationships ranging from phoretic to parasitic found in 
the local area by using lectures, demonstrations, and individual research projects. 

653. Parasite Ecology. 3 hrs. Population biology, evolutionary ecology, and epidemiology of parasites and pathogens. 

654. Describe Species I. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Explores necessary aspects of describing a parasitic 
species for publication. 

655. Describe Species II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Explores necessary aspects of describing a parasitic 
species for publication 

g 690. Special Topics in Coastal Sciences. 1-6 hrs. May include lecture material, student presentations, and discussions 
g| moderated by instructor. May be repeated. 

g 69 1 . Research in Coastal Sciences. 1 - 1 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Pi 692. Special Problems in Coastal Sciences. 2-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. 

$3 697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit towards a degree. Students actively 
|fj working on a diesis, consulting with the major professor, or using otiier resources of the university may enroll in tiiis 

course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
8 on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 

least 3 hours each semester. 



Course Descriptions jj 249 



698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs for a total of 6 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

728. Crustacean Taxonomy. 2 hrs. Corequisite: COA 728L. Morphology, taxonomy, and sytematics of higher Crustacea 
emphasizing the major orders of die three Malacostracan subclasses. 

728L Crustacean Taxonomy Lab. 2 hrs. Corequisite: COA 728. Examination and comparison of homologous characters in 
representatives of the subclasses Phyllocarida, Hoplocanda, and Eumalacostraca. 

742. Topics in Fisheries Ecology. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Review of primary literature in fisheries 
ecology as defined by the topic chosen each semester. 

746. Ecology of Fishes. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. Topics range from reproduction to aspects of population 
and community ecology. Students complete six pre-proposals and lead discussions on topics in fish ecology. 

757. Application of Environmental and Coastal Zone Management. 6 hrs. This class is designed to teach students 
environmental and coastal zone management. 

762. Statistical Methods in Environmental Coastal Zone Management 3 hrs. Emphasizes relationship among probability 
and hypothesis testing. 

763. Grantsmanship in Environmental Coastal Zone Management 3 hrs. Designed to teach grants writing skill specific 
to environmental and coastal science proposals. Will allow students to experience issues in identifying/submitting 
funding opportunities. 

790. Special Topics in Coastal Sciences. 1-6 hrs. Special topics in coastal sciences. May include lecture material; student 
presentations and discussions moderated by instructor. May be repeated. 

791 . Research in Coastal Sciences. 1-1 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

792. Special Problems in Coastal Sciences. 2-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. 

797. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit towards a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Community Health Sciences (CHS) 

508. Health Education Methods. 3 hrs. A survey of teaching methods that are appropriate for health education program 
delivery. 

510. School Health Education Planning. 3 hrs. Diagnostic phases preceding program development, skills in planning, 
organization, and implementation of school health education programs. 

511. Health Education Curriculum Development 3 hrs. Coordination of curriculum development, content selection, and 

scope and sequence. 

512. Measurement and Evaluation in Health Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHS 509 or CHS 510. An introduction to 
measurement techniques and methods for evaluating health programs. 

514. Consumer Health. 3 hrs. The importance of consumer education as related to advertising theory and methods, health 
misconceptions, health services, medical quackery, and health products. 

515. School Health Program. 3 hrs. Organization and operation of school healdi programs with emphasis on instruction, 
environment, and services. 

522. Drugs and the Whole Person. 3 hrs. Psychosocial, medical, legal, and healdi aspects of drugs (including alcohol) and 
their abuse. 

530. Human Sexuality. 3 hrs. Physical, emotional, and social aspects of human sexuality. 

531. Sexuality Education. 3 hrs. Theory, methods, and materials for planning, organizing, and implementing sexuality in 
school and community settings. 

536. Stress Management Techniques. 3 hrs. Theory and application of primary prevention strategies in stress management 
programs. 

537. Health Education in Clinical Settings. 3 hrs. Analysis of the role, methods, and technology of health education 
pertaining to healdi care clinics and patient education. 

540. Introduction to Biostarisrics. 3 hrs. Introduction to basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistical methods in 
health sciences. 

578. Specialized Studies in Developmental Disabilities. 1-6 hrs. Specialized study and skill acquisition in the area of 
developmental disabilities. Topics vary. 



MM 



590. Special Topics. 1-3 hrs. 



250 |j Course Descriptions 



597. Professional Collaboration for Developmental Disability Services. 3 hrs. Study of the interdependent contributions of 
relevant disciplines in training, service, and research. 

598. Families of the Developmen tally Disabled. 3 hrs. Interdisciplinary approach to die study of families of the 
developmentally disabled. 

599. British Studies. 3-6 hrs. Involves variable topics. Lectures and supervised research in England. Offered exclusively 
through the Southern Miss Center for International and Continuing Education. 

601. Introduction to Community Health Practice. 3 hrs. An overview of the public health system, including mission, 
functions, infrastructure, and interventions and results. 

609. Community Health Education Planning. 3 hrs. Diagnostic phases preceding program development, skdls in planning, 
organization, and implementation of health education programs in the community. 

611. Internship in Community Health. 3-9 hrs. Supervised professional experience in a selected community health setting. 

620. Chronic Disease Epidemiology. 3 hrs. Concepts of methods of chronic disease epidemiology; epidemiological study 
design; prevention of control of chronic diseases. 

622. Epidemiology. 3 hrs. Basic concepts of the distribution and determinants of diseases and odier health conditions. Apply 
epidemiological methods in prevention and control of disease. 

623. Biostatistics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: One course in statistics. Concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential 
statistical methods in health sciences. 

625. Health Administration. 3 hrs. Application of management principles to health care organizations with a focus on 
governance and leadership, human resources, control systems, strategic planning, and accountability. 

626. Introduction to Health Systems. 3 hrs. Introduction to the American health care system and its component 
organizations. 

627. Health Policy. 3 hrs. Analysis of die role of federal and state institutions and other participants in health policy 
formulation, implementation, and evaluation. 

628. Assessment Procedures for Young Children with Disabilities. 3 hrs. To familiarize students with current issues, 
theories, and practices regarding the assessment of young children who are at risk for or have manifest disabilities. 

629. Advanced Intervention Procedures for Young Children with Disabilities. 3 hrs To familiarize students with 
current issues, tiieories, intervention methods, and procedures for young children who are at risk for or have manifest 
disabilities. 

638. Workplace Health Promotion. 3 hrs. Study of health education theory and practice as applied to occupational health. 

640. Traffic Systems Management 3 hrs. An overview of agencies and systems involved in the management of vehicular 
traffic. 

655. Environmental Health. 3 hrs. A study of the relationship between environmental conditions and human health 

656. Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health. 3 hrs. Social and behavior determinants of health, illness, and sick role. 

657. Health Care Accounting for Managers. 3 hrs. An introduction to the financial aspects of health care impacting program 
managers. Core topics include historical reimbursement systems, managed care, budgeting, analysis of financial 
statements and general financial principles. 

658. Occupational Health. 3 hrs. Study of workplace-related health problems, identification of contributing factors, and 
presentation methods. 

660. Long-Term Care Policy and Administration. 3 hrs. A study of policy and administrative issues affecting the elderly and 
disabled populations. 

665. Public Health Nutrition: Programs and Principles. 3 hrs. State, national, and international mechanisms of delivery of 
nutrition and health services; political and social issues in nutrition health policy formulation and implementation. 

666. Nutrition Program Planning and Evaluation. 3 hrs. Principles and procedures to plan, implement, and evaluate 
nutrition promotion/disease presentation programs. 

670. Health Law and Justice. 3 hrs. An examination of social and legal principles impacting health care delivery in the U.S. 

680. Research Techniques. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Graduate statistics course. Principles, evaluation, and types and techniques of 
research in health care. - 

685. Contemporary Issues in Health. 3 hrs. Comprehensive examination of a current health issue of contemporary 
importance. 

688. Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities. 3 hrs. Medical conditions, diagnostic tests, and other health care issues 
plpl relevant to individuals with developmental disabilities. 

lipl 691. Research. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of major instructor. 

§|1|| 692. Special Problems in Safety. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. 

«Li 697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with die major professor, or using odier resources of the university may enroll in tiiis 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 



Course Descriptions jj 251 



on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

710. Seminar. 3 hrs. Advanced topics in health administration. 

716. Health Economics. 3 hrs. Assist the student in developing a set of tools that can help them make economic-based 
administrative and policy decisions in a modem health care organization. 

720. Community Organization for Health Education. 3 hrs. Communities and community organizations as they relate to 
health services and health education. 

722. Infectious Disease Epidemiology. 3 hrs. This course will provide epidemiologic knowledge and skills required to 
diagnose common infectious diseases in humans, identify populations at risk, and apply measures to control the disease. 

723. Biostatistics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHS 623 Biostatistics or an equivalent course. This course will provide knowledge 
and skills for the application of advanced statistical methods for analysis and interpretation of data. 

727. Health Care Strategic Planning. 3 hrs. Students use strategic thinking and strategic planning to develop solutions to 
problems that health care organizations face today. 

737. Health Care Org Behavior and Human Resources. 3 hrs. Examines the behavioral, structural, legal, and human 
aspects of today's workforce in health care organizations. 

744. Behavioral Problems in Safety Programs. 3 hrs. A study of behavioral, attitudinal, and motivational issues in a variety 
of safety programs. 

746. Administration and Supervision of Safety Programs. 3 hrs. Administration and supervision of governmental, 
industrial, agency, and community safety programs. 

747. Health Care Marketing. 3 hrs. Examines marketing in health care organizations including: consumer orientation, 
healthcare marketing techniques, marketing research, information systems and planning. 

757. Health Care Financial Management. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CHS 657. Application of financial management principles to 
health care organizations for health care administrators. 

767. Cases Studies in Health Services Administration. 3 hrs. Capstone course for Executive Master of Public Health 
program. Exercises will require the use of knowledge gained in otiier MPH courses. 

785. Data Management and Analysis in Public Health. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CHS 623 or equivalent statistics. Apply 
knowledge of biostatistics and epidemiology in data analysis using SPSS. 

792. Special Problems in Health. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and director. 

Computational Science (COS) 

701. Visual Techniques. 3 hrs. Graphical and visual data manipulation, emphasizing the task of report and document 
generation with visual and graphical data for presentations and professional publications. 

702. Data Analysis Techniques. 3 hrs. Introduction to numerical data using analytical tools, e.g., signal processing for pre- 

anti post-processing data, and numerical and functional approximation for data analysis. 

703. Data Handling Techniques. 3hrs. Storing, receiving, and handling of digital data, including fundamental concepts, in 
using files and databases. 

730. Parallel Algorithms. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Knowledge of sequential algorithm design and analysis, NP-completeness, 
proficiency in high-level language programming, including pointer manipulation. Topics include models of parallel 
computation, general techniques, graph algorithms, expression evaluation, parallel sorting, parallel string matching, and 
P-completeness. 

740. Seminar 1. 1 hr. Study of current research techniques and results in scientific computing. Can be taken four times. The 
objective of this course is to acquaint students with techniques and applications of scientific computing. The students 
will study the literature in the field and hear presentations from practitioners in the field. Letter grades will be assigned 
on the basis of written or oral reports on assigned topics. 

781. Topics in Computational Sciences. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Covers topic of interest to students 
and faculty. 

791. Research in Computational Sciences. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of major professor. 

797. Independent Study and Research. Hours arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 

Computer Engineering Technology (CET) 

501. Microprocessor Architecture and Applications. 3 hrs. Corequisite: CET 50 1L. Microprocessor architecture and 
applications; I/O interfaces, memory organization. 

50 1L. Microprocessor Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CET 501. 



HUM 

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252 |j Course Descriptions 



520. Embedded Microcomputer Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CET 501. Corequisite: CET 520L. Embedded computer 
applications with microprocessor circuit design and commercial product development 

520L. Embedded Microcomputer Design Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CET 520. 

572. Advanced Programmable Logic Circuits. 3 hrs. Corequisite: CET 572L. Fundamentals and applications of 
synchronous and asynchronous design through the use of advanced VLSI programmable logic devices. 

572L. Programmable Logic Circuits Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CET 572. 

574. Switching Circuits. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The design and analysis of synchronous and 
asynchronous state machines and their implementation in PALs, GALs, FPGAs, and other switching circuits. 

577. Introduction to Control Systems Technology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites. CET 323 and EET 312. Corequisite: CET 577L. 
Fundamental control system theory and applications; servomechanisms; process control; controllers, measurements, and 
instrumentation. 

577L Introduction to Control Systems Technology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CET 577. 

578. Digital Control Systems. 2 hrs. Design of control systems incoqwrating a computer as an online element Design of 
control algorithms and introduction to optimal control. 

578L. Digital Control Systems Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: CET 578. 

592. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Supervised study in the area of computer engineering technology. 

620. Advanced Microcontroller Applications. 3 hrs. Course covers advanced real-time programming and interfacing 
techniques. Applications will emphasize sensor interface circuits/systems for data acquisition, positioning, and control. 
Project management will include written proposals, budgets, verbal presentation, and project demonstrations. 

672. Digital Systems III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CET 571 . Fault detection in digital systems and fault tolerant computing. 

687. Advanced VLSI Design. 4 hrs. Principles of CAD tools in design of digital VLSI systems: stick diagrams; design rules; 
and layout diagrams for CMOS technology. Design and implementation of custom VLSI integrated circuits. 

692. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Supervised study in the area of computer engineering technology. 

Computer Science (CSC) 

510. Operating Systems and Multiprocessing. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CSC 306, 306L, 308, MAT 420. Continuation of CSC 

306. Emphasis on intra-system communication. 

510L. Operating Systems and Multiprocessing Laboratory. 

511. Database Management Systems Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CSC 306, 307. Design and implementation of DBMS. 

Survey of research literature. 

512. Introduction to Artificial Intelligence. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 308. Concepts and techniques of intelligent systems. 
Survey of research literature. 

513. Algorithms. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 307. Design and analysis of algorithms. Complexity theory. 

514. Software Design and Development 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 307. Corequisite: CSC 514L. Formal development of 
software through team projects. 

514L. Software Design and Development Laboratory. 1 hr. A laboratory designed to support CSC 514. 

515. Theory of Programming Languages. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 308. Formal treatment of programming language 
translation and compiler design concepts. 

521. Relational Database Management Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 511. Theory of relational systems, comparison of 

relational and conventional systems, use of state-of-the-art relational systems such as Oracle. 

524. Software Engineering D. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 514. Programming languages and software design, modular/object 
oriented design, team programming, human factors, case studies. 

544. Robotic Systems: Theory, Development, and Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 326 or permission of instructor. 
Robotic system development, direct kinematics, the ami equation, workspace analysis, trajectory planning, and robotic 
«™p. programming methodologies. 

Ilpl 585. Information Retrieval in the U.K-Thcory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Design of British information 
|P3 processing systems. 

I|bs| 586. Information Retrieval in the U.K-Applications. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Design of information 
jjll processing systems. 

igj 592. Computer Science Problems 1. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Solution of problems germane to a selected area of study. 

616 Automata, Computability, and Formal Languages. 3 hrs Prerequisite: CSC 415. Formal models of computation. 
WkA Computability, complexity, languages. 



Course Descriptions | 253 



620. Formal Methods in Programming Languages. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 616. Data and control abstractions. 
Backtracking and nondetenninism. Functional and logic programming. Program specification and verification. 

623. Analytical Models for Computer Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 410. Examination of the major models that have 

been used to study operating systems and the computer systems which they manage. Petri nets, data flow diagrams, and 
other models of parallel behavior. Fundamentals of queuing theory. 

624. Computer Communication Networks and Distributed Processing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 623. Study of networks 

of interacting computers. Problems, rationales, and possible solutions for both distributed processing and distributed 
databases. Major national and international communication protocols will be presented. 

625. Computer Graphics. 3 hrs. Architecture of display systems, basic 2-D and 3-D mathematics, 3-D viewing and geometry, 

advanced surface mathematics, advanced architectures for raster and vector displays, hidden line and hidden surface 
problems, realistic imaging, software design for 3-D systems. 

626. Advanced Computer Architecture. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 410. Introduction to various architectures and techniques 
which have been developed or are proposed in the literature. Pipelined architecture, dynamic system architecture, data 
flow architecture, array processing. 

629. Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory. 3 hrs Prerequisite: CSC 616. Study of combinatorial and graphical 
techniques for complexity analysis including generating functions, recurrence relations, Polya's theory of counting, and 
MP complete problems. 

630. Parallel Programming Techniques. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CSC 306 and good knowledge of C and Unix. An application 

oriented course which will use a hands-on approach to teach methods for programming parallel applications on single 
and multi-cpu machines. 

632. Artificial Intelligence. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CSC 412. Relatively unfocused, relatively focused. Heuristic, and 
probabilistic reasoning. Production rule systems. Knowledge-based and expert systems. Survey of current research. 

633. Distributed Database Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 623. A consideration of die problems and opportunities inherent 

in distributed databases on a network computer system. Includes file allocation, directory systems, mutual exclusion, 
deadlock detection and prevention, synchronization, query optimization, and fault tolerance. 

634. Information Storage and Access. 3 hrs. Prerequisites. CSC 41 1. Advanced data structures, file structures, and databases, 

witii an emphasis on specialized problem areas. Access and maintenance issues. 

636. Modeling and Simulation. 3 hrs. A study of the construction of models which sunulate real systems. Includes probability 
and distribution theory, statistical estimation and inference, the use of random variates, and validation procedures. A 
simulation language is used for the solution of typical problems. 

638. Advanced Computer Algorithms. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 413. Study of recent advances in algorithm design and 
analysis. 

640. Mathematical Programming. 3 hrs. Linear programming. Modeling, simplex method and modification, duality. 
Networks and integer programming algorithms. 

644. Advanced Robotic Systems. 3 hrs. To introduce students to advanced topics and prospective research areas in the field 

of robotics and its relation to Al world modeling, and simulation. 

645. Expert Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSC 632. Review of classical expert systems. Study of knowledge representation, 

acquisition and epistemology to formulate rule-based systems. Study of inference engines using statistics, Bayes' 
Theorem, Heuristic Techniques. 

690 Seminar in Computer Science. 1 hr. 

691. Topics in Computer Science. 3 hrs. Special topics in computer science of current interest to faculty and students, e.g., 
robotics, neural networks, pattern recognition. May be repeated for credit at discretion of academic adviser. 

695. Directed Study. 1-3 hrs. Individual stud)- by a student on an area or problem approved by the student's academic adviser. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a diesis, consulting with die major professor, or using odier resources of the university may enroll in tliis 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of diesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1 -6 his. for a total of 6 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed. 

699. Project. 1-3 hrs. for a total of 3 hrs. 

726. Advanced Computer Architecture. 3 hrs. Single stream control, object-oriented processing, single 1 -stream 
parallelism, parallelism by message passing, shared resource systems, performance tuning for computationally 
intensive kernels. 

730. Parallel and Distributed Computing. 3 hrs. Fundamental concepts, techniques, and tools of parallel computer 
architectures, parallel algorithm design, performance and scalability, MPI and open MP programming, matrix 
computation, and solving linear system. Introduction to distributed computing. 



sm 

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II 



254 ]j Course Descriptions 



733. Advanced Distribution Database Systems. 3 hrs. Advanced concept for modeling, designing, querying, and managing 
large databases, distributed databases, data warehousing and mining. 

738. Advanced Algorithms- 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Knowledge of sequential algorithm design and analysis, NP-completeness, 
proficiency in high level language programming including pointer manipulation. Topics include models of parallel 
computation, general techniques, graph algorithms, expression evaluation, parallel sorting, parallel string matching, and 
P-completeness. 

74 1 . Machine Vision. 3 hrs. Advanced introduction to algorithms and systems for machine vision. 

742. Computational Geometric Modeling. 3 lirs. Data structures and algorithms used in 2D and 3D computational/discrete 

geometry transforming several real-world into purely geometric ones and then solve them using modem computational 
geometry algorithms. Real-world problems will include robotics, graphics, and CAD/CAM. 

Computer Science (CS) 

(Offered only at Gulf Coast) 

506. Operating Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CS 303 and CS 307. An in-depth study of operating systems. 

508. Programming Languages. 3 his. Prerequisite: CS 307. Formal study of programming languages, organization of 
programming languages, runtime behavior of programs, interpretative languages, lexical analysis, and parsing. 

511. Relational Database Management Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 307. Introduction to RDBMSs. Includes database 

design using the entity relationship model, relational model theory, relational algebra, and the implementation of 
applications using SQL and a state-of-the-art relational system such as Oracle. 

512. Principles of Artificial Intelligence. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 307. Computer representation of knowledge, problem- 

solving, automated deductive systems, computer learning, computer implementation of AI problems, expert systems. 

514. Software Engineering 1. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 307. Overview of software developments, projects management, 
programming style, testing, debugging, and other topics. 

521. Advanced Topics in Relational Database Management Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 5 1 1 . A selection of advanced 
topics representing current trends in RDBMSs. Topics include, but are not restricted to, concurrency, backup and 
recovery, embedded database calls, distributed RDBMSs, and object oriented RDBMSs. 

524. Software Engineering n. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 414/514. Programming languages and software design, modular/object 

oriented design, team programming, human factors, case studies. 

525. Computer Graphics Design. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 307. Theory, design, and use of computer grapliic systems. 

585. Information Retrieval in the U.K.-Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CSS 342 and permission of instructor. A study of 

British information processing systems. 

586. Information Processing in the U.K.-AppIications. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CS 485 and permission of instructor. Design of 

information processing systems. 

592. Computer Science Problems 1. 3 hrs. Solution of problems germane to a select area of study. 

611. Artificial Neural Networks. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 307. An in-depth study of the major neural network models. 

Emphasis is placed on architecture, implementation and applications. Students will use existing neural net software to 
design, implement, and test applications. Students will also test and implement a back propagation neural net 

616. Automata, Coniputability, and Formal Languages. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: CS 415 and formal models of computation, 
computability, complexity, and languages. 

625. Computer Graphics. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: MAT 168 and CS 525. Hardware, software used in computer graphics; 

refresh, storage, and raster scan hardware; two-dimensional transformations, clipping, windowing, display files, and 
input devices. 

626. Advanced Computer Architecture. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CS 303, CET370. Introduction to various architectures 

and techniques that have been developed or are proposed in die literature. Pipelined architecture, dynamic system 
architecture, data flow architecture, and array processing. 

632. Artificial Intelligence. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 412/512. Computer representation of knowledge, problem solving, 
automated deductive systems, computer learning, computer implementation of AI problems and expert systems. 

636. Statistical Simulation and Modeling. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CS 307, CSS 515. Formulation of models and the design of 
simulation programs. Simulation languages such as GPSS, SIMSSCRIPT II.5 and NDTRAN. 

638. Information Structures. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 307. Analysis of algorithms, recurrence relations, directed and 
undirected graphs, application of techniques to analysis of algoritiims in graph theory, and sorting and searching. 

640. Mathematical Programming 1. 3 his. Prerequisites: CS 320, MAT 326. Linear, nonlinear, integer, and dynamic 



1 

programming. Use of PERT-CPM in project scheduling. 



Course Descriptions | 255 



650. Computer Networks. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CS 406/506 or permission of instructor. An in-depth study of local area/ 
metropolitan and local haul networks including their use, topology, design, and various network protocols. 

690. Seminar in Computer Science. 1 hr. 

691. Topics in Computer Science. 3 hrs. Special topics in computer science of current interest to faculty and students, e.g., 

robotics, neural networks, and pattern recognition. May be repeated for credit at discretion of academic adviser. 

695. Directed Study. 1-3 hrs. Individual study by a student on an area or problem approved by the student's academic adviser. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1 -9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 

working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and who are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this 
course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed. 

699. Project 3 hrs. 

Computer Science and Statistics (CSS) 

500 Introduction to Computer Education. 3 hrs. Introduction to concepts, techniques, materials, and resources for teaching 
computer science concepts, problem solving and programming relative to computer literacy. Research and presentations 
related to computer science education. 

501. Computer Skills for Research. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 240. Editing of data files, computer system utilization, use of 
BMD, SPSS, MINITAB for processing research data. Cannot be used to satisfy Computer/Computational Science MS. 
requirements. 

502. Structured Basic Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 500. Technical presentation of BASIC with scientific problem 

solving, algorithms and introduction to data structures. Cannot be used to satisfy Computer/Computational Science M.S. 
requirements. 

503. Authoring Systems for Computer-based Learning. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 500. Developing computer-based 
instructional modules utilizing the authoring system approach. Cannot be used to satisfy Computer/Computational 
Science M.S. requirements. 

504. Internet Concepts. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Basic computer literacy. Introduction to the information superhighway via the 
Internet. Cannot be used to satisfy Computer/Computational Science M.S. requirements. 

505. Advanced Internet: CGI Programming. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Knowledge of the Internet, basic HTML, some high-level 

programming language. Basic review of WWW and HTML, forms and fonns processing, CGI programming, Java 
programming, VRML, security, and privacy issues. 

515. Methods of Mathematical Statistics I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 168. Continuous and discrete distribution, t-test, Chi- 
square test, and analysis of variance. 

516. Methods of Mathematical Statistics II. .3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 515. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts, multi-way 
classification anova, simple and multiple linear regression, polynomial regression. 

518. Sampling Methods. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 515. The planning, execution and evaluation of sample surveys. Simple 
random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling. 

525. Virtual Reality. 3 hrs. Comprehensive study of virtual reality techniques. 

560. Unix System and Network Administration. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 360. An introduction to implementing gateway 
services, firewalling, and providing simple network services. Survey of other implementation of the Linux Operating 
system. 

630. Communications Engineering Fundamentals. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Basic concepts of 
components and systems that provide electrical communications. Does not apply to Computer Science degree. 

631. Analog and Digital Communications. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 630. Principles and techniques of analog and digital 
communications. Fourier analysis of various modulation and multiplexing methods. Does not apply to Computer 
Science degree. 

632. Communication Systems Analysis. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 631. Principles and techniques for analyzing the technical 
performance of voice and data communication systems. Does not apply to Computer Science degree. 

633. The Computer and Communications. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 632. The operation of and uses for digital computers in 
a communications context. Does not apply to Computer Science degree. 

636. Stochastic Processes and Queuing Theory. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: MAT 385. Poisson process, Markov processes, and 
Queuing dieory 

637. Least Squares Techniques. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CSS 516. Regression analysis, curvilinear regression, discriminant and 
factor analysis. 



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256 |j Course Descriptions 






Construction Engineering Technology (BCT) 

502. Innovation in Construction Management 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Study the historical 
development of and possible fiiture. 

507. Advanced Construction Equipment 3 hrs. Methods of specification, selection, and charge rate development for 

construction heavy equipment 

508. Route Surveying. 2 hrs. Prerequisite. BCT 205. Corequisite: BCT 508L. Principles for the design and layout of routes. 
Coverage includes horizontal and vertical alignment, route location, earthwork, computation, ground photogrammetric 
survey methods, and special survey mediods for highways, pipelines, transmission lines, and urban construction. 

508L. Route Surveying Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite: BCT 508. 

509. Boundary Surveying. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 205. Corequisite: BCT 509L. The application of knowledge of die 
science of surveying measurement, the legal principles of boundary location, the laws related to boundaries and land 
use, die land planning and development concepts pertinent to subdivision of land and property surveys. 

509L, Boundary Surveying Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BCT 509. 

544. Building Structures. 3 hrs. Design of reinforced concrete structural members and systems. Concrete formwork design 
and cost analysis. 

545. Soils and Foundations. 2 hrs. Theory and application of soil mechanics to foundation design and construction. 
545L Soils and Foundations Laboratory. 1 hr 

546. Hydraulics and Surface Drainage. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 544. Corequisite: BCT 546L. Hydraulic analysis and 
design of urban, highway, airport, and watershed drainage problems; discussion of overload and drainage channel 
flows; hydraulics of storm-drain systems and culverts; determination of design flow of runoff from drainage from 
highways, airports, and urban areas; design of drainage gutters, channels, sewer networks, and culverts. 

546L. Hydraulics and Surface Drainage Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BCT 546. 

554. Estimating. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BCT 554L. Material quantity survey techniques 
used in estimating costs of construction. 

554L Estimating I Laboratory- 1 hr. Corequisite: BCT 554. 

555. Estimating II. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 554. Corequisite: BCT 555L. Determination of construction cost, bidding 
procedures, and analysis of job cost data. 

555L. Estimating II Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BCT 555. 

556. Highway Estimating. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 554. Corequisite: BCT 556L. Determination of highway construction 
costs, bidding procedures, and analysis of job cost data. 

556L Highway Estimating Lab. 1 hr. Corequisite: BCT 556. 

558. Construction Planning and Scheduling. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: BCT 558L. Critical 

Path Method (CPM) as a project planning, scheduling, and monitoring technique. 
558L. Construction Planning and Scheduling Laboratory. 1 hr Corequisite: BCT 558 

576. Construction Labor. 3 hrs. A study of construction labor resources, labor history, and governmental labor regulations. 

577. Construction Project Management 3 hrs. Duties and responsibilities of a construction manager. Services provided 
by CM firms. 

578. Applications of Construction Law. 3 hrs. Analysis of construction law and the construction process; legal problems in 
the bidding process and in the performance of the contract. 

580. Construction Safety. 3 hrs. Development and management of accident prevention programs in construction. 

586. Project Controls. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: BCT 555. Corequisite: BCT 586L. Determination of highway construction costs, 

bidding procedures, and analysis of job cost data. 
586L. Project Controls Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: BCT 586. 

592. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of faculty adviser. 
602. Construction It Solutions. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Analysis of information technology; Software 

and hardware application to construction problems. 
636. Advanced Construction Systems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Innovative systems and protocols that 

enhance the construction process for reductions in construction cycle time and cost, and the integration and automation 

of project and site metrological information into project information management systems for enhanced project 

performance. 
659. Advanced Scheduling. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Implement the latest method and technology for 

scheduling construction projects. 

678. Construction Risk Management 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Risk and uncertainty in construction and 

dieir impact on management decisions in construction. 

679. International Construction Management 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of professor. Organizational, management, 

cultural, and legal issues involved in international construction management. 



Course Descriptions | 257 



686. Cost Engineering and Accounting. 3 hrs. Methods of monitoring and reporting the financial status of projects and 

organizations. 
692. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. 
696. Construction Internship. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate program and completion of at least 9 hours of 

graduate credit 

Cooperative Education (CED) 

+500 Cooperative Education Work Term. hr. 

Counseling Personnel Services (CPS) 

610. Foundations, Organization, and Administration of Guidance. 3 hrs. An introduction to counseling and guidance 

services at the elementary/secondary school levels. Attention is given to both the range of services typically offered and 
to principles for organizing and aidrninistering a program of guidance services. 

611. Career Development and Information Services. 3 hrs. The introduction to theories of career development and an 

analysis of the world of work. Processes are identified through which occupational/educational and personal/social 
information may be integrated for career/life planning. 

612. Counseling Theory and Practice. 3 hrs. Emphasizes theories and principles undergirding the practical application of 

various helping techniques. 

61 5. The American College Student 3 hrs. An overview of the American college student, including historical background., 

demography, societal, influences, issues, and trends. 

616. Individual Analysis & Group Counseling for School Counselors. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: REF 602 or equivalent and 

instructor permission The fundamental principles of psychological assessment including concepts necessary for the 
administration, scoring, interpretation, and use of test results. Attention is also given to ethics and issues involved in the 
appropriate use of psychological test results. 

617. Pre-Counseling Lab. 3 hrs. Seeks to develop the microskills which are foundational to helping relationships. 

618. Group Processes. 3 hrs. Introduction to theory and practice of group counseling and psychodierapy Requires 

participation in experimental quasi-group. Major theoretical models for group work are surveyed. 

619. Cultural Diversity in Counseling and Personnel Services. 3 hrs. A theoretical and skill development course for Student 

Affairs professionals designed to strengthen multicultural awareness, knowledge, and skills of diverse populations in 

the higher education setting. 
639. Theory and Practice of Student Affairs. 3 hrs. An introduction to student development services in liigher education. 
651. School Counseling Field Practicum. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CPS 610, 612, 617. Abasic counseling field practicum for 

school counselors. 

653. Comprehensive Field Practicum for School Counselors. 3-12 hrs. Prerequisites: CPS 617, 65 1 . A field practicum for 

students enrolled in die Counseling and Personnel Services program. Students may repeat for a maximum of 9 hours 
credit. 

654. College Student Personnel Practicum. 3 hrs A basic field practicum for college student personnel specialists 

71 1. Theory and Practice of Consultation. 3 hrs. Introduction to tiieory and process of consultation. Emphasis is placed on 
student aquisition of basic consulting skills/competencies. 

739. Current Issues and Trends in Student Affairs. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CPS 639 or permission of instructor. A topical study 

of current issues and trends in the design of student development services in liigher education. 

740. Legal and Ethical Issues to Student Affairs. 3 hrs. This course will serve as an introduction to the legal and ethical 

aspects of the student affairs profession for the entry to director level professional. 
743. Student Development Theory and Research. 3 hrs. A basic course in college student development theory and research. 

Curriculum and Instruction: Elementary (CIE) 

503. Kindergarten-Primary Education. 3 hrs. A practicum designed to give teaching experiences in understanding the 
social, emotional, and cognitive growth and development of children. 

540. Supervision for Effective Student Teaching. 1 hr. Introduction to The University of Soutiiem Mississippi's student 
teaching program and the roles' and resporisibdities of associated personnel. 

542. Computational Errors in Elementary Mathematics. 1 hr. The identification and remediation of pupd errors in addition, 
subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers. 

578. Specialized Studies in Developmental Disabilities. 1-6 hrs. Specialized study and skill acquisition in the area of 
developmental disabilities. Topics vary. 

594. Learning Resources in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. Students will become acquainted with learning sources, selection, 
use, and production of multimedia materials for kindergarten and primary education 



258 | Course Descriptions 



595. British Studies in Early Childhood Education. 1-6 hrs. Compares and contrasts die philosophies and current trends of 
American and British early childhood education. 

598. Families of the Developmen tally Disabled. 3 hrs. Interdisciplinary approach to die study of families of the 
developmentally disabled. 

599. British Studies: Studies in British Education. 1-6 hrs. Lectures dealing with education in British education. 

600. Foundations of Multicultural Education. 3 hrs. Examines the affective and theoretical dimensions of pedagogy 

appropriate for culturally and linguistically diverse students, with emphases on research, current social and 
educational issues, and strategies for teaching tolerance. 

602. Procedural Errors in Mathematics. 3 hrs. The identification and remediation of procedural errors in die basic 
operations of elementary school arithmetic. 

605. The Process of National Board Teacher Certification. 3-6 hrs. Provides opportunities to analyze and apply National 
Board for Professional Teaching standards m the student's content area using the reflective process. Three hours may be 
taken at the pre-candidate level or three hours may be taken at die candidate level. 

606. Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary Grades. 3 lirs. The basic concepts of language teaching and learning with 

consideration of aU die language arts and tiieir interrelationships. 

615. Student Discipline Techniques and Procedures for Teachers and Administrators. 3 hrs. Provides a comprehensive 
overview of strategies for disciplining students. 

616. Teacher/Administrator Legal Rights and Responsibilities 3 hrs. Provides a comprehensive overview of the legal 
rights and responsibilities of teachers and administrators. 

678. Assessment and Intervention for Handicapped Children 0-5. 3 lirs. Current issues and theories regarding assessment 
and intervention procedures for at-risk and handicapped young children, birth through 5. 

688. Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities. 3 hrs. Medical conditions, diagnostic tests, and other health care issues 
relevant to individuals with developmental disabilities. 

692. Special Problems I, II, III. 1 hr. each. A problem study to be approved by the department chairman to develop 
knowledge and facility in a field of interest of die student Preparation of a scholarly paper is required. 

694. Field Problems in Production I, II, III. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of die department chairman. This course provides 
students with an opportunity to study local school problems in a field setting under the supervision of a graduate 
professor. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting witii die major professor, or using other resources of die university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 3 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed. 

704. Multicultural Education: Curriculum Development and Pedagogy. 3 hrs Prerequisite CIE/S 600 or permission 
of instructor. Evaluates existing curricular materials and pedagogical practices against guidelines for teaching culturally 
and linguistically diverse students, with emphases on making adaptations in curricular materials, using appropriate 
assessment, effective teaching strategies, and relevant research. 

717. Professional Relationship in Improved Elementary Programs. 3 hrs. A course designed to investigate behavioral 
factors and individuals and groups as they affect elementary school environments. 

720. Internship in Reading: Public School. 3-6 hrs. The student is assigned to a public school in a teaching or supervisory 
capacity under the direct supervision of a reading faculty member in order to develop competency in instruction, 
administration, or clinical skills. 

724. Elementary Mathematics Methods. 3 hrs. Advanced theory and practices related to the teaching of mathematics; an 
investigation and analysis of the elementary curriculum based on NCTM standards. 

725. Social Studies Education in Elementary School. 3 hrs. A course which deals with programs, practices, trends, and 
pg, investigation of criteria for evaluating, planning, organizing, and improving social studies programs. 

gpl 726. The Development of the Latin Countries. 3 hrs. A seminar which deals with the historical, political, social, and 
jp| economic development of the Latin American region. 

fe 727. Diagnostic Techniques in Elementary Mathematics. 3 hrs. Varied data sources that serve the diagnostic teaching cycle 
j|| are investigated. 

S 728. Curriculum in the Elementary School. 3 hrs. A course involving analysis and evaluation of curriculum elements and 
procedures in terms of the implications for the individual, the school, and the community. A major paper on a curriculum 
|p§ topic is required. 

Ill 730. Practicum in Elementary Mathematics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CIE 724, or permission of the instructor. Provides 
LJ experience in the diagnosis and developmental instruction of elementary pupds and explores related materials. 



Course Descriptions | 259 



753. Instructional Management 3 hrs. Designed to help school districts develop and manage their educational program 
through clear instructional objectives and matching test items. 

756. Developing Community Education. 3 hrs. A course designed to acquaint teachers with the concept of community 
education and its impact on their role in the classroom through strengthening community ties. 

762. Research in Elementary Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate status or permission of chair of department. 
Designed to familiarize the student with the elements and methods of research, with the representative types of research, 
and with the major contributions of research to the field of elementary education. 

768. Children's Literature for the Early Years. 3 lirs. Principles and practices relative to literature in early childhood 
education with emphasis on methods of integration into the curriculum. 

770. Practicum in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. Curriculum planning, administration, and supervision are stressed 
through research and practice in laboratory settings. 

772. Practicum with Parents. 3 hrs. Parent-teacher-child intrapersonal and interpersonal relationships are investigated 
tlirough research and practice in laboratory settings. 

776. Seminar in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. Emphasis is on early childhood practice, theory, and research and their 

relatedness to psychological, sociological, and intellectual patterns. 

777. Evaluation in Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. .An introduction to specific principles and practices relative to group 

and individual evaluation procedures for early childhood education. 

778. Creative and Mental Growth. 3 hrs. Research in creative thinking and its relationship to mental growth is emphasized. 

780. Research in Child Development. 3 hrs. A course concerning methods and research in child growth in social, emotional, 
psychological, and physiological development 

782. History and Philosophy of Early Childhood Education. 3 hrs. An investigation of Pestaloza, Froebel, Montesson, and 
others representing philosophies influencing today's curricula and programs. 

790. Qualitative Research in Curriculum and Instruction. 3-6 hrs. Application of Qualitative Research Methodology in the 

context of investigations in curriculum and instruction. 

791. Research in Elementary Education. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of major professor. 

792. Special Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair. Provides the opportunity to pursue a special 
topic or area of interest 

794. Field Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of department chair. This course provides students with an opportunity to 
study local school problems in a field setting under the supervision of a graduate professor. 

797. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

798. Specialist Thesis. 6 hrs. Specialist's degree candidates are required to select a significant educational problem for 
investigation and to present the findings m a scholarly report under the guidance of a graduate committee. 

862. Seminar in Elementary Education. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate status or permission of die chair of the 
department. A course which is interdisciplinaiy in nature and focuses on contributions of research, philosophy, history, 
sociology, and educational psychology as they apply to the resolution of major issues in elementary education. 

880. Advanced Graduate Seminar in Education. 1 hr. A series of in-depth discussions and analysis of significant 
educational problems and issues for students in advanced programs. 

898. Dissertation. 12 his. 

Curriculum and Instruction: Reading (CIR) 

512. Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disability for the Classroom Teacher 3 hrs Prerequisites: CIE 306, CIE 309. 
Provides relevant practicum experiences in evaluation and gives extended opportunities in child tutoring appropriate to 
grades 2-8. 

54 1 . Foundations of Reading Instruction for the Adult. 3 hrs. This course involves an examination of the basis of reading 

instruction for the nonliterate adult 

. 
591. The Reading Conference. 3 hrs. An intensive program consisting of lectures, group discussion, and demonstration 
lessons. Only three hours may be used for degree purposes. 

622. Supervision and Curriculum in Reading. 3 hrs. The role of reading supervisors and school administrators in developing 
and implementing programs for improvement of reading instruction in schools. 

691. Research in Literacy. 1-16 hrs. Analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of literacy research as it relates to the unit and die 
program conceptual framework. 



260 I Course Descriptions 



705. Components of the Reading and Writing Process. 3 hrs. A study of phonemic awareness, word identification, 
vocabulary and background knowledge, fluency, comprehension, and motivation and their integration in fluent reading 
and writing. 

706. Foundations of the Literacy Process. 3 hrs. A study of the psychological, sociological, and bnguistic foundations of the 
reading and writing processes and variations related to cultural and bnguistic diversity. 

713. Literacy Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation. 3 hrs. A comparison, interpretation and appbcation of a wide range of 
formal and informal bteracy assessment tools and practices. 

715 Advanced Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disability for the Reading Specialist 3 hrs. Prerequisite: CIE 706. 
Deals with the role of die reading specialist, reading cbnic organization, diagnostic remedial materials and techniques, 
with limited testing-teaching and clinical observation experiences. 

721. Reading Specialist/Literacy Coaching Practicum L 3 hrs. A field experience for the reading speciahst/hteracy coach, 
linking assessment, differentiated instruction and effect on student learning. 

728. Curriculum Design for a Literate Environment 3 hrs. Assessment, development, and dehvery of an eifective student- 
centered bteracy curriculum. 

729 Comprehensive Instruction for Literacy Development 3 hrs. Application of research to effective lesson planmng, with 
emphasis on linking assessment, methods, materials, instruction, and interventions for hteracy development in K-8. 

730 Reading and Study Improvement Techniques for the Junior and Senior College Teacher of Reading. 3 hrs. 
Summarizes research, methods, and techniques of college reading programs. 

733. Comprehensive Assessment for Literacy Development 3 lirs. The use of a variety of assessment tools and practices to 
plan effective literacy instruction and evaluate student learning in a clinical setting. 

736. Reading Specialist/Literacy Coaching Practicum IL 3 hrs. A field experience for the reading speciahst/literacy coach 
supporting classroom teachers in reaserch-based literacy principles and practices for diverse learners. 

737. Practicum in Remedial Reading Instruction. 3 hrs. Provides the student experiences in secondary reading diagnosis 
and remediation, with emphasis on techniques in a practicum setting. 

754. Adolescent Literacy in the Content Areas. 3 hrs. Appbcation of research to lesson planning, with emphasis on linking 
assessment, methods, materials, instruction, and interventions for adolescent bteray in the content areas. 

785. Seminar in Reading Instruction. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CIE 705, CIE 706, CIE 729. Considers topics pertinent to current 
research in reading instruction. Topics announced in advance of registration. 

Curriculum and Instruction: Secondary (CIS) 

540 Supervision for Effective Student Teaching. 1 hr. Introduction to The University of Southern Mississippi's student 
teaching program and the roles and responsibilities of associated personnel. 

542. Methods and Materials for Teaching Adults to Read. 3 hrs. Instructional and diagnostic materials and methods for 
dealing with functionally illiterate adults. 

570. Curriculum in the Secondary School. 2 hrs. A course which examines the present-day structure and nature of the 
secondary school curriculum. 

578 Specialized Studies in Developmental Disabilities. 1-6 hrs. Specialized study and skill acquisition in the area of 
developmental disabilities. Topics vary. 

598. Families of the Dcvelopmentally Disabled. 3 hrs. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of families of the 
developmentally disabled. 

599. British Studies: Studies in British Education. 1-3 hrs. 

600. Foundations of Multicultural Education. 3 hrs. Examines the affective and theoretical dimensions of pedagogy 
appropriate for culturally and linguistically diverse students, with emphases on research, current social, and educational 
issues, and strategies for teaching tolerance. 

603. Management and Organization of Diverse Classrooms. 3 hrs Develops knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for 
teaching students from diverse backgrounds, emphasizing classroom management, organization, and discipline. 

605. The Process of National Board Teacher Certification. 3-6 hrs. Provides opportunities to analyze and apply National 
Board for Professional Teaching Standards in the student's content area using die reflective process. Three hours may be 
taken at die pre-candidate level or diree hours may be taken at die candidate level. 

615 Student Discipline Techniques and Procedures for Teachers and Administrators. 3 hrs. Provides a comprehensive 
overview of strategies for disciplining students. 

3 616. Teacher/Administrator Legal Rights and Responsibilities. 3 hrs. Provides a comprehensive overview of the legal 
3 rights and responsibibties for teachers and administrators. 

9 688. Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities. 3 hrs. Medical conditions, diagnostic tests, and other health care issues 
m relevant to individuals with developmental disabilities. 



Course Descriptions J 261 



692. Special Problems I, II, III. 1 hr. each. A problem study to be approved by the department chair to develop knowledge 
and facility in the field of interest of the student. Preparation of a scholarly paper is required. 

694. Field Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of die department chair. This course provides students with an opportunity 
to study local school problems in a field setting under the supervision of a graduate professor. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll m this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of die university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 3 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed 

700. Seminar in Secondary Education. 3 hrs. An investigation of the major trends and objectives of the secondary school, 
with emphasis upon the disciplinary areas of the curriculum. 

701. Algebra for Secondary Teachers. 3 hrs. Consideration is given to the problems relating to the teaching of algebra and a 

new review of special algebraic principles. 

705. Professional Subject Matter in Mathematics. 3 hrs. A study of ways to ennch the teaching of high school matiiematics 

through the introduction of basic topics and concepts of college mathematics. 

706. Geometry for Secondary Teachers. 3 hrs. Consideration is given to the problems pertaining to the teaching of high 
school geometry and a review of special geometric principles. 

707. Materials in the Teaching of Mathematics. 3 hrs. A study of materials to be used in the teaching of secondary school 
mathematics, both in die classroom and in extracurricular activities. 

708. High School Curriculum. 3 hrs. An overview of die field of curriculum and instruction at the secondary-school level 
with special emphasis upon contemporary trends 

710. Mathematics for Junior High School Teachers. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: To be teaching junior high school mathematics 
or have at least a minor in college mathematics. Consideration is given to the problems relative to the teaching of 
matiiematics in grades 7, 8, and 9 and to die organization of matiiematical subject matter for tiiese grades. 

718. Research and Trends in English Education. 3 hrs. Uses an action research paradigm to explore current research and 
trends m die English classroom from various theoretical perspectives. 

723. Research and Problems in Mathematics Education. 3 hrs. A seminar for experienced teachers who wish to plan 
developmental programs of mathematics instruction in tight of recent developments. 

750 Advanced Study of Problems and Issues in Teaching Secondary School Social Studies. 3 hrs Explores inquiry 
strategies for die social studies classroom and seeks to foster a firm understanding of basic analytical concepts and 
principles for the experienced social studies teacher. 

753. Instructional Management 3 hrs. Designed to help school districts develop and manage their educational program 
through clear instructional objectives and matching test items. 

756. Developing Community Education. 3 hrs. A course designed to acquaint teachers with the concept of community 
education and its impact on tiieir role in die classroom dirough strengthening community ties. 

790. Qualitative Research in Curriculum and Instruction. 3-6 hrs. Application of qualitative research methodology in the 

contexts of investigations in curriculum and instruction. 

791. Research in Secondary Education. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of the major professor. 

792. Special Problems. 3 hrs. 

794. Field Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite. Approval of department chair. This course provides students with an opportunity to 
study local school problems in a field setting under the supervision of a graduate professor. 

797. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

798. Specialist Thesis. 6 hrs. Specialist's degree candidates. are required to select a significant educational problem for 
investigation and to present the findings in a scholarly paper under the guidance of a graduate committee. 

880. Advanced Graduate Seminar in Education. 1 hr. A series of in-depth discussions and analysis of significant 
educational problems and issues for students in advanced programs. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 



ili 






262 | Course Descriptions 



Curriculum, Instruction, and Special Education (CISE) 



800 



802 



807 



809 



Critical Review of Professional Literature. 3 hrs. Doctoral seminar focusing on the review of current literature in 
elementary, secondary', and special education. 

Doctoral Seminar: Curriculum Theory. 3 hrs. Interpretive, normative, and critical perspectives of educational history, 
philosophy, sociology, and psychology. Understand and analyze theory for implementation in practice. 
Problems in Educational Research: Design L 3 hrs. Doctoral seminar focusing on research methods. Primary 
emphasis is placed on the review, development, and evaluation of research topics in the student's area of specialization. 
Problems in Educational Research: Design II. 3 hrs. Doctoral seminar focusing on research methods. Primary 
emphasis is placed on die review, development, and evaluation of research topics in the student's area of specialization. 
Seminar in Teacher Education. 3 hrs. Doctoral seminar focusing on exploration of issues and problems in education. 
Addresses development of programs, courses of study, and modules in higher education. 

Grant Writing, Policy Analysis, and Program Evaluation. 3 hrs. Doctoral seminar focusing on grant writing, policy 
analysis, and program evaluation in elementary, secondary, and special education. 



Dance (DAN) 

504. Advanced Jazz Dance. 2 hrs. The study and application of the principles of jazz movement. May be repeated for a total 
of 6 hours. 

509. Practicum in Movement 1-2 his. May be taken for a total of 9 his. 

580. Musical Theatre Dance. 2 hrs 

599. British Studies. 3-6 lus. Studies in dance and movement sciences abroad (5 weeks). 



Economic Development (ED) 



551. Theories of Economic Location. 3 lirs. Principals of economic location analysis with emphasis on locational decision 
making and investment by different types of businesses. Relevance to economic development is stressed. 

646. Economic Development Marketing. 1 lir. Examines the principles of strategic comprehensive marketing as applied to 
economic development practice. 

656. Rural Economic Development 3 hrs. Focuses on rural development problems with emphasis on the southeastern U.S.; 
examines national and state policies and practices for stimulating nonmetropolitan development. 

662. Economic Development and the Environment 2 hrs. Focuses on environmental issues and practices in economic 
development. Includes a study of sustainable development, wedands, resource conservation, hazardous and solid waste, 
environmental impact statements, and pennitting. 

665. Economic Development and Tourism. 2 hrs. Study of tourism as it relates to economic development. Focuses on 
methods for attracting tourism, hospitality, and gaming businesses as target sectors for economic development. Includes 
a study of ecotourism and the gaming industry. 

667. Community Development II. 3 hrs. Examines applied techniques for implementing a community economic 
development plan, including downtown development, industrial sites and buildings, workforce development, and 
infrastructure. 

691 . Internship. 2 hrs. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours; maximum of 2 hours credit for each academic term. Co- 
requisite: Admission to master's degree in economic development or the Ph.D. degree in international development. 
Internship with the Center for Community and Economic Development under faculty supervision. 

692. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Involves study m a specific topic of work in a specific 
area of research under the direction of a consulting faculty member. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using otiier resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-3 hrs. for a total of 6 hours. Independent research project initiated, designed, researched, and written by the 
student under the supervision of a major professor and a thesis committee. 

701. New South Economic Development Course. 2 hrs. Week-long course presenting a comprehensive overview of 
economic development as a process, a practice, and a profession. 

722 Advanced Research Methods in Economic Development 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ED 663 or equivalent. Examines 
research techniques applied to economic development problems, including impact, economic base, and retail trade area 
analysis; gatiiering, compilation, and presentation of community information; and industry targeting studies. Emphasizes 
computer analysis and use of the Internet. 

724 Advanced Economic Development Finance I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite. ED 650 or equivalent. Credit analysis process, 
permanent working capital analysis, cash flow analysis, and projections and deal structuring as diey are applied in 
economic development practice. 



Course Descriptions j| 263 



730. Theory of Technology Development 3 hrs. This course examines the theory, practive, implications, and history- of 
technological innovations. 

731. Stages of Technology Development 3 hrs. This course uses a contructivist approach to develop students' knowledge of 

the beginning stages of the technology development process. 

732. Fostering Creative Environments. 3 hrs. This course examines the factors that influence creative ideas and develop 
methods for promoting creatively which lead to economic development. 

748. International Economic Development Methods. 1 hr. Prerequisite: ED 646 or equivalent. Examines methods of 
promoting foreign direct investment and export assistance for domestic producers. 

761. Contemporary Issues in Economic Development 1-3 hrs. Analysis of selected issues of current importance to the 
practice of economic development. 

764. Economic Development Theory I. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 350 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 
Manufacturing, retail, service, and commercial location theory. 

765. Economic Development Theory n. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 350 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Regional 
and local economic development theory, including growth centers, economic base theory, and multiplier analysis. 

784. Best Practices in Economic Development 1 hr. Prerequisite: Approval of adviser and instructor. Case studies of 
selected examples of best practices in economic development 

789. Applied Problems in Economic Development 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Capstone course in creative 
problem solving designed to challenge and synthesize the student's proficiency in economic development practice. 
Several research problems are completed and defended based on the student's program of study and specializations. 

791. Apprenticeship. 2 hrs. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of adviser and consent of 
supervising instructor. Placement ui a mentoring environment in an economic development agency. 2 hours of credit for 
each academic term. 4 hours required. 

Economics (ECO) 

520. Economic Analysis for Managers. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Computer literacy, calculus. Microeconomic and macro- 
economic analysis as applied to managerial decision making. See also MBA 520. 

598. International Economics Seminar Abroad. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of program director. Conducted in London, 
England, a series of lectures and discussions involving authorities on international economic issues and practices. 

606. Microeconomic Analysis for Business. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 201-202 or ECO 520. A study of pricing and resource 
allocation with emphasis on applying microeconomic concepts. 

672 International Trade and Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: ECO 201-202, FIN 300, and consent of instructor. A study of 
international trade theory, balance of payments adjustment mechanisms, exchange rate determination, and the role of the 
MNC in the international economy. 

692. Special Problems in Economics. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite. Permission of department chair. 

699. International Economics Research Abroad. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of program director. A research course in 
international economics offered for students enrolled in ECO 598. 

Educational Administration (EDA) 

540. Community Education and the Professional Educator. 1 hr. Introduction to the concept of community education and 
its importance in building a base of community support for schools. 

598. British Studies: Studies in British Education. 3 hrs. Provides students with information on various topics related to 
British education and with field experiences related to British educational institutions. 

599. British Studies: Research in British Education. 3-6 hrs. To provide students with supervised research study on British 

education that relates to their interests or educational specialty. 

600. Introduction to Educational Leadership. 3 hrs. An introduction to leadership for student-centered schools. 

601. Introduction to Community Education. 3 hrs. Designed to acquaint students with the historical development of ^ m ^ ! ^ m 
community education and to review die basic components of the community school. 

*"' '- 
615 Student Discipline Techniques and Procedures for Teachers and Administrators 3 hrs Provides a comprehensive 

overview of strategies for disciplining students. 

616. Legal Considerations for School Leadership. 3 his. Provides a comprehensive overview of tlie legal rights and 
responsibilities of students, teachers, and administrators. 

620. Instructional Leadership - Supervision and Professional Development. 3 hrs The role and functions of the 
instructional leader in the modem school setting. 

628. Contextual Dimensions of the Principalship. 3 hrs. Focus is on skills essential for today's school leaders in student- 
centered schools. 



264 I Course Descriptions 



630. Organization and Administration of the Elementary School 3 hrs. Emphasizes the role, responsibilities, and functions 
of the principal in the modern elementary school. 

632. Organization and Administration of the Junior High and Middle Schools. 3 hrs. Examines the junior high-middle 
school function, objectives and program from the viewpoint of the administrator and supervisor. 

634. Organization and Administration of the Secondary School. 3 hrs. Emphasizes the role, responsibilities, and functions 
of the principal in the modem secondary school. 

636. Administrative Internship. 3-12 hrs. Intensive field experience under supervision of practitioner/mentor and university 
faculty coordinator. 

650. Educational Resources Development and Management 3 hrs. Emphasizes die relationship between effective 
management of financial resources and the instructional program. Includes attention to site-based budgeting. 

691. Research. 1-16 hrs. arr. 

692. Special Problems I, II, III. 1-3 hrs. A problem study to develop knowledge and facility in a field of interest for the 
student which requires preparation of a scholarly paper under the supervision of a graduate professor. 

694. Field Problems in Production I and II. 3 hrs. Opportunity to study local school problems under careful supervision of 
a graduate professor. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting witii die major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in tliis course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1 -6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed. 

700. Public School Finance. 3 hrs. Emphasizes principles of taxation; local, state, and federal financing of public education; 

equalization of education opportunity. 

701. Analysis of Teaching Behavior. 3 hrs. Designed to analyze teaching behavior to determine competency, including 
interaction analysis and microteacliing skills. 

702. Administrative Approaches to Technology. 3 hrs. Interactive Web-based course allows administrators to develop skills 

that enable diem to address technological issues in educational administration. 

704. School Community Relations. 3 hrs. A study of school community relations purposes, principles, policies, and 
procedures. 

706. Education Facilities Development and Management 3 hrs. A comprehensive study of the administrative function in 
facdities, renovation, planning, maintenance, and management 

708. Developing and Managing Human Resources. 3 hrs. Emphasizes die relationship between effective management of 
human resources and the instructional program. Includes attention to licensed and support personnel. 

710. School Law. 3 hrs. Legal aspects of such factors as school money, church-state relationships, injury to pupils, student and 
teacher rights, and related matters. 

720 Advanced Curriculum Development 3 hrs. Designed for the school administrator who has or will have responsibility 
for curriculum development in a school system. 

730. Media Skills for Successful School-Community Relations. 3 hrs. Designed to buUd communication skills needed for a 
successful school-community relations program. 

736. Practicum in Educational Administration. 3 hrs. Seminar-experiences in administrative problems from the standpoint 
of the chief school officer and the central office staff. 

738. Practicum in Supervision. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: EDA 620. An advanced seminar in supervisory services and current 
problems from a cenual office viewpoint. 

740. Advanced Instructional Supervision. 3 lirs. Prerequisites: EDA 600 and EDA 620. Designed to develop a systematic 
approach to instructional improvement that will be of use to die generalist or specialist. 

p* 742. Consensus Decision Making in Education. 3 hrs. Designed to help school administrators improve their skills in using 
H faculty and community groups in educational decision making. 

S 750. Administrative Workshop I, II, III, and IV 1 -5 hrs. per week. (Course may be repeated, with only nine hours counting 



toward a degree.) 
753. Evaluating Instructional Management 3 hrs. Provides strategies for assessing instructional management practices. 

755. The Superintendency. 3 hrs. Analyzes roles, responsibilities, and relationships as well as problems and issues associated 

with the position of school superintendent 

756. Developing Community Education. 3 hrs Designed to acquaint educators and agency representatives with the concept 

of community education and how it builds a strong base of community support for the schools. 



Course Descriptions | 265 



780. Educational Leadership Seminar. 3 hrs. The nature and roles of leadership in educational settings with emphasis on self 
assessment and leaderslup style in educational decision making. 

791. Research in Educational Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of major 
professor. 

792. Special Problems 3 hrs. 

794. Field Problems in Administration I, II, III. 1 hr. each A project dealing with a specific problem in school 
administration. An on-the-job training program with the work being done under the supervision of a graduate professor. 
This registration must be approved by the departmental chair upon die recommendation of the student's major professor. 

797. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
tliis course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

798. Specialist Thesis. 6 hrs. Selection of practical educational problems for solution by candidates for die specialist's degree, 

using research and professional knowledge. A scholarly report is required. 

800. Seminar: Theories in Educational Organization and Administration. 3 hrs. This course deals with the theories and 
concepts underlying present-day school organization, administration, and supervision. 

889. Special Topics Seminar. 1 hr. (max. 3 hrs.) A seminar for ln-residence doctoral students in educational administration, 

emphasizing current issues selected by students in consultation with faculty. 
898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 

Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) 

512. Advanced Circuit Analysis. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Corequisite: EET 512L. Transfer functions; 
network analysis by Laplace transform methods. Not open to master's of engineering technology candidates who have 
backgrounds in electrical or electronics engineering technology. 

512L. Advanced Circuit Analysis Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: EET 512. 

550. Microwave Technology. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: EET 315, MAT 317, PHY 112. Corequisite: EET 550L. Introduction to 
microwave technology. Emphasis, communications, radar, components, circuits, measurement techniques and fault. 

550L. Microwave Technology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: EET 550. 

561. Electric Power Generation and Distribution. 3 hrs. Power generation and distribution, load flow, faults, grids, and 
layout. 

592. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Supervised study in area of electronics engineering technology related to manufacturing. 

603. Digital Signal Processing. 3 hrs. Theory and applications of processing discrete data. MATLAB will be used in the 
development of DSP algorithms to manipulate signals, reduce noise, and extract information. 

604. Active and Digital Filtering. 3 hrs. Practical analog and digital filter design covering Butterworth, Chebyshev, and 
elliptic filters. Digital filter design to include IIR and FIR. Window function for FIR filters wdl also be covered. 

692. Special Problems. 1-3 hrs. Supervised study in (he area of electronics engineering technology. 

English (ENG) 

501. Advanced Grammar. 3 hrs. Introduces structural and transformational grammar. 

503. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 hrs. Introduces the principles of descriptive linguistics. 

506. History' of the English Language. 3 hrs. Surveys the development of the English language from Old English to die 
present. 

511. Studies in Postcolonial Literature. 3 hrs. Examines postcolonial literature from the 1 9th century to the present. 

513. Survey of the Modern Novel. 3 hrs. Examines major British and Continental novels of the last 100 years. 
515 Survey of Modern Poetry. 3 hrs. Acquaints students with the work of die significant modem poets, as well as the 

modem penod's important poetic innovations and movements. 



I 

lilliii 



III 



5 1 7. Survey of Modern Drama. 3 hrs. Surveys important British and Continental dramas of the 20tii century. 

518. Literature for the Adolescent 3 hrs. Study of literature and pedagogical dieory for use with secondary school students. 

5 1 9. Studies in World Literature. 3 hrs. Focuses on Continental, British, and American writers of die 1 9th and 20th centuries. 

Repeatable to 9 hours. 811111 

540 Literary Criticism. 3 hrs. Provides a histoncal approach to the study of literary criticism from the classical period to the 

present. Emphasis will be on major texts and major critics. E 



266 |j Course Descriptions 



545. Studies in Children's and Young Adult Literature. 3 lirs. Explores various literary topics in children's or young adult 
literature in a seminar setting. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

550. Survey of Medieval Literature, 500-1500. 3hrs. Surveys world literature of the period. 

551. Chaucer. 3 hrs. Emphasizes a close reading of TJie Canterbury Tales. 

552. Arthurian Literature. 3 hrs. Surveys the literature treating the legend of King Arthur. 

554. Survey of Shakespeare. 3 hrs. Studies a selected group of Shakespeare's work, including plays of several genres. 

555. Studies in Shakespeare. 3 hrs. Studies a selected group of Shakespeare's work according to genre, theme, or special topic. 

556. Survey of 16th-Century British Literature. 3 hrs. Studies the more important British writers of this period. 

557. Survey of the Development of British Drama to 1642. 3 hrs. Studies British drama from its beginnings to 1642, 
exclusive of Shakespeare. 

558. Survey of 17th-Century British Prose and Poetry. 3 hrs. Surveys British literature of the period 1600 to 1660, with 
emphasis on the "schools" of Donne and Jonson. 

559. Milton. 3 hrs. Studies the poetry and prose of Milton with emphasis on the major works. 

560. Survey of British Literature, 1660-1740. 3 hrs. Surveys British literature from the Restoration to 1740. 
562 Survey of British yterature, 1740-1798. 3 hrs. Surveys British literature from 1740 to 1798. 

563. Victorian Fiction Prose. 3 hrs. Survey of British fiction and nonfiction prose in die period 1830-1900. 

564. Survey of the British Novel to 1900. 3 his. Surveys the development of British fiction from Richardson through Hardy. 

565. Survey of 19th-century British Literature: Romantic 3 hrs. Surveys poetry and prose of the period 1790 to 1830. 

566. Victorian Poetry and Drama. 3 hrs. Survey of British poetry and drama of the period 1830-1900. 

567. Survey of 20th-century British Literature. 3 hrs. Studies major 20th-century British writers, emphasizing novelists 
and dramatists. 

568. British Women Writers. 3 hrs. Literature written by British women writers. Variable content. 

569. Studies in British Literature. 3 hrs Examines various topics in British literature. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

570. Survey of the American Literary Renaissance, 1820-1870. 3 hrs. Examines the writings of Emerson, Thoreau, 
Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, and others. 

571. Survey of the Rise of Realism in American Literature, 1870-1920. 3 hrs. Examines American literature after the Civil 

War, focusing on the tenns realism and naturalism. 

572. Survey of American Drama. 3 hrs. Studies American drama from its beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the 
20th century. 

573. Studies in African-American Literature. 3 hrs. Focuses on specific genres, topics, or writers of African- American 
Literature. 

577. Survey of die American Novel, 1920 to 1960. 3 hrs. Studies techniques and historical backgrounds of the major 
novelists. 

578. American Women Writers. 3 hrs. Literature written by American women writers. Variable content 

585. Uterature of the South. 3 hrs. Emphasizes the fiction, poetry, and drama of Southern writers. 

589. Studies in American Literature. 3 hrs. Studies notable movements, genres, and problems of American literature. 
Repeatable to 9 hours. 

593. Irish Studies. 4 hrs. A three-week course taught in Ireland as part of the Southern Miss British Studies Program. Content 
will vary. 

596. Caribbean Studies. 3 hrs. Variable content. Lecture series under the auspices of the Center for International and 
Continuing Education. 

597. Special Topics in British Literature. 6 hrs. A five-week course taught in London, England, offering an intensive study 

of special topics in British literature. 

598. British Studies I. 3-6 hrs. A five-week course taught in London, England. Generally offers an intensive study of topics 

and figures from die teginrung of English Uterature to 1800. 

599. British Studies II. 3-6 hrs. A five-week course taught in London, England. Generally offers an intensive study of topics 

and figures in English literature from 1800 to the present. 

609. Dimensions of Learning in English Education I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CIS 603, SPE 500, REF 632, CIS 700. 
Corequisite: REF 601 . Seminar and field experience in English education. 

610. Dimensions of Learning in English Education II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: ENG 609. Corequisite: CIR 754. Seminar and 
field experience in English education. Includes a classroom-based research project 

611. Topics in Contemporary Uterature. 3 hrs. A critical examination of a theme or themes in contemporary literature. 

Repeatable to 6 hours. 



Course Descriptions | 267 



612. Studies in Genre. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of a literary genre and its critical history. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

625. Readings in Fiction. 3 hrs. Studies in contemporary fiction. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

626. Readings in Poetry. 3 hrs. Studies in contemporary poetry. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

627. Introduction to Publishing. 3 hrs. A practical introduction to the business of literary publishing, concentrating on 
publishing and marketing. 

630. Teaching Composition. 3 hrs. Introduces students to composition pedagogy. 

631. Composition Research and Scholarship. 3 hrs. Examines resources and methods for research and scholarship; 
emphasizes empirical, rhetorical, and historical frameworks. 

632. Contemporary Composition Theory. 3 hrs. Surveys contemporary theories of composition and considers their 
implications for teaching writing. 

633. Rhetorical Dimensions of Composition. 3 hrs. Examines historical and contemporary theories of rhetoric in the 
context of composition theory and practice. 

640. Bibliography and Methods of Research in English. 3 hrs. Instruction in the collection, evaluation, and presentation of 

research materials. 
644. Topics in Literary Theory. 3 hrs. A critical exammation of important trends, movements, or issues in literary theory. 

Repeatable to 6 hours. 

650. Studies in Medieval Literature. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of world literature from the period 500-1500. 
Repeatable up to 6 hours. 

655. Studies in Shakespeare. 3 hrs. Provides a survey of a group of Shakespeare's plays chosen on die basis of genre, 
period, or theme. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

658. Studies in Renaissance Literature. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of literary works from the 16th and 17th centuries. 
Repeatable to 6 hours. 

661. Studies in the Restoration and 18th-Cenhny British Literature. 3hrs. Provides a focused survey in the literature of 
the restoration period through the 1 8th century. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

663. Studies in 19th-century British Literature. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of die poedy or prose of the 19th century. 
Repeatable to 6 hours. 

667. Studies in 20th-century British Literature. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of 20th-century British literature. 
Repeatable to 6 hours. 

669. Topics in British Literature. 3 hrs. A critical examination of important trends, movements, and issues in British 
literature. Repeatable up to 6 hours. 

670. Studies in American Literature 1. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of selected American writers and movements before 

1 900. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

671. Studies in American Literature II. 3 hrs. Provides a focused survey of selected American writers and movements since 

1900. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

672. Topics in American Literature. 3 hrs. A critical examination of a theme or themes in American literature. Repeatable to 

6 hours. 

673. Topics in African-American Literature. 3 hrs. A critical examination of genres, topics, or writers of African- American 

literature. Repeatable to 6 hours. 

678. Topics in Writing by Women. 3 hrs. A critical examination of a genre, topic, or theme in women's literature. Repeatable 
to 6 hours. 

690. Teaching Freshman Composition. 1 hr. Paces English 101 and 102. Provides practical models for writing assignments, 
teaching techniques, and classroom management for teachers of Freshman Composition. Repeatable to 4 hours. Credit 
hours do not count toward degree. 

692. Special Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Provides the opportunity to pursue a special topic or area of 
interest Repeatable to 6 hours. 

694. Studies in Basic Writing. 3 hrs. Examines theoretical, historical, and cultural issues in the teaching of basic writing. 

695. Advanced Methods in English. 3 hrs. Analyzes recent theories and practices in the teaching of composition, literature, 

and language in post-elementary institutions. Repeatable to 9 hours. Credit hours do not count toward English degree. 

696. Studies in Technical and Professional Writing. 3 hrs. Examines die history and tiieory of scientific and teclinical 
discourse as well as pedagogical applications. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of diesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 



IIP 



268 ;j Course Descriptions 



698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hours. 

702. Readings in Linguistics. 3 hrs. Examines varying topics, but usually treats practical aspects of classroom problems 
arising from widely varying dialects in the public schools. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

703. Seminar in Teaching English as a Second Language. 3 hrs. Examines the practical application of linguistic principles 

to second language teaching. 

711. Seminar in Postcolonial Literature. 3 hrs. Examines postcolonial literature from the 1 9th century to the present. 

714. Tutorial in English and Germanic Philology. 3 hrs. Develops specialized area of inquiry unavailable in die regular 
curriculum. 

716. Seminar in Modern World Literature. 3 hrs. Examines varying topics in British and Continental literature of the 20th 
century: authors, movements, and genres. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

721. Seminar in Fiction Writing. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center 

for Writers. Workshop in fiction writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M. A. , to 1 8 hours for PhD. 

722. Seminar in Poetry Writing. 3 hrs. Prerequisites". Graduate standing, permission of instructor, and enrollment in Center 

for Writers. Workshop in poetry writing. Repeatable to 9 hours for M. A., to 1 8 hours for Ph.D. 

723. Seminar in Nonfiction Writing. 3 hrs. Workshop in the writing of nonfiction prose, memoir, and personal essay. 
Repeatable to 9 hours. 

730. Seminar in Literacy Theory. 3 hrs. Considers the role of writing in current conceptions of literacy and explores literacy 
practices from a cultural perspective. 

733. Teaching/Administrative Internship in Writing. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Completion of 15 hours of coursework in 
rhetoric and composition and permission of instructor. Provides doctoral-level students with supervised experience in 
teaching writing or directing writing programs. 

735. Issues in Writing Program Administration. 3 hrs. Focuses on issues and research relating to writing program 
administration in post-secondary institutions. 

744. Seminar in Literary Criticism. 3 hrs. Examines specific issues in critical theory. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

750. Anglo-Saxon. 3 hrs. Examines the Old English language and representative English literature prior to 1066. 

751. Beowulf. 3 hrs. Reading Beowulf in Anglo-Saxon. 

753. Middle English. 3 hrs. Presents readings in Middle English literature exclusive of Chaucer, emphasizing the language 
and dialects of English from 1 100 to 1500. 

754. Seminar in Medieval Literature. 3 hrs. Focuses on the works of a major English medieval writer or group of writers. 

Repeatable to 9 hours. 

758. Seminar in Renaissance Literature. 3 hrs. Studies die works of a major English Renaissance writer or group of writers. 
Repeatable to 9 hours. 

760. Seminar in 17th-Century British Literature. 3 hrs. Provides extensive study of an author, topic, or genre in 17th- 
century British literature. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

761. Seminar in 18th-Century British Literature. 3 hrs. Provides extensive study of an author, topic, or genre in 18th- 
century British literature. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

763. Seminar in English Romanticism. 3 hrs. Provides extensive study of selected poets and topics from the Romantic Era 

(1790-1 830). Repeatable to 9 hours. 

764. Seminar in Victorianism. 3 hrs. Provides extensive study of selected authors and topics from the Victorian Era (1830- 

1910). Repeatable to 9 hours. 

769. Seminar in Modem British Literature. 3 hrs. Offers an examination of important modem British figures and 
movements. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

770. Seminar in American Literature 1. 3 hrs. Presents a detailed study of selected American writers and movements before 

1900. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

771. Seminar in American Literature II. 3 hrs. Presents a detailed study of selected American writers and movements since 

1900. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

772 Readings in American Literature. 3 hrs. Presents a detailed study of selected American writers and movements. 
Repeatable to 9 hours. 

773. Seminar in African-American Literature. 3 hrs. Provides a detailed study of selected genres, topics, or writers of 
African- American literature. Repeatable to 9 hours. 

790. Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hrs. Provides extensive study and research in a special topic (such as Writing 

Assessment, Feminist Perspectives on Language and Literacy, Discourse Analysis, Cultural Studies and Composition, 
Composition and the Postmodern). Repeatable to 9 hours. 

791. Research in English. 1-16 hrs. Prerequisite: Approval of major professor. Must be taken pass/fail. Credit hours do not 
count toward degree. 



Course Descriptions | 269 



792. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Provides the opportunity to pursue a special topic or 
area of interest Repeatable to 6 hours. 

797. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in 
this course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively 
working on a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in 
this course for at least 3 hours each semester. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 

Environmental Science (ESC) 

501. Environmental Sampling. 4 hrs. Methods for sampling and solids, liquids, and gases for environmental testing. 

506. Environmental Remediation. 3 hrs. Study of the environmental remediation process and methods for contaminated 
soils, sludges, slurries, and water systems. 

550. Pollution Control. 3 hrs. Study of pollution, its origin and effects, and methods of pollution abatement Emphasis on 
control mechanisms, industrial control equipment, operations, and regulations 

592. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Topics and content related to 
current research and practice in environmental science. 

692. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Topics and content related to 
current research and practice in environmental science. 

Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) 

509. Occupational Family and Consumer Sciences. 3 hrs. Developing and evaluating teaching units for family and 
consumer sciences-related occupational programs 

601. Family Life Education. 3 hrs. General philosophy and broad principles of family life education with emphasis on 
planning, implementing, and evaluating such educational programs. 

605. Supervision of Family and Consumer Sciences Education. 3 hrs. Practices and procedures in the supervision of 
vocational family and consumer sciences. 

606. Selected Topics in Family and Consumer Sciences Education. 3 hrs. (may be repeated once) Prerequisite: 
Corresponding subject matter course. The development and application of units of work in selected areas in the 
secondary school program. 

607. Curriculum Problems in Family and Consumer Sciences. 3 hrs. A practicum for developing family and consumer 
sciences curriculum materials for local schools. 

610. Seminar in Family and Consumer Sciences Education. 1-6 hrs. Current trends and issues in family and consumer 
sciences. 

611. Evaluation in Family and Consumer Sciences. 3 hrs. Theory and practice of systematic evaluation of components of 

family and consumer sciences programs, including occupational family and consumer sciences. 

612 Field Experience in Family and Consumer Sciences-Related Occupations. 6 hrs Supervised work experience in 
approved family and consumer sciences occupations. Can only be counted toward occupational certification. 

615. Methods, Materials, and Information Technology in Family and Consumer Sciences. 3 hrs. Emphasis on new 
developments in teaching family and consumer sciences, including computer technology. 

630. Dimensions of Learning in Family and Consumer Sciences Education L 3 hrs. The first of a two-semester course 
sequence providing a broad introduction to the concepts, contexts, and practices of teaching, as well as specific 
instruction in secondary family and consumer sciences methods. Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the 
master of arts in teaching (MAT) degree program. This course includes a clinical supervision component 

631. Dimensions of Learning in Family and Consumer Sciences Education II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FCS 630. The second 
of a two-semester course sequence providing a broad introduction to the concepts, contexts, and practices of teaching, 
as well as specific instruction in secondary family and consumer sciences methods. Enrollment is restricted to students 
admitted to the master of arts in teaching (MAT) degree program. This course includes a clinical supervision component. 

691. Research. 1-4 hrs. 

692. Special Problems in Family and Consumer Sciences Education. 14 hrs. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed. 



Stli 



270 |! Course Descriptions 



S3 



Family Studies (FAM) 



598 



600 



610 



615 



«B 



British Studies Program: Aging and the Family. 3-6 hrs. Current topics, trends, and issues which impact the family. 
Offered in London, England. 

Prepracticum in Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: FAM 655 and permission of the instructor. 
Students are expected to gain basic clinical competencies in preparation for working with families. 

Marital Therapy. 3 hrs. A survey of die major of marital and couple therapy with an emphasis on evidence-based 
treatment. 

Gender and Culture in the Family. 3 hrs. Designed to help students integrate theoretical, research, and developmental 
applications of gender and cultural issues into their understanding of the family and in the practice of systems therapy. 

645. Financial Problems of Families. 3 hrs. Study of family resource utilization emphasizing methods of assisting families in 
effective planning. 

650. Individual and Family Life Cycle Development 3 hrs. Content of human interactions and die process of change in 
family structures over time is assessed in light of systems theory and family life cycle development theory. 

651. Parents and Children: Problem Resolution. 3 hrs. A study of both functional and dysfunctional relationship patterns 
between parents and children/adolescents. Focus is on the systematic intervention process. 

652. Marriage Adjustment: Communication and Conflict. 3 hrs. Mate selection, marital adjustment, divorce, and 
remarriage are examined. Emphasis will be on communication, power struggles, and problem solving in relation to 
cybernetics dieory. 

653. Aging and the Family. 3 hrs. Family-oriented problem solving and its relation to major gerontological issues such as 
intergenerational snuggles, independence, loneliness, alternative living arrangements, etc. 

654. Special Topics in Gerontology. 1-3 hrs. Study of current issues in the field of aging. Topics will vary. May be repeated 

for a maximum of 9 hours with permission of adviser. 

655. Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy I: Survey of Major Models. 3 hrs. A survey of the major models of family 

and systems theory including general systems, family systems, cybernetics, intergenerational. structural, strategic, 
experiential, and postmodern models. 

656. Theories of Marriage and Family Therapy II: Evidence-Based Treatment 3 hrs. A survey of treatment approaches 
with demonstrated effectiveness based on empirically validated research. 

658. Seminar in Family Relations. 3 hrs. (may be repeated for a total of 6 hrs.) Current topics, trends, and issues which 
concern and affect farrulies. 

659. Ethics and Professional Issues in Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 hr. A consideration of the ethical foundations for 
the professional practice of marriage and family therapy. The American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy 
(AAMFT) Code of Ethics serves as a guide for the study of legal and personal roles and personal responsibilities in 
therapy, research, and professional development 

660. Assessment in Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 hrs. Assessment of dysfunctional relationship patterns using 
appropriate major mental healtli assessment instruments and structured techniques designed for systemic intervention. 

663. Professional Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy. 3 hrs. A survey of non-normative family experiences as well 
as current trends in marriage and family therapy. 

665. Sex Therapy. 3 hrs. Sexual development and attitudes towards sex are explored. Physical, psychological, emotional, and 
systemic processes in chronic sexual problems and specific intervention strategies are examined. 

675. Practice of Family Research. 3 hrs. Provides conceptual background and application of research methods for the social 
disciplines. 

688. Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabilities. 3 hrs. Medical conditions, diagnostic tests, and other health care issues 
relevant to individuals with developmental disabilities. 

690. Practicum in Family and Consumer Studies. 3-9 hrs. Prerequisite: FCS 401 or 501 and permission of instructor. 
Supervised experiences in family and consumer studies. 

691. Research in Family and Consumer Studies. 1-16 hrs. 

692. Special Problems in Family Relations. 1 -4 hrs. 

697. Independent Study and Research. 1-9 hrs. arranged. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively 
working on a thesis, consulting with die major professor, or using odier resources of die university may enroll in tiiis 
course. Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working 
on a thesis, consulting witii the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in tiiis course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. Credit deferred until thesis is completed. 

790. Supervised Practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy. 1-6 hrs Prerequisites: FAM 656, FAM 660, FAM 600, and 
permission of the clinical faculty. Supervised clinical training with couples and fanulies. May be repeated. 

794. Marriage and Family Supervision. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Penmssion of instructor. Major models of marriage and family 
therapy and supervision are examined. 



Course Descriptions || 271 



Finance (FIN) 

570. Managerial Finance. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: Computer literacy, MBA 511. A study of financial analysis in managerial 
decision making. See also MBA 570. 

598. International Financial Seminar Abroad. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: Consent of program director. Conducted in London, 
England; a series of lectures and discussions involving authorities on international financial issues and practices. 

640. Money and Capital Markets. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 300. Study of the operations of financial markets and financial 
institutions and their role in the economy. 

652. Problems in Investment. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FIN 300. Application of tested and experimental theories by investment 
managers to problems of short-and long-term decision making. 

692. Special Problems in Finance. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. A supervised course in individual study 
and research. 

699. International Finance Research Abroad. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of program director. A research course in 
international finance offered for students enrolled in FIN 598. 

Foreign Languages (FL) 

561. Teaching Second Languages: Theory into Practice. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Familiarizes students 
with the major aspects of foreign/second language teaching theory and with the variety of instructional approaches and 
techniques pertinent to the foreign/second language teaching and learning situation 

562. Translation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

581 . Advanced Credit for Study Abroad. 3-9 hrs. arr. Prerequisites: Advanced knowledge of the language to be studied; prior 
arrangements must be made for the evaluation and receipt of credit. Credit will be granted for systematic study of die 
language and culture or the language and literature of a foreign area. Study must be under the direction of a recognized 
teaching institution approved in advance by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. The department will 
examine and grade the progress and achievement of the participants in this program before granting credit. 

609. Dimensions of Learning in Foreign Language Education I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: CIS 603, SPE 500, REF 632, CIS 
700. Corequisite: REF 601. Seminar and field experience in foreign language education. 

610. Dimensions of Learning in Foreign Language Education II. 3 hrs Prerequisite: FL 609. Corequisite: CIR 754. 
Seminar and field experience in foreign language education. Includes a classroom-based research project. 

663. Applied Linguistics in Second and Foreign Languages. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of fundamental 

aspects of linguistics with an emphasis on application to second and foreign language learning and instruction. 

664. Second Language Acquisition Theory and Practice, 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Current trends in second 

language acquisition dieory and research. Students will develop an awareness of how SLA theory and research apply to 
their specific second or foreign language learning and teaching practice. 

665. Sociocul rural and Sociolinguistic Perspectives in Language. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Provides 
students with the knowledge of the relationship between language and its social context, with an emphasis on the 
application of that knowledge to an understanding of second and foreign language acquisition and to the instruction of 
second and foreign language learners. 

690. Foreign Language Teaching Seminar. I hr. Ongoing supeivision and professional development for TAs and adjuncts in 

the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. May be repeated for a total of 4 hours. 

691 . Research. 1-9 hrs. Credit hours may not count towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

692. Special Problems. 1-9 hrs. by pnor arrangement only. 

694. Practicum in Second or Foreign Language. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FL 561. Provides students with opportunities to gain 
language classroom experience, to enhance their teaching skills, and to reflect on the nature and processes of second or 
foreign language teaching. These objectives will be reached through reflection, observation, and hands-on experience. 

697. Independent Study. 1-9 hrs 
French (FRE) 

501. French Reading for Research I. 3 hrs. Beginning study of fundamental structures and vocabulary to facilitate reading 
in French for research. Credit hours may not count towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and S 
Literatures. fej 

502. French Reading for Research II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FRE 501. A continuation of the study of language structures and g 
vocabulary begun in French 501. Readings from a variety of disciplines will be examined. Credit hours may not count gj 
towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

505. French Phonology. 3 hrs. An introduction to French phonemics and phonetics with intensive practice in the 
pronunciation of French. 



'•m 



w. 



272 jj Course Descriptions 



506. Advanced Composition. 3 hrs. Practice in descriptive, narrative, analytical, and research composition, with attention to 
style, vocabulary, and morphology, as well as methods of organization and presentation. 

511. Advanced Conversation. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of French. Intensive practice in formal and informal 
language use on topics drawn from print and electronic media. 

531 . French Film. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of sociocultural and historical aspects of French films. 

534. France in the Fifth Republic. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Contemporary French education, politics, social 

and intellectual attitudes, and urban and rural life. 

535. Modern France. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Overview of the period of French history from 1870 to 1970, 

including topics such as die fonnation of die Third Republic, the foundation of French Socialism, Modernism in art and 
literature, and colonial and postcolonial upheaval. May be repeated once. 

536. Francophone Civilization and Culture. 3 hrs. Studies in die history, art, beliefs, behaviors, and values of French- 
speaking cultures. Topics will vary. May be repeated once. 

537. Topics in French Culture. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Variable topics in the study of French culture. May 

be repeated as content varies. 

542. Survey of French Literature. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be taken for a total of 6 hours if contents 
vary. 

545. Topics in French Literature. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of 6 hours if topics vary. 

546. French Novel and Short Story. 3 hrs. Prose fiction of the 18th, 19tii, and 20th centunes, studied in conjunction with 
films based on the works or thematically related to them. 

581. Advanced Credit for Study Abroad. 1 -9 hrs. air. Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of French; prior arrangements must 
be made for the evaluation and receipt of credit. Credit will be granted for systematic study of the language and culture 
or the language and literature of a foreign area. Study must be under the direction of a recognized teaching institution 
approved in advance by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. The department wdl examine and grade 
the progress and achievement of the participants in this program before granting credit. 

591. Advanced Studies in the French Language. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Content varies in response to 
students' interests and needs. May be repeated once. 

612. Options in the Teaching of Grammar. 3 hrs. An introduction to approaches to the aquisition and teaching of French 
grammar, along with an exploration of challenging grammatical aspects of the language. 

641 . French Seminar. 3 hrs. May be taken for a total of 9 hours if topics vary. 

692. Special Problems in the Teaching of French. 1-3 hrs. by prior arrangement only. May be repeated as content varies. 

German (GER) 

501. German Reading for Research 1. 3 hrs. Beginning study of fundamental structures and vocabulary to facilitate reading 

in German for research. Credit hours may not count towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 

502. German Reading for Research II. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GER 501. A continuation of the study of language structures and 

vocabulary begun in German 501. Readings from a variety of disciplines will be examined. Credit hours may not count 
towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

505. German Diction and Phonetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

506. Advanced Grammar. 3 hrs. Advanced study of German grammar; reading and stylistic analysis. 

581. Study Abroad. 1-9 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of German, prior arrangements must be made for the 
evaluation and receipt of credit Credit will be granted for systematic study of the language and culture or die language 
and literature of a foreign area. Study must be under die direction of a recognized teaching institution approved in 
advance by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. The department will examine and grade the progress 
and achievement of die participants in this program before granting credit. 

645. German Seminar. 3 his. May be taken for a total of 9 hours if topics vary. 

H| Greek (GRK) 

j|| 545. Reading in Greek Literature. 3 hrs. 

Italian (ITA) 

581. Advanced Credit for Study Abroad. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of Italian; prior arrangements must be 
made for die evaluation and receipt of credit. Credit will be granted for systematic study of the language and culture 
or the language and literature of a foreign area. Study must be under the direction of a recognized teaching institution 
approved in advance by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. The department will examine and grade 
the progress and achievement of the participants in this program before granting credit 



I 



Course Descriptions J 273 



Latin (LAT) 

545. Reading in Latin Literature. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor May be taken for a total of 9 hours if topic vanes. 

Spanish (SPA) 

501. Spanish Reading for Research 1. 3 hrs. Beginning study of fundamental structures and vocabulary to facilitate reading 

in Spanish for research. Credit hours may not count towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 

502. Spanish Reading for Research EL 3 hrs. Prerequisite: SPA 501. A continuation of the study of language structures and 
vocabulary begun in Spanish 501. Readings from a variety of disciplines will be examined. Credit hours may not count 
towards a degree in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. 

505. Spanish Phonetics. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A contrastive study of the phonetic systems of English 
and Spanish with emphasis in production of speech sounds, correction of exercises in pronunciation, and problems in 
learning the sound system of a second language. 

506. Advanced Composition and Grammar. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Understanding of die grammatical 

concepts, forms and practice in descriptive, narrative, analytical, and research composition with attention to grammar 
and style, as well as methods of organization. 

511. The Spanish Subjunctive. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Understanding the mode of the subjunctive inner 
world Discussion, comparison between the indicative and subjunctive moods and learning problems. 

521. Advanced Conversation. 3 his. Prerequisite: SPA 421, equivalent, or consent of instructor. Development of oral skills 
and strategies dirough intensive practice in speaking and listening comprehension, using the ACTFL Oral Proficiency 
Guidelines, teaching as well as extensive research in oral language proficiency. 

533. Hispanic Film. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Overview of Spanish and Spanish- American cinema. 
Discussions will emphasize cultural, sociohistorical, and pedagogical issues. 

535. Spanish Culture and Civilization. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Examines sociopolitical, cultural history, 
and construction of social values in the Spanish society as well as forms of regional, national, and gender identity. 

536. Latin American Culture and Civilization. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A chronological survey of Hispanic 

civilization and institutions. 

542. Survey of Spanish Literature. 3 hrs. Prerequisite. Consent of instructor. May be taken for a total of 6 hours if topics 
vary. 

545. Topics in Spanish Literature. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be taken for a total of 6 hours if topics vary. 

546. Don Quixote. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A study of the Cervantes novel, of its historical and literary 
background, and of the principal critical materials. 

552. Topics in Latin American Literature. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be taken for a total of 6 hours if 
topics vary. 

581. Advanced Credit for Study Abroad. 1-9 hrs. Prerequisite: Advanced knowledge of Spanish; prior arrangements for 
evaluation and receipt of credit Credit will be granted for systematic study of the language and culture or the language 
and literature of an Hispanic area. Study must be under the direction of a recognized teaching institution approved in 
advance by the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures. The department will examine and grade the progress 
and achievement of the participants in this program before granting credit. 

591. Advanced Studies in the Spanish Language. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Content varies in response to 
students' interests and needs Topics include syntax, lexicography, and etymology. May be repeated once. 

605. Old Spanish. 3 hrs. Prerequisite. Consent of instructor. 

609. Spanish Lexical Problems. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A study of correct vocabulary usage, with 
composition practice. 

612. Spanish Pedagogical Grammar. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Exploration and development of ways of 
teaching concepts and techniques with a view of grammar as a coherent system, its internal logic, and the strategies to 
use in die classroom. 

.641: Spanish Seminar: 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. May be taken for a total of 9 hours if topics vary 

645. Teaching Reading in Spanish. 3 hrs. An introduction to current reading theory, reasearch and techniques relevant to the 
teaching of Spanish 

661. Spanish Reading. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Development of reading skills and of suitable reading 
materials for the Spanish classroom. 

685. Teaching Spanish for Special Purposes. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Methods and materials for teaching 

such groups as law enforcement, health care, and business personnel. May be taken for a total of 6 hours if topics vary 
692. Special Problems in the Teaching of Spanish. 1-3 hrs. by prior arrangement only. May be repeated as content varies. 



274 || Course Descriptions 



fi 



Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TSL) 

612. Options in the Teaching of Grammar in ESL/EFL. 3 hrs. An introduction to approaches to the acquisition and teaching 
of grammar in English as a second or foreign language. 

64 1 . TESOL Seminar. 3 hrs. May be repeated as content varies. Content varies in response to students' interests and needs. 

645. Reading in ESL/EFL Instruction. 3 hrs. An introduction to current reading theory, research, and techniques relevant to 
the teaching of English as a second or foreign language. 

692. Special Problems in TESOL 3 hrs. by prior arrangement only May be repeated as content varies. 

Film (FLM) 

536. Western Film. 3 hrs. The course examines the interaction of stylistic and thematic elements associated with the Western 
film genre. 

571. Advanced Cinematography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Advanced instruction and practical production 
experience in 16mm motion picture cinematography. Repeatable for up to 6 hours. 

573. The Documentary Film. 3 hrs. Evaluation of the documentary tradition in film through viewing and analysis of selected 

documentaries and review of pertinent literature. 

574. Film Noir. 3 hrs. The course examines the interaction of stylistic and thematic elements associated with the Film Noir 
period and their impact on contemporary cinema. 

575. Film Business Procedures and Management 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of the business practices 

and problems involved in film production. 

576. British Studies: The British Film. 3-6 hours. 

577. Advanced Film Production Workshop. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Students enrolled in this course 
will serve as director, cinematographer, or film editor of a complete 16mm motion picture production. 

578. Seminar in Film. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Examination of a film topic. May be repeated with a 
different topic. 

579. Film Theory and Criticism. 3 hrs. Study of major film theories through study of the literature of film theory and the 
screening and discussion of selected films. 

585. Film Editing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: FLM 571. Study of the theory and techniques of film editing. Repeatable for up to 6 
hours. 

Forensic Science (FSC) 

530. Survey of Forensic Toxicology. 3 lirs. Toxicology as applied to forensic investigations. 

540. Drug Identification. 3 hrs. Lectures, demonstrations, and discussions covering all aspects of drug identification, 
emphasizing those related to law enforcement. 

542 Arson and Explosives. 3 hrs. Introduction to the investigation of arson and bombings. 

542L Arson and Explosives Laboratory. 1 hr. 

545. Crime Scene Documentation. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Concurrent registration in FSC 545L is 
required. The processing of crime scene, including crime scene photography, sketching of the crime scene, and collecting 
and processing evidence. 

545L Crime Scene Documentation Laboratory. 2 hrs. Concurrent registration in FSC 545 is required. 

580 Seminar in Forensic Science. 3 hrs May be repeated for credit. Designed to cover areas of significance in the field 
of forensic science. Topics may include medio-legal death investigation, vehicle fire investigation, and forensic 
photography. 

591 . Special Projects in Forensic Science. 1 hr. Individual studies in forensic science principles. 

591 L. Laboratory for Forensic Science 591. 3 hrs. Hands-on experience with true forensic science situations. 

597. Field Study in Forensic Science. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of director of forensic science. Field work offering 
research and practice in a forensic science setting. 

599. British Studies. 1-6 hrs. Variable content. Lecture series and research abroad under the auspices of the Center for 
International and Continuing Education. 

691. Research. 1-16 hrs. 

698. Thesis. 6 hrs. 

General Studies (GS) 

500 Orientation to Instructional Settings. 1 hr. 



Course Descriptions | 275 



Geography (GHY) 



500. Geography of Mississippi. 3 hrs. Survey of physical, economic and historical geography of state; emphasis on man- 
environment relations and problems. 

501. Geography of the United States and Canada. 3 hrs. A geograpliical analysis of the physical and human characteristics 

of the region. 

502. Geography of Middle America and the Caribbean. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the physical and human 
characteristics of the region. 

503. Geography of South America. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the physical and human characteristics of the region 

504. Geography of Europe. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the physical and human characteristics of the region. 

505. Geography of Russia. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the physical and human characteristics of the region. 

506. Geography of Africa. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the physical and human characteristics of the region. 

507. Geography of East and South Asia. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the physical and human characteristics of the 
region. 

508. Geography of Southwest Asia. 3 his. A geographical analysis of the physical and human characteristics of the region. 

510. 21st-century Cartography. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GHY 510L. Design of maps and graphs to effectively communicate 
spatial information. Map and geographic data sources. 

510L. Ust-Century Cartography Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GHY 510. Use of mapping software to design and 
construct effective maps and techniques for obtaining maps and geographic data from the Internet and other sources. 

511. Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation. 3 hrs. Corequisite: GHY 511L. Acquisition, analysis, and interpretation 
of aerial photographic products, digital remotely sensed imagery, and the analytic tools in current use by the public and 
private sectors. 

511L. Remote Sensing and Image Interpretation Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GHY 511. Application of remote sensing 
and image interpretation principles using manual and automated analysis tools. 

512. Environmental Remote Sensing. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 511 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: GHY 
512L. Advanced image processing techniques using a variety of images and computer packages. Course focus is on 
environmental applications and integration with other spatial analysis tools. 

5 12L Environmental Remote Sensing Laboratory. 1 hr. Prerequisite: GHY 51 1L or permission of instructor. Corequisite: 
GHY 512. Students are exposed to a variety of advanced image processing techniques using digital remote sensing 
imagery. 

516. Computer Application in Geography. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GHY 516L. Role of personal computers in geography. 
Concepts and applications of computerized geographic mapping, information, simulation, and analytic techniques. 

5 16L Computer Applications in Geography Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GHY 516. Operation of computerized 
geographic mapping, information, simulation, and analytic systems. 

517. Geographic Information Systems. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GHY 517L. Concepts and applications of geographic 
information systems in natural and human resource management and business decision-making. 

5 17L Geographic Information Systems Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GHY 517. Operation of computerized geographic 
information systems for decision-making. 

518. Spatial Analysis. 2 hrs. Prerequisite: GHY 5 1 7. Corequisite: GHY 5 1 8L. Theory and application of geographic 
information systems and spatial statistics in decision-making 

518L. Spatial Analysis Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GHY 518. Design, construction, and use of a geographic information 
system database. 

5 1 9. Managing Geographic Information Systems. 1 hr. Theory and practice of managing a geographic information 
system. 

522. Biogeography. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Study of plant and animal distributions, and human impacts on 
distributions, from a geographic, geological, and biological perspective. May be taken as BSC 506. 

525. Environmental Climatology. 3 lirs. Acquisition, analysis, and interpretation of meteorological and climatological data. 
Particular emphasis is placed on understanding climatic anomalies at a variety of time scales, as well as on human- 
environmental interactions. 

527. Meteorology. 3 hrs. Study of temporal and areal variations in composition, structure, and workings of the atmosphere. 
Practice m use of instruments and measurements. 

528. Severe Storms. 3 hrs. An examination of the causes, characteristics, and destructive nature of severe weather. 

535. Historical Geography of the American Landscape. 3 hrs. Examines the nature and causes of change in the human 
landscape of the United States. 



I Course Descriptions 



276 

540. Population and Human Resources. 3 hrs. A geographical analysis of the spatial variations in demographic and non- 
demographic aspects of human populations. 

541. Contemporary Issues in Geography Seminar. 3 lirs. Prerequisite: 18 hours credit in geography. This discussion course 
focuses on analysis of the geographical background to topical issues. 

542. Social Geography: Values Systems and Landscape Change.3 hrs. An analysis of the relationship between 
geographical patterns of human social organization, social values, and spatial patterns of landscape change. 

551. Theories of Economic Location. 3 hrs. Principles of economic location analysis with emphasis on locational decision 
making and investment by different types of business. Relevance to economic development and planning is stressed. 

589. Caribbean Studies. 1-6 hrs. Variable content. Lecture series, field exercises, and research offered abroad under the 
auspices of the Center for International and Continuing Education. 

598. Study Abroad. 1-6 hre. Students gain experience of foreign environments, both cultural and physical, through structured 
programs offered by the Center for International and Continuing Education. 

599. British Studies: Geography of the British Isles. 3-6 hrs. An overview of the human and physical geography of the 
British Isles. Includes field trips and directed research. 

610. Seminar in Research Techniques and Presentation of Geographic Data. 1-3 hrs. Required of all geography graduate 
students. 

612. Seminar in Geographic Information Science. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content to include 
cartographic, aerial photo interpretation, remote sensing, statistical, and geographic information systems. 

615. Quantitative Methods in Spatial Analysis. 3 hrs. An advanced course in statistical and other quantitative techniques 
applied to problems of spatial analysis. 

617. Geography for Teachers. 3 hrs. Current theories, practices, and techniques used in teaching geography at the elementary 
and secondary levels. 

623. Seminar in Environmental Climatology. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content. 

624. Landscape Ecology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Principles of landscaper ecology - die effects of patterns 
on processes - as a framework for landscape researcli, analysis, and management. 

631. Seminar in Cultural-Historical Geography. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours witii change in content 

650. Seminar in Economic Geography. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content 

680. Seminar in History and Development of Geographic Thought 3 hrs. 

691 . Internship. 1-9 hrs. The internship gives the students credit for practical, supervised experience m the workplace. May be 

repeated to a maximum of 9 hours. 

692. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. 

693. Internship in Geographic Information. 1-6 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Internship in GIS, remote 
sensing, and cartography. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. 

694. Prolaboratory in Geographic Information. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Pennission of instructor. Preparation and presentation 

of a professional GIS, cartographic, or remote sensing project. May be repeated with change of content for a total of 6 
hours of credit. 

697. Independent Study and Research. Hours arr. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively working 
on a thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university may enroll in this course. 
Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of thesis but who are actively working on a 
thesis, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course for at 
least 3 hours each semester. 

698. Thesis. 1-6 hrs. for a total of 6 hrs. 

710. Seminar in Research Techniques and Presentation of Geographic Data. 1-3 hrs. Required of all geography gradaute 
students. 

712. Seminar in Geographic Information Science. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content to include 
cartographic, aerial photo interpretation, remote sensing, statistical, and geographic information systems. 

715. Quan tithe Methods in Spatial Analysis. 3 hrs. An advanced course in statistical and other quantitative techniques 
applied to problems of spatial analysis. 

717. Geography for Teachers. 3 hrs. Current theories, practices, and techniques used in teaching geography at the elementary 
and secondary levels. 

721. Tropical Lands and Peoples. 3 hrs. An examination of peoples and places in tropical regions of the world. Attention is 
paid to natural environments, resource management, and cultural systems. 

723. Seminar in Environmental Climatology. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content. 



Course Descriptions J 277 



724. Landscape Ecology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Principles of lanscaper ecology - the effects of patterns on 
processes - as a framework for landscape research analysis, and management. 

731. Seminar in Cultural-Historical Geography. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content. 

741. Seminar in Cultural and Political Ecology. 3 hrs. A seminar covering theory and research on human-environment 
interactions in geography, focusing on the sub-fields of cultural and political ecology. 

750. Seminar in Economic Geography. 3 hrs. May be repeated up to 6 hours with change in content. 

755. Field Methods in Geography. 3 hrs. Basic metiiods of geographic analysis used in generating, classifying, analyzing, 
and reporting field-generated data. 

780 Seminar in History and Development of Geographic Thought. 3 hrs. 

892. Special Problems. 1-6 hrs. 

894. Prolaboratory in GIScience. 1-3 hrs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and enrollment in doctoral program. 
Preparation and presentation of a professional GIS, cartographic, or remote sensing project. May be repeated with 
change of content for a total of 6 hours of credit 

897. Independent Study and Research. Hours arr. Not to be counted as credit toward a degree. Students actively working on 

a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources for the university may enroll in this course. 
Students who are not in residence and are not enrolled in at least 3 hours of dissertation but who are actively working on 
a dissertation, consulting with the major professor, or using other resources of the university must enroll in this course 
for at least 3 hours each semester. 

898. Dissertation. 12 hrs. 

Geology (GLY) 

501. Principles of Stratigraphy. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 304, 308, 341, or permission of instructor. A study of die character 
and distribution of sedimentary rock units in space and time. 

503. Optical Mineralogy. 3 hrs. Pre- or Corequisite: GLY 304. Introduction to optical mineralogy and diin section study of 
rocks using polarizing microscope. 

503L Optical Mineralogy Laboratory. 1 hr Corequisite: GLY 503. 

505. Sedimentology. 3 hrs. Study of the character of sediments and sedimentary structures in the context of depositional 
environments. 

505L. Sedimentology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 505. 

506. Fundamentals of Crystallography. 1 hr. Prerequisite: MAT 103. An introduction to die concepts of crystal systems, 
morphology, Herman-Mauguin symbols, Braviais lattice, unit cells, Mdler indices, and X-ray diffraction. 

506L. Fundamentals of Crystallography Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 506. 

507. Principles of X-ray Diffraction. 1 hr. Prerequisite: GLY 301 or permission of instructor. Introduction to principles, 
analytical techniques, and precautions involved in X-ray diffraction instrumentation. 

507L. Principles of X-ray Diffraction Laboratory. Corequisite: GLY 507. 

508. Petrography. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 503 and GLY 503L. Characterization of rock composition and textures, 
classification, and petrogenesis with use of polarizing microscope and tliin sections. 

508L. Petrography Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 508. 

510. Elements of Geochemistry. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 304. Chemical principles governing the formation of minerals and 

rocks and their reactions with the hthosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. 

511. Applied Groundwater Geochemistry. 3 hrs. Recommended prerequisites: GLY 510, GLY 576. Applications of 
chemistry to the study of groundwater, interactions witii natural materials and human-induced groundwater changes. 

520. Applied Geophysics I. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 308, MAT 168, and PHY 112 or 202 or permission of instructor. 
Introduction to seismic methods used in hydrocarbon and mineral exploration. 

520L, Applied Geophysics I Laboratory. I hr. Corequisite: GLY 520 

521. Applied Geophysics II. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 308, MAT 168, and PHY 112 or 202 or permission of instructor. 
Introduction to gravity, magnetic, and electrical methods used in hydrocarbon and mineral exploration. 

52 1L. Applied Geophysics n Laboratory. 1 lir. Corequisite: GLY 521. 

522. Geophysical Well-Logging. 3 hrs. Prerequisites: GLY 101, MAT 103, and PHY 112 or 202. Pre- or Corequisite. GLY 

505. Principles of obtaining data from bore hole instruments, and geological interpretation of data. 

522L. Geophysical Well-Logging Laboratory. 1 hr. Must be taken concurrently with GLY 522. 

523. Geological Remote Sensing and GIS. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GLY 523L. Introduction to the use of geospatial data and 
imagery in applied geology. 



ill 



278 || Course Descriptions 



523L. Geological Remote Sensing and GIS Laboratory. 2 hrs. Corequisite: GLY 523. 

530. Principles of Geology for Science Teachers. 3 hrs. Corequisite: GLY 530L. Principles of physical and historical geology 
for teachers. Not applicable to geology degree. 

530L. Principles of Geology for Science Teachers Laboratory. 1 hr. Must be taken concurrentiy with GLY 530. 

543. Calcareous Micropaleontology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 341. Taxonomy, morphology, and stratigraphic use of 
calcareous microfossils. 

543L. Calcareous Micropaleontology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 543. 

544. Siliceous Micropaleontology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 341. Taxonomy, morphology, and stratigraphic use of siliceous 
and organic-walled microfossils. 

544L. Siliceous Micropaleontology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 544 

550. Geological Marine Science. 3 hrs. Pre- or Corequisite: GLY 505 or permission of instructor. Study of the formation and 
deformation of the oceanic crust and the distribution and character of marine sediments. 

550L. Geological Marine Science Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 550. Examination and interpretation of marine 
geological samples and data. 

565. Engineering Geology. 3 hrs. The integration of geologic and engineering principles and their application in the 
evaluation and utilization of earth resources and the mitigation of natural and human-induced hazards. 

570. Petroleum Geology. 3 hrs. Pre- or Corequisite: GLY 401 or permission of instructor. The origin, occurrence, and 
accumulation of oil and natural gas. 

570L. Petroleum Geology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 570. 

574. Geological Excursion. 1-4 hrs. Field studies of geological phenomena in areas remote from the campus. 

576. Hydrology. 3 hrs. An introduction to the origin, distribution, movement, and properties of the waters of the earth. 

587. Industrial Rocks and Minerals. 3 hrs. Nature and fonnation of industrial rock and mineral deposits. 

600. Palcoclimatology. 3 hrs. Past climatic conditions based on the rock, mineral, and biologic record. 

601 . Pleistocene Geology. 3 hrs. Earth histoiy of the Pleistocene epoch, with emphasis on glacial phenomena. 

603. Sedimentary Environments. 3 hrs. Comparison of modern environments of sedimentation with the evidence regarding 

paleoenvironments. 

604. Tectonics. 3 hrs. Investigation of large-scale crustal defonnation. 

607. Sedimentary Petrology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 403/503, 405/505, or permission of instructor. Origin, classification, 
composition and geochemistry of sedimentary rocks. 

607L. Sedimentary Petrology Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 607. 

608. Gulf Coast Geology. 3 hrs. Stratigraphy, structural geology, and mineral resources of the Gulf Coastal Province of die 

United States. 

612. Isotope Geology. 3 hrs. Theory and application of geochronology and die use of isotopes as tracers of geological 
processes. 

615. Clay Mineralogy. 3 hrs. Origin, structure, and chemistry of clays, identification techniques, clay-water systems, sod 
formation, and engineering applications. 

615L. Clay Mineralogy Laboratory. 1 hr. Corequisite: GLY 615. 

641. Paleoecology. 3 hrs. Prerequisite: GLY 341 or equivalent.